SEARCH

Entries in Society (1)

Tuesday
Mar012011

Federal Report: Women Gaining in Education But Stalled on Pay

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- American women are making real gains, especially in college and graduate education, but they continue to lag behind men in pay, according to a report released Tuesday by the White House that administration officials say will be used as a basis for policy changes.

The White House released the report, "Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being," to kick off Women's History Month. It was described as a "statistical portrait" showing how women are faring in the country today and how their roles have changed over time.

Administration officials acknowledged that there is nothing new to these reports -- compiled from reports that were already available to the public -- but said that the compilation of the findings shows something important for women and families that will influence the president's policies.

The administration said some of the key findings of the report were:

Women have not only caught up with men in college attendance but younger women are now more likely than younger men to have a college or a graduate degree. Women are also working more and the number of women and men in the labor force has nearly equalized in recent years. As women's work has increased, their earnings constitute a growing share of family income.

Gains in education and labor force involvement have not yet translated into wage and income equity. At all levels of education, women earned about 75 percent of what their male counterparts earned in 2009. In part because of these lower earnings and in part because unmarried and divorced women are the most likely to have responsibility for raising and supporting their children, women are more likely to be in poverty than men. These economic inequities are even more acute for women of color.

Women live longer than men but are more likely to face certain health problems, such as mobility impairments, arthritis, asthma, depression and obesity. Women are also less physically active than men. Women are less likely than men to suffer from heart disease or diabetes. One out of seven women age 18-64 has no usual source of health care and the share of women in that age range without health insurance has also increased.

Women are less likely than in the past to be the target of violent crimes, including homicide. But women are victims of certain crimes, such as intimate partner violence and stalking, at higher rates than men.

The report focused on five areas: people, families and income; education; unemployment; health; and crime and violence. The administration will be observing Women's History Month by highlighting a different section of the report each week.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio