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Entries in Attack (4)

Friday
Mar012013

Man Survives Brutal Beating to Become Marathon Runner

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Runners usually celebrate a race after crossing the finish line, but for Bryan Steinhauer, just being able to stand at the starting line is a victory.

Five years after a brutal attack left him comatose and unlikely to walk again, the 26-year-old Steinhauer will join thousands of runners during April's New York City half-marathon.

In 2008 Steinhauer was just a few weeks shy of graduating from Binghamton University when he was attacked by Binghamton basketball player Miladin Kovacevic in a bar off campus. During the attack Kovacevic kicked and stomped on Steinhauer's head, fracturing his skull in multiple places and putting him in a coma that lasted months.

Kovacevic fled the country for his homeland of Serbia, where he ended up pleading guilty to “inflicting severe bodily harm” on Steinhauer. He was sentenced to 27 months in jail in 2010.

Steinhauer’s recuperation has been arduous. Waking up from the coma was just one step on his long road to recovery. Due to severe brain damage, he had to learn to walk and talk again.

But it was his time in physical therapy that put him on the path to running a half-marathon.

“My first time running was in physical therapy, just trying to walk at a good pace,” Steinhauer told ABC station WABC-TV. “After my physical therapy I just kept it up at the treadmill at the gym. Then I came to the park, the beautiful park, and said ‘Cool, I’ll run here.’”

Running 13.1 miles is just the start of Steinhauer’s racing aspirations. This fall he plans on joining more than 40,000 runners for the New York Marathon, which has a 26-mile course.  He is also raising money for “Minds Over Matter,” a foundation he established at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York to help people who have suffered traumatic brain injury.

“I’m a success story, I’m not a victim,” Steinhauer said. “So here I am to prove it to you. To prove it to the world.”

 

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jul242012

Bee Attack Sends Two Californians to the Hospital

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(INDIO, Calif.) -- Angry bees swarmed two people in Indio, Calif. Tuesday morning, sending them to the hospital with almost 200 stings in all.

Dr. Wesley Burks, who chairs the University of North Carolina’s pediatrics department and has a 30-year career that involves working with skin allergies, said an attack like that is rare. If fact, he’s never seen one firsthand.

“Generally, you see somebody stung once or maybe five to ten times, but not 80 or 100,” Burks said. “I’ve talked to people that have seen them … but it’s less than a handful.”

A gardener in Indio, whose name was not released, was trimming a palm tree just before 7 a.m. local time, when he apparently irritated the bees and prompted them to swarm around him, said Matt Kotz, a Riverside County firefighter, in an interview with ABC News. The homeowner, an elderly woman, came out to help, but the bees attacked her as well.

When Kotz and the other firefighters arrived, the bees were still attacking the victims on the ground, Kotz said. He said he watched as another crew sprayed the bees with water to fight them off.

The bees stung the woman more than 100 times, and they stung the homeowner more than 80 times, according to the Riverside County Fire Department.

Burks said a large number of stings like this can often lead to anaphylactic shock -- even if the patient is not allergic to bee stings.

Each sting releases proteins into the victim’s body, causing swelling and eventually resulting in a histamine reaction -- as if the body were reacting to an allergy. Sometimes, that swelling can even affect the victim’s ability to breathe, Burks said.

Burks said bee stings generally affect people the same way, regardless of age, but conditions like hypertension and diabetes can make it harder to respond and recover.

No firefighters were injured because they wore gloves and bee hoods in addition to their helmets, Kotz said.

Although firefighters are trained to kill bees with the same foam they use to put out fire, Kotz said the bees were left alone after the attack.

“We didn’t want to kill the swarm,” Kotz said. “Obviously bees do good to the environment … and they weren’t actively stinging.”

He said the bees were on private property and posed no risk once the attack ended. The fire department left it up to the homeowner to decide whether to remove them.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug112011

New Face of Chimpanzee Attack Victim Revealed

Charla Nash is seen after her May, 2011, face transplant at the hospital. (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Lightchaser Photography)(NEW YORK) -- The new face of Charla Nash, the Connecticut woman who was mauled by a chimpanzee two years ago, was revealed for the first time Thursday.

The photos of Nash were first shown on NBC's Today show Thursday morning and were later released by Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital, where the surgery was performed in late May.

Nash is still recovering from the grueling 20-hour surgical marathon by a team of more than 30 doctors and nurses. An attempt to give her a pair of new hands failed, and the transplanted hands were removed.

Nash, 57, was helping her friend, Sandra Herold, lure her pet chimp Travis inside when the 200-pound animal ripped off her nose, lips, eyelids and hands before being shot and killed by police.

Since the 2009 attack that also left her blind, Nash wore a straw hat with a veil to cover her injuries, but revealed her mangled face on a November 2009 episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show.

Before the transplant, the woman’s family says Nash had to eat pureed food through a straw. Now, she will be able to eat and is looking forward to a trip to the family's hot dog stand in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Nash desperately wanted a simultaneous face and hand transplant -- a procedure that has been done only once before in France, and that patient later died. The procedure is complicated because of the precision and coordination necessary, and the increased risk of complications. Nash developed pneumonia and kidney failure after the transplant, which hampered circulation to the hands.

The hands and face both came from the same donor, but the hand transplant failed and they had to be removed, the doctors said. But Pomahac said the team "could transplant the hands again should a suitable donor be identified."

Nash is the third person to undergo a face transplant at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dallas Wiens received the nation's first face transplant patient there in March.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun102011

Charla Nash Gets Face Transplant After Chimp Attack

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A team of more than 30 doctors and nurses have carried out a face transplant for Charla Nash, the Connecticut woman who was mauled by her friend's pet chimpanzee in 2009. An attempt to give her a pair of new hands failed, and the transplanted hands were removed.

Nash, 57, was helping Sandra Herold lure her pet chimp Travis inside when the 200 pound animal ripped off her nose, lips, eyelids, and hands before being shot and killed by police.

Since the attack, Nash wore a straw hat with a veil to cover her injuries, but revealed her mangled face on a November 2009 episode of Oprah.

The date of the transplant will not be released to protect the donor's identity, but officials at Brigham and Women's Hospital said it occurred in late May. The 20-hour surgery was fraught with complications, according to John Orr, a spokesman for the Nash family.

Nash is the third person to undergo a face transplant at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dallas Wiens received the nation's first face transplant patient there in March.

The only other known simultaneous face and hands transplant was performed in France in 2009, and that patient later died.

Herold's 911 call offered a haunting description of the violent attack. Herold can be heard screaming that the ape had killed her friend and was "eating her."

"The chimp killed my friend," Herold screamed. "Send the police with a gun. With a gun!"

The dispatcher later asks, "Who's killing your friend?"

"My chimpanzee," she cries. "He ripped her apart! Shoot him, shoot him!"

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio