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Tuesday
Mar252014

Canadian Man Tests Negative for Ebola

iStock/Thinkstock(SASKATCHEWAN, Canada) --  A Canadian man who returned from Liberia with what health experts feared was the Ebola virus tested negative for it Tuesday morning, according to the World Health Organization.

Health officials have not yet confirmed what made the man ill, but his travel history, symptoms and the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea prompted officials to test, according to Dr. Denise Werker, the deputy chief medical officer of Saskatchewan.

Early Tuesday, tests confirmed he had neither Ebola, Lassa, Marburg nor Crimean Congo viruses.

“The person is hospitalized in an acute situation in an intensive care unit,” Werker said during a news conference. “This person was not ill when he traveled, and the incubation period for both Ebola hemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever can be as long as 21 days. This person was well in Canada and came down with symptoms.”

The man’s lab specimens were tested at the biosafety level 4, or BSL-4, lab in Winnipeg, Canada. A BSL-4 lab requires the most stringent safety measures because it is where researchers study diseases with no vaccines or cures.

Ebola hemorrhagic fever has no cure and is often fatal in humans and other primates. Its symptoms can take days or weeks to surface after exposure to the virus, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. They include fever, weakness and stomach pain, but some patients may also have red eyes, a rash, internal and external bleeding.

“It’s not a pleasant kind of sight when you have that kind of bleeding from a human being,” Werker said.

However, Werker said Ebola is not particularly contagious to those who are not health workers.

“You have to be in close proximity to a person’s secretions,” she said. “You actually have to touch person’s secretions, whether it is blood or nasal or saliva secretions.”

Still, the patient has been isolated, and those working with him are required to wear goggles, masks, gowns, gloves and boots, she said.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio