SEARCH

Entries in Nestle (5)

Tuesday
May082012

Girl Scout Cookies to Be Featured in New Candy Bar

Nestle(NEW YORK) -- Girl Scout cookie season is arguably the highlight of the year for those who anticipate the appearance of the bright yellow, blue and green boxes.

Starting in June, fans will be able to get their cookie fix in the form of a candy bar.  The Girl Scouts have teamed with Nestle to create Crunch bars flavored with Thin Mint, Caramel Coconut (Samoa-inspired) or Peanut Butter Creme (Tagalong-inspired).

With $760 million in cookies sold last year, it isn't surprising that the demand for the candy bars has already begun.

"When word of this irresistible combination of Nestlé Crunch and Girl Scout Cookie flavors leaked earlier this year, consumers started calling," said Nestle spokesperson Tricia Bowles in a statement.

For those who can't wait until June, Nestle will launch a Facebook promotion Wednesday that will allow consumers to buy bars from a limited supply.

Starting June 1, they will be available nationwide and retail for about $1 per bar and $4 per box.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Oct032011

Commercial Meant to Appeal to Dogs?

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Nestle Purina created an interactive commercial now airing in Germany and Austria featuring different high-pitched squeaks and tones meant to appeal to the furriest of family members.

After consulting with experts in pet behavior based in St. Joseph, Mo., the folks at Nestle Purina learned that dogs’ hearing is twice as sharp as humans’.

“They can pick up frequencies which are beyond our range and they are better at differentiating sounds,” said Dr. Georg Sanders, a nutrition expert and consumer consultant at Nestlé Purina PetCare in Germany.

The commercial, made specifically for Beneful, first uses a squeak similar to the sound a dog’s toy makes, something that both the pup and its owner will be able to hear. The commercial also has the sound of a high-frequency tone -- much like a dog whistle -- that dogs respond to but humans can hardly recognize.

The marketing ploy follows another of the company’s campaigns, also launched in Germany, where dogs were able to sniff out the smell of Beneful dog food while on a walk with their owners on special posters. It seems the company hopes that by catching the pet’s attention they can also influence the people who make the shopping decisions in the household. But Nestle Purina says that the commercial is only meant to highlight the special relationship between owners and pets.

“We wanted to create a TV commercial that our four-legged friends can enjoy and listen to, but also allow the owner and dog to experience it together,” said Anna Rabanus, Brand Manager of Beneful for Nestlé Purina PetCare Germany.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jun132011

Nestle Invests Billions to Decode Digestive Systems

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images(VEVEY, Switzerland) -- Nestle, the world's largest food company -- responsible for making Eskimo Pies, Haagen-Dazs ice cream, and Tombstone frozen pizza -- has invested billions of dollars to research metabolic disorders and improve nutrition in our diets.

Headquartered near the tranquil waters of Lake Geneva in Vevey, Switzerland, the Nestle Research Center hosts a team of top food scientists dedicated to decoding the human metabolism. The company also agreed to purchase Prometheus Laboratories Inc, a maker of treatments for cancer and gastrointestinal illnesses, Bloomberg reported last month.

Metabolomics, or the study of the chemical processes of the human metabolism, is a relatively new field of science. It has only been around for about 10 years, according to Nestle researcher Alastair Ross.

Using artificial body parts, scientists test the digestion cycles of infants, adults -- even dogs. In one experiment, they pumped strawberry yogurt through an artificial human intestine filled with acids, enzymes and pig bile. There are millions of receptors in the gut that give feedback to the brain, including the feeling of satiety or hunger.

They're also trying to decode what consumers -- too young to talk -- think about different foods.

"By examining closely the facial expression of the baby we can identify...differences between rejection and fullness, for example," said Ciaran Forde, a senior sensory specialist.

Other experiments use live adult test subjects, who are questioned about their eating habits, such as how much of this food versus that food does the subject thinks he would need to feel full. They are even analyzing urine samples in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to unlock the secrets of human metabolism. Aside from food studies, Nestle scientists also use software that tracks a person's eye movement as he looks over a product's packaging to analyze how effectively the product is marketed.

With about 10,000 brands under its name, Nestle's global sales last year nearly reached $105 billion. In 2010, its food and beverage division spent $1.3 billion on research and development.

The company spent 10 years perfecting "extrusion freezing" to make low fat ice cream for their Bryer's Slow Churned ice cream brand. It developed an infant cereal that reduces constipation under their Nestum brand. It even invented a low carbon footprint coffee machine for the Dolce Gusto.

But aside from just improving its products, Nestle is also studying how our bodies crave fat and sugar in order to develop healthier products and help ease the American obesity epidemic. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in four Americans is considered obese.

The challenge is not only to crack the code on how to make healthy food more desirable but also how to trick our bodies into making us feel full faster and longer so we eat less.

After running tests with the artificial stomach, Nestle scientists discovered that olive oil treated with monoglyceride -- a lipid often found in chewing gum, whipped cream, and other bakery products -- will take eight times longer to digest than regular olive oil.

"We think that if it is slower it also will mean that people will feel full for a longer time and then they'll maybe eat less and snack less," explained Heribert Watzke.

Scientists are also developing personalized diets, tailored down to suit an individual's own digestive system.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Mar152011

'Lean Cuisine' Spaghetti and Meatballs Recalled

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service(WASHINGTON) -- Nestle is recalling more than 10,000 pounds of its Lean Cuisine frozen spaghetti and meatball entrée after consumers reported finding pieces of hard plastic in the product.

The recall includes 9.5-oz. packages of "Lean Cuisine Simple Favorites, Spaghetti with Meatballs." Packages bear a case code 0298595519P and a best before date of November, 2011.

The company said the spaghetti dishes were shipped to distributors and retail stores east of the Rocky Mountains.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service said Tuesday that there have been no injuries reported in connection to the recall.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Oct222010

Nestle Announces Candy Recall 

Photo Courtesy - PRNewsFoto(GLENDALE, Calif.) -- Nestle has announced a voluntary recall of Raisinets brand candies.

The company announced the recall of the 10oz bags Friday after it was found that certain lots could contain undeclared peanuts, according to Nestle. So far three complaints have been reported.

The Nestle Raisinets Fun Size Bags were only distributed in the U.S. to Target, Shop Rite and Don Quixote retail stores and have a production code of 02015748.

Nestle has advised consumers who are allergic to peanuts and who have purchased the recalled products to avoid consumption and contact Nestle Consumer Service at 1-800-478-5670.

The recall does not impact any other Nestle products.


Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio









ABC News Radio