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Entries in Moneyball (3)

Tuesday
Jan312012

Jonah Hill Sheds Clown Image -- and Pounds

C Flanigan/FilmMagic(LOS ANGELES) -- If you saw Jonah Hill in his Oscar-nominated role in Moneyball -- or on a talk show lately -- it may be hard to believe he’s the same actor who played the overweight, wisecracking teenager in Knocked Up and Superbad.

Yes, some time has passed since those movies, but mainly Hill has reinvented himself. Or, as he told ABC's Bill Weir in an interview for Nightline, he grew up.

“I’m almost 30 years old -- I’m not a foul-mouthed seventeen-year-old kid who’s trying to get laid. … I’m an adult man who takes his work really seriously,” said Hill. “I’m an actor, I’m not a comedian, I never was a comedian.”

After Knocked Up, Forgetting Sarah Marshall and Get Him to the Greek, Hill started declining comic parts, a risk that paid off in his well-reviewed turn as Yale-educated statistics nerd Peter Brand in Moneyball.

Along with growing up, Hill has slimmed down.

“It was just mostly diet,” said Hill. “I wish there was some crazy thing that I did, like a pill or a genie or something, but it was, unfortunately, I went to see a nutritionist, and he told me what to eat to change my habits and stuff … I found that Japanese food was very helpful to me.”

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Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Sep232011

'Moneyball,' 'Dolphin Tale,' 'Abduction' and 'Killer Elite' Open Friday

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here's a look at the new movies opening nationwide Friday:

-- Moneyball: In this baseball drama, based on the best-selling book of the same name and set in 2002, Brad Pitt portrays Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane, who built a winning team by using statistical analysis to acquire undervalued players.  Jonah Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Chris Pratt and Robin Wright also star.  Rated PG-13.

-- Dolphin Tale: A marine biologist, a prosthetics doctor and a young boy work together to nurse a dolphin whose tail was damaged in a crab trap.  The film, based on a true story, is screening in 3D.  Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd, Harry Connick, Jr., and Kris Kristofferson star.  Rated PG.

-- Abduction: Taylor Lautner's Nathan is chased by killers as he tries to discover his true identity.  Lily Collins, Sigourney Weaver, Alfred Molina and Maria Bello star.  Rated PG-13.

-- Killer Elite: An ex-special ops agent teams with his mentor to take down the leader of a military society.  Jason Statham, Robert De Niro, Clive Owen and Yvonne Strahovski star.  Rated R.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Sep222011

Movie Review: ‘Moneyball’

Eric Charbonneau/WireImage(NEW YORK) -- After watching his baseball team lose its top three players to the Yankees and Red Sox, small-market baseball general manager Billy Beane must come up with a small-budget way to compete with the free-spending big-city franchises.
 
Brad Pitt plays Beane, a former first-round draft pick who never panned out. He became a scout instead, and eventually the GM of the Oakland A's. In his pursuit, he meets a young assistant for the Cleveland Indians named Peter Brand -- a Yale grad who’s an economics wiz and who believes there are mathematical formulas that can quantify a player's actual monetary value to a franchise. Brand is played by a rotund Jonah Hill, who has since lost at least a person's worth of weight and who also delivers his best performance to date. In real life, by the way, the person on whom Brand is based is a thin Harvard grad and former football player who isn’t named Peter Brand.  Chalk it up to creative license.
 
While this may not sound like the makings of a great story, Moneyball is based on a beloved best-selling book by Michael Lewis.  The film isn’t the traditional underdog story we're used to seeing -- especially when you have somebody like Brad Pitt playing the underdog -- but under the guidance of director Bennett Miller, Pitt delivers one of his better performances ... earnest, filled with nuance, subtext, charm and one of cinema's easiest emotions to overplay, regret.  But Pitt never overplays it, it's just always there.  He’s slowly morphing into his generation’s Robert Redford, and that's definitely not a bad thing.  For his part, Jonah Hill is the perfect yang to Pitt's yin.  Together, they make it hard not to get wrapped up in Moneyball, one of the better cinema sports stories of the last ten years.

Four out of five stars.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio