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Tuesday
Feb082011

Pollution Doubles Skin Damage from Sun

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(SKILLMAN, N.J.) - A new study shows that skin damage from the sun is made worse by exposure to pollution, reports WebMD.

According to researchers from Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, pollution found in urban environments can double skin damage caused by sun exposure.

"The AAD already advises people to use extra sun protection near water, snow, and sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun that can increase your chance of sunburn," said Darrell Rigel, former AAD president and clinical professor of dermatology at New York University Medical Center in New York City. "It could be that people who live in polluted areas also need extra sun protection, though that remains to be tested."

Lab tests showed that skin damaged by UV radiation showed additional signs of premature aging when exposed to additional stressors such as cigarette smoke, high heat, low temperatures, high winds and ozone.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

Unhappiness, Lack of Activity Leads to Alcohol Abuse in Women

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(GOTHENBURG, Sweden) - A new study suggests that women who participate in leisurely activities and are generally satisfied with their lives have fewer problems with alcohol.
 
A thesis study from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden found that women tend to drink more alcohol if they feel the need to cope with unhappiness in their daily lives and a lack of other activities to fill their time.

"Alcohol dependence and abuse, high alcohol consumption and high episodic drinking turned out to be most common among women who, despite having more time to themselves, are less involved in leisure activities," writes author Christina Andersson. "Being more involved and being satisfied with the various domains of everyday life, such as work, housework and leisure activities, has only a weak link to risk drinking, even for those with little time to themselves."

Andersson hopes that by identifying the factors that make women drink, more preventative measures can be reached.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

ADHD in Children Usually Means Additional Disorders

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) - A new study suggests that a majority of children who suffer from ADHD also suffer from another disorder that further affects their ability to function normally, reports WebMD.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that 70 percent of children who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder suffer from another condition, with one in five suffering from more than three other disorders.

Secondary issues identified by the researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles were mental and physical problems like learning disorders, depression, anxiety, speech or hearing problems.

“ADHD is not an inconsequential condition,” said Mark L. Wolraich, pediatrican and director of the Child Study Center. “The outcomes clearly show that they’re going to do more poorly in school; they’re going to have more accidents; and they’re going to get into more legal trouble.”

According to the study, about four million children ages six to 17 suffer from ADHD and therefore are at greater risk of suffering from additional disorders. 

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

Could Sleepwalking Be in Your DNA?

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(ST. LOUIS, Mo.) - New research may have discovered a link between sleepwalking and a person's genetic makeup, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the the journal Neurology, found that the sleep episode may be caused by a defect in a person's DNA carried on a section of the chromosome 20. The faulty chromosome can be passed down from generation to generation with a sleepwalker having a 50-percent chance of passing the DNA onto their children.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine hope the discovery could help them understand and treat the potentially dangerous condition.

Sleepwalking, which is most common in children, is a phenomenon that occurs during a deep phase of sleep where a person can sometimes perform extremely complicated tasks in a trance-like state. The condition affects around one in 50 adults.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

WHO Investigates Link Between H1N1 Vaccine and Narcolepsy

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(GENEVA, Switzerland  ) -- The World Health Organization has confirmed it is looking into the possibility that the H1N1 vaccine is linked to a rare sleeping disorder, reports the BBC.

The WHO launched its investigation after reports from at least 12 countries surfaced that there may be a link between the swine flu vaccination and narcolepsy, a condition where a person suddenly and unexpectedly falls asleep. The organization, however, says the condition has never before been linked to a vaccine.

Among those countries reporting such a link are Finland, Sweden, Iceland and the United Kingdom.

Despite the possible link, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has said that the Pandermrix vaccine is effective and should continue to be used.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

'Popular' Students are Most Aggressive Toward Classmates

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(DAVIS, Calif.) -- A new study suggests that the more "popular" a high school student is, the more aggressive he or she is toward other students.

The study, published in the journal American Sociological Review, found that a majority of aggressive interactions in schools are not the result of "troubled" or socially marginal students, but rather are tied to social hierarchy.

Researchers at the University of California in Davis studied students in the 8th, 9th and 10th grades across the state of North Carolina. The study found that the more friends a student had, the more students they victimized.

However, those at the very top and bottom of the high school social hierarchy showed the least amount of aggression toward other students, according to the study. Authors say the bottom two percent of students did not victimize others because “aggression usually requires some degree of social support, power, or influence”.  Similarly, the top two percent in popularity were also the least aggressive because “such action could signal insecurity or weakness rather than cement the student’s position."

National estimates suggest that around six million students are affected by aggression in schools each year, although the study found that a majority, 67 percent, of students do not act aggressively toward their classmates.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb082011

Without Language, Playing Field Leveled Between Humans, Primates

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(ATLANTA) -- With our extensive systems of governance and such global cooperative networks as the United Nations and the World Health Organization, humans are expert cooperators when compared with other animals or even relative primates, such as chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys.

But how much of this cooperation depends on our ability to speak?  Apparently more than you'd believe.  That is the take-away message of a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

At the core of the study was a cooperative-rewards game in which participants -- be they man, monkey or chimp -- had to work in pairs.  The game required participants to cooperate to get the biggest payout -- quarters and dollars for the humans, tasty fruit for the primates.  While there was a less-than-ideal cooperation scenario that gave each partner in a pair a quarter, "winning the game" meant figuring out which scenario offered a dollar reward at each round.

When humans were not told the rules of the game and had to figure things out nonverbally, the way their chimp and capuchin monkey primate counterparts had to, human cooperation did not far outperform that of the other primates.

"Normally, we expect to see 100 percent cooperation with humans when they know the rules of the game.  When we had them go in blind, only five pairs out of 26 developed the best scenarios of cooperation.  That's only 20 percent," said lead author Sarah Brosnan, a psychologist at the Language Research Center at Georgia State University.

Humans still outperformed the other primates, who were chosen because they were notoriously cooperative species, but the extent to which the lack of language handicapped the human pairs was surprising, Brosnan noted.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb072011

Kids' Eating Habits Affect IQ, Researchers Say

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(BRISTOL, England) -- An English study found that children who eat a diet high in fat, sugar-processed foods around the age of three show small decreases in IQ as they become older.

In the study of almost 4,000 children, the increase of processed dietary patterns could be associated with a 1.67-point decrease in IQ at just over eight years of age, according to Kate Northstone, PhD of the University of Bristol, and colleagues.

In contrast, study authors reported in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health that children who ate a more healthy diet that included salad, rice, pasta, fish, fruits and vegetables showed a 1.20-point increase in IQ.

Researchers guess that the quality of a child's diet at the age of three could be related to their level of intelligence later on because the brain's growth rate is fastest in the first three years of life.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio 

Monday
Feb072011

Study: Chocolate Has Antioxidant Power Greater Than Fruit

(HERSHEY, Penn.) -- A new study released Monday shows that your favorite guilty snack, chocolate, has antioxidant powers equal to and, in some cases, greater than certain fruits. The research show that chocolate is a bountiful source of antioxidants, polyphenols and flavanols, containing more than most fruit juices.

The researchers who conducted the study compared cocoa powders to fruit powders. While using fruits like acai berries, blueberries, cranberries and pomegranates and comparing them to cocoa powder, the latter was found to have higher antioxidant activity.

Like many mothers warn, too much of anything can be a bad thing. The study noted that cocoa products like chocolate are still high in fat and must be consumed in moderation.

Researchers from the Hershey Center For Health And Nutrition had their findings published in the online publication Chemistry Central Journal.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb072011

Support Services for Autistic Youth Diminish into Adulthood

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(ST. LOUIS) -- New research has revealed that almost 40 percent of young adults who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD) get no medical or mental health services as they transition into adulthood.

The study, published in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, showed differences along racial and socioeconomic lines as well.  African-American and poor youth (in families with household income less than $25,000) were less likely to receive services than white or middle-class youth.

"Young people with an ASD and their families are pushed off a cliff when students leave high school, where special education provides many needed services," said study author and assistant professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis, Paul Shattuck.  He added that loss of these supportive services usually means reduced opportunities for autistic adults to be "productively engaged" in their communities.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio