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Entries in Voicemail (2)

Tuesday
May282013

Papa John's CEO Apologizes for Delivery Man's Racist Voicemail

Photo by Hemant Chawla/The India Today Group/Getty Images(SANFORD, Fla.) -- Papa John's Chairman and CEO John Schnatter apologized to a customer in Sanford, Fla., on Tuesday for a racist rant a Papa John's delivery man inadvertently left on the customer's voicemail.

After he delivered a pizza to the Sanford customer and his wife Sunday evening, the delivery man "butt dialed" the customer and left a voicemail message laden with racial slurs as he complained about his tip.

The customer posted a video on YouTube in which he showed the pizza delivery receipt, explaining he and his wife tipped 21 percent, "as usual."

In the voicemail message, which lasts about four minutes, the Papa John's employee complains to another Papa John's employee about the $5 tip and uses the N-word and other racial expletives, which he also incorporated into a song about the customer.

"I guess that's the only requirement for being a [N-word] in Sanford," a city still reeling from racial tensions after the shooting of Trayvon Martin last year.

"Yeah, they give me five bucks there -- fine outstanding African-American gentleman of the community," the delivery man can be heard saying in the call.

His fellow co-worker laughed in response.

Schnatter posted an apology on Papa John's Facebook page on Monday afternoon.

"Friends, I am extremely concerned to learn about the reprehensible language used by two former employees in one of our restaurants," the Facebook post stated. "Their thinking and actions defy both my personal and the company's values, and everything for which this company stands."

Schnatter said the employees "responsible for this absolutely unacceptable behavior were immediately terminated."

"My heartfelt apology goes out to the customer involved, his family and our community at large. I am very sorry that anyone would be exposed to these hurtful and painful words by any person involved in any way with our company," Schnatter said.

A call to Papa John's by ABC News for further comment was not immediately returned.

Many Facebook users who commented in response to Schnatter's post applauded his public apology.

One Facebook user said Schnatter is "a CEO that actually takes responsibility for the actions of his employees. You can't control employees, but you can take appropriate action."

In January 2012, a customer was described on a paper receipt as "Lady Chink Eyes" by a Papa John's employee in New York City.

Last month, a CVS customer in New Jersey filed a million-dollar lawsuit against CVS for being called, "Lee, Ching Chong".

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jul222011

Consumers Make Cellphone Hacking Easy

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The phone hacking scandal that led to the demise of News of the World and put News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch in the hot seat highlights just how easy it is for predators to break into cellphones.

Your phone can be hacked two ways: "hacking into your cellphone as you're on the phone or hacking into your voicemail," says Mark Rasch, director of cybersecurity and privacy consulting at Computer Sciences Corp.

The first method -- breaking into your phone while you're talking on it -- is difficult, says Rasch.  A hacker would need to hack into your cellphone provider or corrupt an employee who works for the company to listen in on a conversation.

The second method -- breaking into your voicemail -- is not so tough.  It involves installing a program that would allow the hacker to capture and intercept phone calls.

"It is very easy to do, and that's typically because voicemail is secured with a short four digit number.  It can be hacked, spoofed, guessed and social engineered," says Rasch.

What makes it so easy?  Blame yourself.  Most people choose simplistic passwords that are easy for hackers to guess.

"The most common pass code is the last four digits of your phone number," says Rasch.

"People want something easy to remember and easy to type at 75 miles per hour with a cup of coffee in the hand and the cellphone in the other," says Rasch. "They'll pick the same pin number for ATM, cellphone and a dozen other things.  It's just human nature."

To avoid these pitfalls, some say passwords should be automated or randomly selected.

"You shouldn't be able to pick your password or pass code," says Daniel Amitay, an iPhone developer.  "It should be randomized.  The problem with pass codes and passwords is people pick them."

All eyes have been trained on News Corp. in recent weeks, following allegations that the now-defunct News of the World hacked the phones of more than 4,000 politicians, crime victims and celebrities.

But at the center of the firestorm was Milly Dowler, a 13-year-old murder victim whose cell phone was hacked by journalists on the hunt for a big scoop.  When the teenager disappeared in early 2002, reporters allegedly listened to the dead girl's voicemail and deleted messages on the system, tainting the investigation and creating false hope among the victim's family members that she might still be alive.

While it's unclear exactly how the reporters gained access to Milly Dowler's voicemail, one lesson emerges: it wasn't too hard.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio