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Thursday
Feb272014

First Lady Dances, Works Out with...Eggplant, Broccoli and Carrot?

Let's Move!(BOWIE, Md.) -- First Lady Michelle Obama wants you to eat your vegetables. She also loves dancing. So it may not have come as a surprise when she merged those two interests Thursday, busting a move with a trio of giant, human-sized vegetable dancers.

The eggplant, carrot, and broccoli characters of "Super Sprowtz," a traveling troop promoting healthy eating in kids, met Mrs. Obama Thursday during the fourth-anniversary tour of her "Let's Move" campaign. The First Lady had traveled to La Petite Academy in the Washington suburbs to announce it would be joining 900 others from the national Learning Care Group in the adoption of new health and fitness guidelines for the children in their care. The criteria aligns with the goals of Obama's initiative, aimed at curbing childhood obesity.

Obama, characters "Colby Carrot, Brian Broccoli, Erica Eggplant" and their human friends led several dozen children in stretches and dance. She told them how important it was to eat healthy and shared their favorites: she loves spinach.

This week's anniversary has seen a flurry of activity from Let's Move. But Thursday was not the White House's first interaction with Super Sprowtz, which in addition to live shows runs a series of Web-videos for children. The group appeared at the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll and recently filmed a promotional video with White House chef Sam Kass.

Meanwhile, Learning Care Group has committed to eliminating fried foods from their meals, offering fruits and vegetables a minimum two times a day as snacks, and providing at least an hour of physical activity daily to its children, according to a press release. The group says it will also work with parents and caregivers to limit time spent in front of screens.

Thursday's announcement paired with a report this week finding obesity rates among children ages 2-5 had fallen 43 percent in the last decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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