SEARCH

Entries in Interview (7)

Monday
Sep102012

Bob Woodward on What Went Wrong with Failed Debt Deal

ABC/ Ida Mae Astute(NEW YORK) -- "Gaps" in President Obama's leadership contributed to the collapse of a "grand bargain" on spending and debt last year, with the president failing to cultivate congressional relationships that may have helped him break through Republican opposition, author Bob Woodward told ABC News' Diane Sawyer.

Woodward's reporting in his new book, The Price of Politics, reveals a president whom he said lacked the "stamina" in turning personal relationships with congressional leaders into action the way some of his predecessors have done.

"President Clinton, President Reagan. And if you look at them, you can criticize them for lots of things. They by and large worked their will," Woodward told Sawyer. "On this, President Obama did not."

"Now, some people are going to say he was fighting a brick wall, the Republicans in the House and the Republicans in Congress. Others will say it's the president's job to figure out how to tear down that brick wall. In this case, he did not."

Asked if Obama simply wasn't ready for the job of being president, Woodward responded:

"I am not ducking this. I am weighing evidence, and there's evidence that he got on top of a lot of things, he did a lot of things. And there's evidence that there are gaps," he said. "He did not fix this."

Woodward places particular blame for the failure to reach a deal with Obama, writing that the seeds of discord were planted early in his administration. He displayed "two sides" of his personality in early meetings with congressional leaders, Woodward said.

"There's this divided-man quality to President Obama always. Initially he meets with the congressional leaders, he says you know, 'We're going to be accommodating, we're going to listen, we're going to talk, we're going to compromise," Woodward said.

"But then they -- Republicans ask some questions and challenge him a little bit and he says, 'Look I won. I'm in charge here,'" Woodward continued. "And the Republicans feel totally isolated and ostracized. And this was the beginning of a war."

Last summer's debate over the debt ceiling was an intense period for the Obama presidency -- and a perilous one for the nation. One White House aide described it as the economic equivalent of the Cuban Missile Crisis; in an interview with Woodward, Obama himself compared the tension during this timeframe with his decision to strike Osama bin Laden's compound.

Tune in to ABC’s World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline on Monday, Sept. 10, 2012 to see Diane Sawyer's exclusive interview with Bob Woodward.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May012012

Zuckerberg Explains Life-Saving Facebook Tool, Stays Mum on IPO

Rick Rowell/ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Conversations over the dinner table with his med-student girlfriend helped Mark Zuckerberg formulate his latest big idea — harnessing the power of Facebook to help eliminate the critical shortage of organs for patients desperately in need of life-saving transplants.

And it was his friendship with Apple founder Steve Jobs, whose life was extended by years following a liver transplant, in part, that spurred the 27-year-old Facebook founder and CEO to help put that idea into practice.

“Facebook is really about communicating and telling stories… We think that people can really help spread awareness of organ donation and that they want to participate in this to their friends. And that can be a big part of helping solve the crisis that’s out there,” Zuckerberg told ABC’s Robin Roberts in an exclusive interview at Facebook’s headquarters.

Starting Tuesday, users in the United States and U.K. will be able to add that they’re organ donors to their Timelines, and if they’re not organ donors, they can find links to official organ donation registries and instantly enroll.

“We want to make it simple,” said Zuckerberg. “You just put in the state or country that you’re from, so that we can help link you to the official registries.”

In the “health and wellness” section of users’ timelines, users can list their status as organ donors and explain the decision to their friends, in an effort to raise awareness about the need for donors.

More than 112,000 Americans are awaiting organs, and 18 people die every day from the lack of available organs, according to Donate Life America, a nonprofit alliance that is partnering with Facebook.

Zuckerberg, 27, has made a fortune on the idea that people want to share everything – from photos, to the intimate details of their romantic lives. Yet, Zuckerberg himself is famously private, keeping details of his personal life – not to mention a much-anticipated Facebook IPO — under tight wraps.

In conversation with Roberts, Zuckerberg kept the door on the IPO tightly shut – citing the government-mandated quiet period before the IPO — and saying only “we try to keep very focused on the long term… We’ll be judged by how good the things are that we build and whether people like them.”

But he revealed some small details of his personal life, lighting up when talking about the dinnertime chats he had with girlfriend Priscilla Chan that helped lead to the donation initiative.

“She’s in medical school now,” Zuckerberg said of Chan. “She’s going to be a pediatrician, so our dinner conversations are often about Facebook and the kids that she’s meeting.”

Chan told him stories about patients she meets “getting sicker as they don’t have the organ that they need.” But there were other stories too, of children who ultimately received transplants. Stories, Zuckerberg called, “unbelievable.”

From Chan he learned of one boy in need of a heart transplant. His skin had turned blue from lack of oxygen, but within weeks of receiving a transplant he was out again playing sports.

“How can that not make you happy?” he asked.

Chan inspired Zuckerberg to try to learn Mandarin Chinese in one year. That venture, he admitted, was unsuccessful, but he picked up enough to natter with Chan’s elderly grandmother.

Zuckerberg said he was further prompted make Facebook an important tool to encourage donors to register following the death of Steve Jobs, whom he called a “friend.” Though Zuckerberg never talked with Jobs specifically about a Facebook donation tool, he said many of the people involved in the project were inspired after Jobs’ death.

“That definitely, I think, was something that we all had in mind as we were building this out… His story is just one of many, of people who both were able to have an organ transplant that made his life longer and he was extremely thankful for that,” Zuckerberg said.

Facebook was initially developed by Zuckerberg while still an undergraduate at Harvard. The site was initially conceived as place for college students to socialize. Recently, however, Zuckerberg said he’s been surprised by the power of the network and the way users use its tools creatively in times of crisis, like finding loved-ones following tornadoes in the Midwest or the tsunami in Japan.

“People are using the same social tools that they’re using just to keep in touch with people on a day-to-day basis to solve these important issues,” he said.

The technology behind the donation application, Zuckerberg said, is a “pretty simple thing.” But the ability to link people across hundreds of miles and save their lives? That, he called, “amazing.”

Both the company and organ donation advocates are hopeful the new tool could change the landscape of the organ donation process.

“I think it’s possible that we will see an impact over the next couple of years, where we would imagine eliminating the transplant waiting list,” said Dr. Andrew Cameron, Transplant Surgeon at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb242012

CareerBuilder Posts Worst Interview Mistakes of All Time

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- It's no secret the jobs situation in this country is dismal, so if you're lucky enough to land an interview, CareerBuilder.com suggests you don't ask for a sip of the interviewer's coffee.

Believe it or not, an applicant actually did that during an interview.  That mistake and others are part of a new list compiled by the online jobs site, based on real-life encounters of hiring managers.

Among the obvious mistakes cited by experts are being late to interviews or appearing cocky.  Some less-obvious first impression flubs that hiring managers have seen?  Texting or taking a cellphone call during an interview, inexplicably wearing a Boy Scout uniform, or telling an interviewer the offered position, "isn't worth starting the car for."

Here's the full list of the most unusual interviewing mistakes, as compiled by CareerBuilder.com:

-- Candidate brought a "'How To Interview' book" with him to the interview.

-- Candidate asked, "What company is this again?"

-- Candidate put the interviewer on hold during a phone interview. When she came back on the line, she told the interviewer that she had a date set up for Friday.

-- When a candidate interviewing for a security position wasn't hired on the spot, he painted graffiti on the building.

-- Candidate was arrested by federal authorities after a background check revealed the person had an outstanding warrant.

-- Candidate talked about promptness as one of her strengths after showing up 10 minutes late.

-- While driving to the interview, the candidate passed, cut-off and flipped his middle finger at a motorist who happened to be the interviewer.

-- Candidate referred to himself in the third person.

--Candidate took off his shoes during the interview.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct192011

Madoff Widow Blames Bernie for Son's Suicide Attempts, Death

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- While many lost their fortunes thanks to Bernie Madoff -- the man who orchestrated the largest financial fraud scam in U.S. history -- Stephanie Madoff Mack lost her husband. Now, the widow of Mark Madoff, Bernie Madoff's oldest son, is the first inside member of the Madoff family to speak out, divulging the story of the death that she says can be traced directly to Bernie Madoff's deception.

In a searing and emotional interview to be broadcast Friday on ABC’s 20/20, Mack details how a privileged life in one of the richest families in America turned into a living nightmare after Madoff's Ponzi scheme was uncovered. Mack says the ordeal led Mark Madoff to commit suicide last December, on the two-year anniversary of his father's arrest. Mark had first attempted suicide in 2009, Stephanie reveals for the first time.

"He couldn't get out, he was so betrayed and so hurt by Bernie," she said.

"I hate Bernie Madoff," Stephanie said. "If I saw Bernie Madoff right now, I would tell him that I hold him fully responsible for killing my husband, and I'd spit in his face."

Mack has written a book on her life as a Madoff, The End of Normal: A Wife's Anguish, A Widow's New Life, scheduled for release this week by Blue Rider Press.

Stephanie, then 30, married Mark Madoff, the handsome and wealthy 40-year-old divorced father of two, in October, 2004. In attendance at their Nantucket Island wedding were many investors in Bernie Madoff's fraudulent hedge fund.

"He stood there in the corner at my wedding watching everyone dance, and he knew that everyone in that room was going to get screwed," said Mack.

The couple went on to have two children: a daughter, Audrey, and a son, Nick.

With Mark's blessing, Stephanie changed her last name to Mack to spare her family the stigma of that now reviled name. Today, her children are healthy and happy and Mack says she intends to keep them that way.

"I will never let it define my two children for the rest of our lives," she said. "The rest of my life is going to be a happy one, and not filled with deceit, and lies, and betrayal, and sorrow, and I hold onto that hope."

Watch the full story on ABC's 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Sep302011

Buffett Says ‘Buffett Rule’ Should Apply Only to ‘Ultra-Rich’

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(NEW YORK) -- Billionaire investment tycoon Warren Buffett, who has become the unwitting mascot of President Obama’s jobs plan, is less than thrilled with one of the plan’s main provisions: the millionaires’ tax, or as it’s come to be known, the “Buffett Rule.”

In an interview with Bloomberg Television on Friday, Buffett said he did not support the president’s plan to increase taxes on people who earn more than $1 million per year.

“It isn’t [my idea] to have the rich pay more taxes. It’s to have the ultra-rich pay more,” he said, according to The Hill. “What I’m talking about would probably apply to 50,000 people in the country.”

Later on CNBC, Buffett said if it were up to him, people earning $50 million would not see any tax increases, only people with “very high incomes that are taxed very low.” Buffett did not put on a number on what a “very high income” would be.

The Buffett Rule, as President Obama has taken to calling it, is a provision in Obama’s American Jobs Act that would increase the tax rate for millionaires to ensure that high income earners do not pay a lower tax rate than middle-or low-income earners. Obama dubbed this provision the Buffett Rule after the billionaire investor said there should be “shared sacrifice” in reducing the deficit.

In a New York Times op-ed in August, Buffett complained that he and his “mega-rich” friends have been “coddled” by a “billionaire-friendly Congress” because he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary.

The day after Buffett’s piece ran in the Sunday paper, Obama cited it as proof that a “balanced” approach was necessary in deficit reduction. Less than a month later, Obama introduced his American Jobs Act, which included the so-called Buffett Rule.

Buffett said Friday he has not “looked at all the details” of the president’s jobs act, which he called a “stimulus plan,” but said he would probably not support the entire bill.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun172011

Obama to ABC News: "We've Got to Put More People Back to Work"

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- In an exclusive interview with ABC's Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts, President Obama expressed his desire to see the struggling American economy rebound, and reiterated his commitment to pushing for an extension of this year's payroll tax cut.

"Whatever incentives we can provide for businesses to hire more people and provide an investment climate where more businesses are out there trying to expand, the better off we're going to be. And so I'll be working with leadings in both parties, hopefully, to make the right decisions for the American people," he said.

"We've got to put more people back to work," he told Roberts during the interview, which aired Friday.

National unemployment rose in May to 9.1 percent, up from 9 percent in April. Economists had expected unemployment to fall, so the May numbers were met with disappointment.

There are an estimated 13.9 million unemployed people in the United States.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb282011

Bernie Madoff on Ponzi Scheme: 'Everyone Was Greedy'

Photo Courtesy - Mario Tama/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Ponzi scheme architect Bernie Madoff distributed guilt in his latest interview -- the second since being locked up.

Madoff repeated his allegations that banks and funds had to know he was a fraud but said nothing because they were getting rich.  He told New York magazine that he was the only one suffering.

"It was a nightmare for me.  Yes, of course, only for me," he said.

Madoff told the magazine that "everyone was greedy" and that "there was complicity."

He also said the "SEC looks terrible" and he called new Wall Street reforms "a joke."

"The whole government," Madoff said, "is a ponzi scheme."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio