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Entries in Kevin Costner (15)

Friday
Jul272012

Kevin Costner Sues Producers of His 1991 Film "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves"

Charley Gallay/WireImage(LOS ANGELES) -- Academy Award winner Kevin Costner has filed a suit against the production company of his own movie, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, claiming it reneged on its obligation to pay him his share of revenue from the hit film.

Costner said he was promised 15 percent of sales from Robin Hood, which generated over $25 million in its opening weekend in the U.S. in May 1991, earned over $390 million in worldwide theatrical revenue, and "tens of millions more from worldwide television, home video and other sources," according to the suit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court this week.

"The main beneficiary of this success has been the production company that made the [film], Morgan Creek," the suit says. Morgan Creek Productions is an independent production company in Santa Monica, Calif., founded in 1988. The company also produced the Young Guns and Major League franchises and Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and its sequel, Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls.

Costner is suing for actual and punitive damages, claiming breach of contract, fraud and unjust enrichment.

This is Costner's second Hollywood legal battle this summer. Last month, a federal jury in New Orleans sided with Costner after actor Stephen Baldwin claimed he was kept in the dark over an oil cleanup contraption Costner helped develop.

"When Morgan Creek contracted with Mr. Costner to appear in the film, they promised that if the film was successful, they would share the profits with him," the suit says. "However, when it came time to report and account to Mr. Costner, Morgan Creek was less than forthcoming."

Morgan Creek Productions did not return a message requesting comment.

"Everyone deserves to be compensated for their work in an honest and timely manner no matter what their profession," Mr. Costner's publicists said in a statement to ABC News. "Unfortunately Morgan Creek has not operated in an honest and timely manner where the agreed upon compensation for Kevin Costner's work in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves is concerned, so he has been forced to take this action to hold them accountable."

Costner claims Morgan Creek promised him 12.5 percent of the movie's adjusted gross sales above $60 million and 15 percent of adjusted gross sales above $100 million, among other revenue.

Costner claims Morgan Creek Productions was "consistently late in rendering statements" and "they simply stopped altogether."

In addition, the actor claims Morgan Creek Productions "drastically underreported" home video sales and failed to report any television sales.

The suit also claims the company "intentionally concealed information and employed inaccurate and improper accounting practices designed to deprive Mr. Costner of his backend participation."

Costner further claims Morgan Creek went behind his back in 2006 and assigned the foreign distribution rights of Robin Hood and other films for $21 million to Morgan Creek International, a sister company owned by its CEO James Robinson, which is now called Inverness. Costner claims the production company did not report "a single dollar ... in connection with the sale."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun142012

Kevin Costner Wins Courtroom Battle over Stephen Baldwin

Charley Gallay/WireImage(NEW ORLEANS) -- In the New Orleans courtroom clash of Hollywood actors, Kevin Costner is the winner.

A federal jury Thursday evening rejected a claim by the actor Stephen Baldwin and his friend, Spyridon Contogouris, that Costner and a business partner duped them by keeping them uninformed on a multimillion-dollar deal between Costner's company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, and the oil company BP.

Baldwin, the youngest of the four acting Baldwin brothers, and Contogouris sold their shares in Ocean Therapy Solutions before it sold cleanup devices to BP for use in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This led Baldwin to file a suit in December 2010 against Costner and Patrick Smith, over profits from the technology leased by BP.

Costner's device is a five-ton centrifuge designed to separate water from oil, spit out clean water and save the oil on ships, Smith said in his testimony.

The timeline of the case goes as far back as the production for Costner's film Waterworld. Costner starred and co-directed the science-fiction film, which tanked at the box office when it was released in 1995.

In the early 1990s, Costner financed and oversaw the development of an oil-and-water-separation technology under the auspices of a corporation owned and managed by him called CINC Inc., an acronym for Costner in Nevada Corporation.

After the April 2010 oil spill, Costner made headlines again marketing his device and snagging a $52 million deal with BP for 32 of his centrifuges.

"It separates oil and water at incredibly high speeds under very difficult conditions," Costner told Good Morning America's Sam Champion in 2010.

The devices weren't used to cap the well but were designed to collect oil on the water's surface.

Baldwin has said he was bought out of Costner's company for $500,000 while Contogouris was bought out for $1.4 million.

BP reportedly never used the 32 devices it ordered from Costner's company, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. By September 2010, the well had been sealed with cement and a relief well.

Costner's memorable work includes starring in The Bodyguard, Dancing with Wolves and Field of Dreams. Baldwin, the younger brother of actor Alec Baldwin, is best known for Bio-Dome and playing Barney Rubble in The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun082012

Kevin Costner Downplays Stephen Baldwin's Hand in Oil Cleanup

Charley Gallay/WireImage(NEW ORLEANS) -- Kevin Costner testified in a New Orleans court Friday that he never saw actor Stephen Baldwin contribute anything to his company's effort to sell oil cleanup devices to BP in the aftermath of the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Costner is being sued by Baldwin, who claims he and his business partner were duped out of money in a multimillion-dollar deal for the devices between Costner's company and BP.

Costner took the stand at 10 a.m. Friday and said he wondered what Baldwin was doing for the company before BP agreed to make an $18 million deposit on a $52 million order for 32 oil-separating centrifuges. He also said the company's CEO begged Baldwin and his business partner, Spyridon Contogouris, not to sell their shares before the deal was done, which is contrary to the claims brought in Baldwin's lawsuit.

Friday's testimony followed a tense Thursday in court when the "Waterworld" and "Field of Dreams" star told the court he went to New Orleans after the spill on a "fact-finding mission" to see if the oil-separating centrifuges he helped develop could be of any use in the cleanup. At the height of the oil spill cleanup effort, BP bought 32 of the devices for $18 million.

The lawsuit brought by Baldwin alleges that Baldwin and his friend were deliberately excluded from the meeting between Costner, his business partner Patrick Smith, and BP executive Doug Suttles where the lucrative deal was struck.

Baldwin and Contogouris say they were deceived into letting go of their shares in the new company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, one day before that deal was finalized. They're seeking more than $21 million in damages.

Costner's attorney has argued the actor had no role in Baldwin and Contogouris' decision to sell their shares, and that he's being sued because he's famous.

There have been several tense moments during the prosecution's questioning of Costner. When Baldwin's attorney, James Cobb, questioned Costner Thursday about whether his celebrity would pressure the oil giant to order his centrifugal machines, Costner countered that he didn't feel the company would buy them just because of him. He admitted he was on the company's radar, but said it was a huge crisis and it was never his intention to use his celebrity to sell the product.

"I'm not just a celebrity," Costner told the court Thursday. "I'm not just a person who opens doors."

At another point, Cobb pressed Costner for an answer about whether or not his business partner is authorized to speak on his behalf. Costner struck back.

"I don't do very well when you get very loud," he said to Cobb. "I'm trying to remember as much as I can."

He said he was nervous and his name was at stake in the trial.

Costner has been involved with the development centrifugal device, dubbed the "Costner solution," for more than 15 years. He previously claimed the machine would "give us a fighting chance to fight back the oil before it got us by the throat."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun072012

Kevin Costner Testifies in Stephen Baldwin's BP Oil Spill Suit

ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW ORLEANS) -- During a tense day in court, actor Kevin Costner testified he was heartbroken by the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and he had hoped a device he helped develop could aid the cleanup efforts.

Now, he's being sued by fellow actor Stephen Baldwin, who claims he was duped out of money in a multimillion-dollar deal for the devices between Costner's company and BP.

Costner took the stand for about an hour in a packed New Orleans courtroom, sitting just a few feet away from Baldwin, although the two never made eye contact.

The first day of questioning focused largely on Costner's background in the science and technology business. The Waterworld and Field of Dreams star told the court he went to New Orleans after the spill on a "fact-finding mission" to see if the device he helped develop could be of any help in the cleanup. At the height of the oil spill cleanup effort, BP bought 32 of the devices for $18 million.

The lawsuit brought by Stephen Baldwin alleges Baldwin and his friend, Spyridon Contogouris, were deliberately excluded from the meeting between Costner, his business partner Patrick Smith, and BP executive Doug Suttles where the incredibly lucrative deal was struck.

Baldwin and Contogouris say they were deceived into letting go of their shares in the new company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, one day before that deal was finalized. They're seeking more than $21 million in damages.

Costner's attorney argues the actor had no role in Baldwin and Contogouris' decision to sell their shares, and that he's only being sued because he's famous.

There were several tense moments during the prosecution's questioning of Costner. When Baldwin's attorney, James Cobb, questioned Costner about whether his celebrity would pressure the oil giant to order his centrifugal machines, Costner countered that he didn't feel the company would buy them just because of him. He admitted he was on the company's radar, but said it was a huge crisis and it was never his intention to use his celebrity to sell the product.

"I'm not just a celebrity," Costner told the court. "I'm not just a person who opens doors."

At another point, Cobb pressed Costner for an answer about whether or not his business partner is authorized to speak on his behalf. Costner struck back.

"I don't do very well when you get very loud," he said to Cobb. "I'm trying to remember as much as I can."

He said he was nervous and his name was at stake in the trial.

Costner has been involved with the development centrifugal device, dubbed the "Costner solution," at the center of the trial for more than 15 years. He previously claimed the machine would "give us a fighting chance to fight back the oil before it got us by the throat."

There was a brief moment of levity during testimony when Costner described the oil-and-water separating device. He noted its large size and equated the footprint to the witness box, which he called a "jail." That elicited a laugh from the courtroom.

Costner is scheduled to take the stand again at 10 a.m. ET Friday.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun072012

Kevin Costner to Testify in Stephen Baldwin Suit

ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW ORLEANS) -- Kevin Costner, the Academy Award winner who starred in Dances With Wolves and Hatfields & McCoys, may testify as early as Thursday in a Louisiana court in response to a suit filed by fellow-actor Stephen Baldwin.

Baldwin, the youngest of the four acting Baldwin brothers, filed a suit in December 2010 against Costner and his business partner, Patrick Smith, over profits from a technology that BP leased for the Deepwater Horizon spill.

The actors' trial proceedings take place daily this week and are expected to last two weeks.  Smith, the trial's first witness, testified for two hours on Monday and eight hours on Tuesday.

Costner's device is a five-ton centrifuge designed to separate water from oil, spit out clean water and save the oil, Smith said in his testimony this week.  The two seeked to place the centrifuges on ships.

The timeline of the case goes as far back as the production for Costner's film, Waterworld.  Costner starred and co-directed the science-fiction film, which tanked at the box office when it was released in 1995.

In the early 1990s, Costner financed and oversaw the development of an oil and water separation technology under the auspices of a corporation owned and managed by him called CINC Inc., which stands for "Costner in Nevada Corporation."

After the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010, Costner made headlines again marketing his device and snagging a $52 million deal with BP for 32 of his centrifuges.

"It separates oil and water at incredibly high speeds under very difficult conditions," Costner told ABC's Good Morning America's Sam Champion in 2010.

The devices weren't used to cap the well but were designed to collect oil on the water's surface.

Joining Baldwin in the lawsuit is Spyridon Contogouris, described as a hedge fund consultant and having "been friends for many years" in a court filing.  The two seek more than $21 million in damages against Costner, Smith and their company, WestPac, for duping them into selling their shares in the company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, before making the $52 million deal with BP.

Baldwin says he was bought out of Costner's company for $500,000 while Contogouris was bought out for $1.4 million.

BP reportedly never used the 32 devices it ordered from Costner's company, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.  By September 2010, the well was eventually sealed with cement and a relief well.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jun052012

Kevin Costner and Stephen Baldwin Star in Real-Life Legal Battle

Arnaldo Magnani/Getty Images(NEW ORLEANS) -- Kevin Costner and Stephen Baldwin were in a New Orleans’ courtroom Monday for the opening of a civil trial on Baldwin’s claim Costner cheated him and a friend out of millions of dollars in connection with investments in an oil separating device that was used to help clean up the Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 BP oil spill.

Baldwin and his friend, Spyridon Contogouris, invested in Costner’s company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, and claim in a lawsuit the Hatfields and McCoys actor and his business partner, Patrick Smith, duped them out of millions of dollars because they didn’t know the company had made a multi-million dollar deal with BP before they sold all their shares.

The lawsuit states BP agreed to make an $18 million dollar deposit on a $52 million deal to buy 32 oil-separating centrifuges from the company.  Baldwin and Contogouris are seeking a portion of BP’s deposit, along with $21 million in damages.

Costner’s attorney, Wayne Lee, says his client played no role in Baldwin and Contogouris’ decision to sell their shares.

Costner and the other defendants in the lawsuit have countersued.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
May302012

History's "Hatfields and McCoys" Sets Record for Viewers

George Doyle/Stockbyte/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- History's Hatfields and McCoys, starring Kevin Costner, has set a record for the network, Variety reports.

On Monday, the first of the three-part miniseries attracted 13.9 million viewers, making it the most-watched non-sports telecast in cable history.  Part three airs Wednesday.

Hatfields and McCoys is a true American story of a legendary family feud that spanned decades and nearly triggered a war between Kentucky and West Virginia.  Costner plays “Devil” Anse Hatfield and Bill Paxton portrays Randall McCoy. 

Costner tells OnThe RedCarpet.com that when you're telling the story of actual people, it's important to get it right because, "You don’t want to mess with people’s lives.  You don’t want to treat them like clowns..."

Costner says the people involved in the feud are "part of the American fabric.  This DNA of violence and of...in biblical proportions."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
May242012

Kevin Costner Wrote Whitney Houston About Her Drug Use, Actor Says

ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW YORK) -- Kevin Costner and the late Whitney Houston formed a unique friendship, thanks to co-starring in the 1992 romantic thriller The Bodyguard, which became the second highest-grossing film worldwide when it was released. On Thursday's Good Morning America, Costner admitted that although Houston's family asked him to give her eulogy after her death in February, he was nervous about his remarks.

"You can't be everything to everyone and how people choose to deal with it is something I was speaking to in the room," Costner said of his funeral address. "Oprah was in the room and Diane Sawyer and all those people I wish were up there speaking instead of myself. What was I going to say?"

The 57-year-old actor and director figured out exactly what to say, crafting a heartwarming eulogy that spoke of his and Houston's similarities growing up in Baptist churches. Costner also spoke of Houston's insecurities as a public figure -- anxieties that led to her drug use.

"I saw pretty much what everybody else saw," Costner said of Houston's drug use. "I was asked a couple times by closer friends of hers to write her a note. I did. ...I don't know if she ever read them."

"She was a very important person to me," Costner declared. "The world has connected us in a way that we'll never not be."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Apr142012

Kevin Costner on Houston’s Funeral, His Song for Fallen Soldiers

Arnaldo Magnani/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It has been almost two months since Kevin Costner eulogized his friend and co-star in “The Bodyguard” Whitney Houston, but only recently did he reveal that only after he was asked to speak at her funeral was he able to find the words to match his emotions.

“The way we work now, everyone needs to talk about it and people certainly wanted me to talk about it and I didn’t really have the words at that point,” Costner told ABC News’ Diane Sawyer. “Dionne Warwick called me and said, ‘would you speak?’And I could feel how broken she was and how tired she was, and I said that I would. I think the moment I said I would, I went ‘Oh my God. What have I just done?’ Because, that’s such a specific moment and to so many people and I’m thinking … why am I speaking? Why am I there?”

 

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In his speech, Costner remembered Houston as someone who shared the same interests and values. Both grew up in the Baptist church, a bond he said they shared over the years of their friendship.

Costner recalled Houston’s nervousness when she had to do a screen test for the role of singer Rachel Marron in the movie.

“The Whitney I knew was still wondering if I’m good enough. Am I pretty enough? Will they like me?” he said. “It was what made her great, and what caused her to stumble at the end.”

Costner told Sawyer that he was relieved when he finished speaking, but had one regret.

“I didn’t even go over to Whitney’s mom and everyone else went over and hugged her and I kind of went as quickly as I could to my wife and thought, man, I did that wrong,” he said. “I should have just gone over to Whitney’s mom. … I wish I could have done it differently. I wish I had gone over and given her a hug.”

Costner is now lending his words to another meaningful ceremony on April 14, helping dedicate a memorial in honor of the soldiers from the 11th  Aviation Command in Fort Knox, Ky., who were killed in the war on terror.

For the last seven years Costner has performed with his country band, Modern West, and their song, “The Angels Came Down,” struck a chord with military families who lost loved ones in the line of duty. Costner will be speaking at the event on Saturday where the song will be dedicated to all military families.

“While the song is about this last moment of a soldier’s life, it’s really a song for the living because if you’ve ever lost anybody or known anybody you’re clearly haunted by that last moment of wondering if your lost one was alone, if they were frightened, or you know if anyone was with my son,” Costner said. “This loss of a child, a husband, a daughter — we know that a song can’t heal that but … ‘When the Angels Came Down,’ that’s what we like to think, that when our loved one was suffering the most that angels covered them, taking away their fear, and took away the pain. And if we can live with that idea, I think we can all sleep a little better.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Feb182012

Kevin Costner Remembers His Friend Whitney Houston

RDA/Getty Images(NEWARK, N.J.) -- Kevin Costner’s tribute to Whitney Houston at her funeral played out like a Hollywood blockbuster: It made them laugh, cry, stand up, and cheer. He shared many anecdotes about Houston in his nearly 20-minute long speech, the most touching of which was probably recounting how he fought for her to be in their movie, The Bodyguard.

“I thought she was the perfect choice but the red flags came out immediately,” he said. “I was reminded that this would be her first acting role. You could also think about another singer, was the suggestion — maybe somebody white. Nobody ever said it out loud, but it was a fair question, it was. There would be a lot riding on this. Maybe a more experienced actor was the way to go.”

“I told everyone that I had taken notice that Whitney was black,” Costner said. “The only problem was that I thought she was perfect for what we were trying to do.”

He ended up postponing the movie for a year so that Houston could wrap up her tour and star in it. But once filming started, Costner said, her insecurities took over.

“Arguably the biggest pop star in the world didn’t think she was good enough,” he said, recounting tears on the set as Houston questioned her makeup and voice.

“Whitney, if you could hear me now, I would tell you, you weren’t just good enough, you were great,” he said. “You sang the whole damn song without a band. You made the picture what it was. A lot of leading men could’ve played my part … but you, Whitney, I truly believe you were the only one who could’ve played Rachel Marron at that time. You weren’t just pretty; you were as beautiful as a woman could be. And people didn’t just like you Whitney, they loved you.”

He offered advice on behalf of Houston to her daughter and millions of other aspiring singers.

“To you, Bobbi Kristina, and to all those young girls who are dreaming that dream, thinking that maybe they aren’t good enough, I think Whitney would tell you, guard your bodies,” he said. “And guard the precious miracle of your own life. Then sing your hearts out. ”

He choked up towards the end. “Off you go Whitney, off you go,” he said. “Escorted by an army of angels to your heavenly father. When you sing before him, don’t you worry. You’ll be good enough.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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