SEARCH

Entries in Vote (2)

Wednesday
Mar142012

Frontier Airlines Asks Public to Choose Next ‘Spokesanimal’

Frontier Airlines(DENVER) -- Frontier Airlines has decided to let the public choose its next “spokesanimal.” The winner, to be announced at the end of April, will be the next animal to appear on a Frontier aircraft tail. Each of Frontier’s planes has a “spokesanimal” on its tail, with more than 60 in all.

Fans voting for their favorite candidate at FrontierAirlines.com will receive a special offer by email for a discount on future Frontier travel and will also be entered to win up to $2,500 in Frontier Fly Bucks. Fans can also visit Frontier’s Facebook page and enter to win a number of prizes, including the new iPad, Kindle Fire and Frontier Fly Bucks.

The 18 contenders in the running include:

  1. Doris the Chicken
  2. Vladimir the Bat
  3. Tina the Grebe
  4. Doug the Dung Beetle
  5. Enrique the Tree Frog
  6. Polly the Parrot
  7. Paula the Pig
  8. Ralph the Ram
  9. Alivina the Owl
  10. Samson the Sloth
  11. Melvin the Turtle
  12. Chloe the Chipmunk
  13. Cammie the Cow
  14. Joanne the Giraffe
  15. Fred the Walrus
  16. Duke the Arctic Dog
  17. Will & Hill the Prairie Dogs
  18. Mario the Lizard

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Dec142010

Senate Tax Cut Plan Has Something for Everyone

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Like gluttons at a buffet party, politicians couldn't help loading their plates with goodies for various industries and individuals in this week's 83-15 Senate tax package vote.

Not only did the Senate vote to extend the Bush-era tax cuts, they carved out special provisions for everything from tax credits to Hollywood producers to breaks for rum production in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

These 60 or so benefits or business "extenders" that assist specific industries added substantially to the estimated $858-billion cost of the bill over the next two years, a gargantuan meal at the U.S. taxpayers' expense that will have to be paid for in future years.

"These extenders come up every year or so in Washington just when you think they're going to expire," said Mark Robyn, staff economist with the Tax Foundation. He said the extender provisions are meant to stimulate the economy and investment but there are ongoing debates about whether they work.

More than two dozen amendments to the Senate bill have been filed addressing breaks for even more sectors -- it's unclear if or when these will come to a vote. The House has yet to get its collective hands on a bill.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio