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Entries in Ads (6)

Friday
Nov092012

PETA's Thanksgiving Ad Asks Kids Would You Eat Your Dog?

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The animal rights group PETA is planning to attack the tradition of eating turkeys on Thanksgiving by putting up billboards near schools asking kids if they would eat their pet dogs.

The group, known for its often controversial advertisements urging people to "Go vegan" or not to buy fur, intends to put up the billboards Reno, Nev., Boise, Idaho, and Sacramento, Calif.

The billboards depict a turkey with the head of a dog and the message, "KIDS: If you wouldn't eat your dog, why eat a turkey?"

PETA, which stands for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, defended targeting children in their ads.

"Children have a natural compassion for animals," said project manager Alicia Woempner. "They are also bombarded with constant fast food advertisements and we'd like to offset that negative influence with a message of kindness."

Lamar Advertising Co., a nationwide billboard company that owns outdoor ad space in Boise, confirmed to ABC News that the animal rights group requested approval of the content of the billboard and received it.

"We don't approve everything PETA sends," said Lamar spokesman Hal Kilshaw, "but we did approve this."

Kilshaw did say that some of the group's past ads have been so extreme that they must have known they'd be denied. "And when they've been denied," he said, "they have been quick to have press conferences about it in the past."

Last year PETA put up similar ads Jacksonville, Fla., and Memphis, Tenn., and this past October the ads appeared in Saskatoon for Canadian Thanksgiving.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug092012

12-Year-Old, 200-Pound Star of Nike Olympic Commercials Finds Inspiration

Nike(LONDON, Ohio) -- The star of Nike's latest Olympics ads has created his own Olympic-sized challenge.

Nathan Sorrell of London, Ohio, the 12-year-old, 200-pound star of the "Find Your Greatness" ad recently launched by the sports company, said he has taken the ad as inspiration and will find his own greatness by getting in shape.

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Sorrell was chosen to participate in the ads by Nike after they put out a casting call for a "specific type" of student, and Sorrell fit the bill, according to ABC News' Columbus, Ohio, affiliate, WSYX.

Sorrell, who is 5-foot-3 and describes himself as someone who doesn't enjoy running, was filmed running down a lone highway for the cameras of the Nike commercial. He told WSYX that he ran roughly 70 yards about 55 times.

"I just kind of put the hatred of running to the side because it was just an experience," Sorrell said. "It was so fun."

Sorrell stopped during the first take because he felt so ill he had to throw up in a ditch on the side of the road. After that, he went back to running.

"I was out of breath, I took a drink, my stomach started hurting so I ran over to the side of the road and just let it go," he told WSYX.

The commercial aired Tuesday night during the Olympics. Sorrell and his mother, Monica, watched the ad and liked how it turned out.

"It's an incredible feeling as a parent to see your child on TV, let alone for Nike," said Monica Sorrell. "The dialogue that goes with the shoot is just perfect. It's such an inspirational message."

Sorrell and his mother have decided to work together to become healthier.

The younger Sorrell started in on the promise on Tuesday:

"Went to the gym for the first day! It was fun! Hard though, but that just means its working, RIGHT?" he wrote on his Facebook page.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May222012

Introducing Humor to an Expensive Fight Over Cigarettes

Hemera/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- “I support big tobacco because they killed my wife. And that’s one less mouth to feed.”

That’s a line from a new parody commercial set to be shown during the Dancing With the Stars finale Tuesday night, put together by advocates in California who are trying to get voters to approve of a proposition that would raise a tobacco tax by a dollar to fund cancer research.

The anti-tobacco crowd says “big tobacco” will spend up to $60 million to persuade voters to oppose the tax, compared with about $3 million spent to get the proposition approved. Lance Armstrong heads the effort.

Watch the parody ad here.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb012012

British Ban Airbrushed Rachel Weisz Skincare Ad

Michael Tran/FilmMagic(LONDON) -- British regulators have banned a L’Oreal Revitalift skincare ad featuring an airbrushed close-up of Oscar-winning actress Rachel Weisz for exaggerating the product’s age-fighting effects on a woman’s complexion.

The Advertising Standards Authority ruled Wednesday that a two-page ad for L’Oreal Revitalift Repair 10, which ran in September 2011, cannot reappear “in its current form” because the black-and-white image of Weisz misrepresented what the product could do for a woman’s skin. The English beauty, variously reported to be 40 or 41, took home an Academy Award for her role in the 2005 film The Constant Gardener.

In a ruling against the world’s largest cosmetics company, the agency said it took into consideration “that consumers were likely to expect a degree of glamour in images for beauty products” and that advertisers would be “keen to present their products in their most positive light using techniques such as post-production enhancement and the re-touching of images.”

The agency called that approach “acceptable so long as the resulting effect was not one which misleadingly exaggerated the effect that the product was capable of achieving.”

“Although we considered that the image in the ad did not misrepresent the luminosity or wrinkling of Rachel Weisz’s face, we considered that the image had been altered in a way that substantially changed her complexion to make it appear smoother and more even,” the authority wrote.

The ruling came in response to a complaint filed by Jo Swinson, a Scottish member of Parliament and co-founder of the Campaign for Body Confidence. Swinson, a former marketing manager, chairs a Parliamentary inquiry into causes and consequences of body image anxiety. She has succeeded with other complaints about misleading ads for cosmetics brands owned by L’Oreal. Last July, the ASA banned ads for Lancome’s Teint Miracle foundation featuring actress Julia Roberts and for Maybelline’s The Eraser foundation featuring supermodel Christy Turlington.

L’Oreal stands by the effectiveness of its product. It issued the following statement, as reported by MSNBC: “We believe that the image in the advertisement is a true representation of Rachel Weisz. The product claims are based on extensive scientific research which proved that the product improves 10 different signs of skin aging. We therefore do not believe that the ad exaggerates the effect that can be achieved using this product.”

In another ruling Wednesday, the ASA rejected complaints that a L’Oreal moisturizer ad featuring film legend Jane Fonda had been “significantly modified.” Fonda, 74, who has appeared in an ad for L’Oreal Paris Age Re-Perfect Pro Calcium, in 2010 admitted undergoing “work” on her eyes, chin and neck, and reportedly had undergone an earlier facelift. She made a dazzling appearance as a presenter at this year’s Golden Globes awards, drawing wows from actor-director George Clooney, who said: “My God, she looked great, didn’t she?”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb012012

'Knock Off’ the Hate Speech, Says LGBT Super Bowl Ads

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- For the first time ever, gay-rights advocates will launch a sassy advertising campaign aimed at football fans in the most macho of American venues -- the Super Bowl.

Four award-winning public service announcements feature various celebrities telling teens to “knock it off” when they overhear them using the ubiquitous line, “That’s so gay.”

The videos will be strategically placed on a screen at the entrance of Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind., to be viewed by Super Bowl ticketholders on Feb. 5.

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In its newest ad, GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network, has garnered cooperation from the NBA and Phoenix Suns stars Grant Hill and Jared Dudley. The NBA is the first professional sports league to address antigay language among teens.

The campaign -- Think Before You Speak -- was created by ArnoldNYC and Toronto-based Grazie Media donated the airtime. The PSAs were funded by GLSEN, whose mission it is to ensure safe schools for all students.

Launched in 2009, the PSAs coincide with national concern about homophobia and school bullying and have received accolades from the Ad Council.

“The casual use of ‘That’s so gay’ is very common and rampant and often leads to more overt forms of harassment,” said GLSEN spokesperson Andy Marra. “This audience may not even see it as a problem.”

The first three videos have been distributed to local markets and have generated more than 387 million impressions and $25 million in donated ad time, according to GLSEN.

“It’s a new audience for us to reach,” said Marra. “The tone and feel is a good fit. The ads are not confrontational -- but very disarming and spark a conversation. That is the intention.”

Think Before You Speak features humorous TV PSAs with celebrities interrupting teenagers who use the term “that’s so gay.”

In one video, celebrity Hilary Duff switches the tables on two girls picking out dresses in a store, scolding them for equating gay with “bad.” In another, Wanda Sykes chastises adolescent teens eating at a pizza restaurant.

Last year, GLSEN unveiled its sports project, “Changing the Game,” which specifically addressed name-calling and bullying in physical education and sports settings.

“LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender) athletes are in school and we want them to feel safe and come out and be open and honest about who they are. It's a challenge because of the climate in many PE settings,” said Marra.

According to GLSEN’s 2009 National School Climate survey, three-quarters of LGBT students hear slurs such as “faggot” or “dyke” frequently or often at school and nine in 10 report hearing anti-LGBT language frequently or often. Homophobic remarks such as “that’s so gay” are the most commonly heard type of biased remarks at school.

Research shows that these slurs are often unintentional and simply a part of the teens’ vernacular. Most do not recognize the consequences, according to GLSEN.

Ad Council research found that the campaign has shown a shift in attitudes and behaviors among teens and their language.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jan032012

'Stop Sugarcoating' Child Obesity Ads in Georgia Draw Controversy

Courtesy Children's Healthcare of Atlanta(ATLANTA) -- "Being fat takes the fun out of being a kid," read graphics of a TV ad in which a young girl tells of how she doesn't like going to school because she's bullied over her weight. It is part of a video and print campaign to combat childhood obesity in Georgia, which has one of the highest childhood obesity rates in the nation.

But could the ads end up stigmatizing overweight kids instead of solving the problem?

"Blaming the victim rarely helps," said Dr. Miriam Labbok, director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "These children know they are fat and that they are ostracized already."

Some public health experts fear Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's Strong4Life campaign is too blunt to cultivate action. Still, the group is standing by its decision to feature the ads to raise awareness about childhood obesity.

"We needed something that was more arresting and in your face than some of the flowery campaigns out there," said Linda Matzigkeit, senior vice president of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

An estimated one million children in Georgia are considered overweight, ranking the state second in the nation for childhood obesity.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta chose the straightforward approach after its survey of two towns in Georgia found that 50 percent of parents did not know childhood obesity was a problem, and 75 percent of parents with obese children did not think their child was overweight.

"If we do not wake up, this will be disastrous for our state," said Matzigkeit.

She said the health system often sees children come in with adult health issues like heart disease and joint pain that can be attributed to their weight.

"We are hearing parents say that it's time we do something about it," she said.

But certain variations of the ads may not be doing much to fix the problem, some experts argued. They pointed to one print ad, in particular, that says, "It's hard to be a little girl if you're not."

"While guilt and fear are motivators, they have to be meted out with the answer to the situation," Labbok said. "The ads with the children do not offer help to them."

According to health communication experts, successful public health campaigns offer a clear call to action.  Labbok says the Georgia ads address the problem, but don't give viewers a clear solution.

"There is no mention about what a parent can do other than to say 'stop sugarcoating the problem,'" said Dr. Lori Feldman-Winter, professor of pediatrics at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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