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Entries in Counties (2)

Monday
Oct222012

Most County Housing Markets Worse Off over Last Four Years, Says RealtyTrac

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- While housing prices are on the rise, foreclosure and real estate research firm RealtyTrac reported that 65 percent of 919 county housing markets are worse off than they were four years ago, based mostly on factors including average sales price and foreclosure inventory.

With the 2012 Election Day just two weeks away, both Republicans and Democrats are grabbing at data to show that the economy has improved or worsened.

Housing data from S&P/Case-Shiller index and the National Association of Realtors show a rise in the average price of a home. Last week, the association showed sales fell 1.7 percent in September compared with a month earlier, but were up 11 percent over a year ago.

In the latest RealtyTrac report, the company compared data from the second quarters of 2008, the near-end of President George W. Bush's administration, and 2012 under President Obama. During the last four years, foreclosure inventory peaked in 2010 at 2.2 million, but has declined to 1.5 million.

Here are 10 counties that RealtyTrac noted are worse off and five counties that are better off compared to four years ago.

WORSE
Cook County, Ill.
Average sales price: -17 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 37 percent

WORSE
King County, Wash.
Average sales price: -16 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 62 percent

WORSE
Salt Lake County, Utah
Average sales price: -36 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 49 percent

WORSE
Pima County, Ariz.
Average sales price: -31 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 17 percent

WORSE
Honolulu County, Hawaii
Average sales price: -20 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 650 percent

WORSE
Du Page County, Ill.
Average sales price: -18 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 65 percent

WORSE
Gwinnett County, Ga.
Average sales price: -19 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 24 percent

WORSE
Montgomery County, Pa.
Average sales price: -7 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 77 percent

WORSE

Snohomish County, Wash.
Average sales price: -16 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 94 percent

WORSE
Lake County, Ill.
Average sales price: -22 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 78 percent

BETTER
Orange County, Calif.
Average sales price: 2 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: -38 percent

BETTER
New York County, N.Y.
Average sales price: 29 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: -12 percent

BETTER
Middlesex County, Mass.
Average sales price: 10 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: -10 percent

BETTER
Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Average sales price: 13 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: -44 percent

BETTER
Fairfax County, Va.
Average sales price: 7 percent
Foreclosure Inventory: 60 percent

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Dec192010

Census Bureau Data: Richest Counties Get Richer, Poorest Get Poorer

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The rich get richer and the poor get poorer, at least judging by the most extreme neighborhoods for median household income in the latest Census Bureau data.

The census' American Community Survey, released last week, provides detailed neighborhood data, including languages spoken in a home, commute time and income levels.

The poorest county, Owsley County, Ky., had the lowest median household income outside of Puerto Rico. Its median income decreased to $18,869 from $20,346 in 2000. Of all the county or county equivalents, Falls Church, Va. had the highest median income, at $113,313, an increase from $96,449 in 2000.

Virginia also was home to the counties with the three highest median household incomes, and the only counties with median household incomes greater than $100,000. Fairfax County had a $104,259 median household income, and Loudoun County had one of $112,021.

The data came from surveys which were mailed to about 3 million addresses from January 2005 through December 2009. The Census Bureau's official 2010 census demographic data, which provide less detail on the neighborhood level, will be released on Dec. 21. 

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio