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Entries in Cellphone (5)

Friday
Oct142011

Cellphones Harbor Dangerous Bacteria: Researchers

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- It’s a variation on an old theme: wash your hands...and your cellphone, too!

A study conducted by two leading London universities finds that poor hygiene can lead to dirty, germ-infested -- and perhaps dangerous -- cellphones.

“If your hands are really dirty, there's a good chance that you phone is going to be really dirty,” said Dr. Ron Cutler from the University of London.

After swabbing nearly 400 phones, researchers found that one in six devices on average harbored E. coli bacteria, something that can easily be picked in the bathroom if you don't wash your hands properly.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct052011

Texting Can Double a Driver's Reaction Time, Study Finds

Hemera/Thinkstock(COLLEGE STATION, Texas) -- We've all been told texting while driving is very dangerous, but a new study released Wednesday finds it's even worse than you might think.

The Texas Transportation Institute found that texting behind the wheel can more than double a driver's reaction time, whether sending or receiving a text message.  Drivers who didnt't text were found to react between one and two seconds, while drivers who did took at least three to four seconds.

Most texting-related accidents in the U.S. involve teenagers who, the institute says, die in traffic accidents by numbers that would fill a commercial airliner every week for a year.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun032011

Cellphone Makers Already Warn About Radiation Exposure

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The World Health Organization's conclusion this week that low-level radiation from cellphones possibly causes cancer should have come as no surprise to anyone who reads the user manual. Placing cellphones in the same category as lead and engine exhaust, the director of the WHO's cancer research arm said in a statement: "Given the potential consequences for public health … it is important to take pragmatic measures to reduce exposure."

But virtually every major cellphone maker already recommends that users take precautions. Somewhere in their user manuals are instructions for customers to keep their phones away from their bodies to avoid exceeding Federal Communications Commission exposure limits.

Researchers at Washington, D.C.-based, nonprofit Environmental Working Group examined more than a dozen of the most popular models. Below are the results, which were based on tests that assumed callers were using a belt holster. The government has yet to test for phones carried in jacket or pants pockets, the way most users carry them. It's one of many questions the science has yet to answer definitively.

Palm Pixi: "To ensure compliance with RF exposure guidelines the phone must be used with a minimum of 1.5 cm (0.6 in.) separation from the body. Failure to observe these instructions could result in your RF exposure exceeding the relevant guideline limits."

HTC Droid Incredible: "To comply with RF exposure requirements, a minimum separation distance of 1.5 cm [0.6 inch] must be maintained between the user's body and the handset, including the antenna."

Apple iPhone (16 GB): "When using iPhone near your body for voice calls or for wireless data transmission over a cellular network, keep iPhone at least 15 mm (5/8 inch) away from the body."

HTC Evo 4G: "To comply with RF exposure requirements, a minimum separation distance of 1.5 cm [0.6 inch] must be maintained between the user's body and the handset, including the antenna."

LG Quantum: "This device was tested for typical body-worn operations with the back of the phone kept 0.79 inches (2 cm) between the user's body and the back of the phone. To comply with FCC RF exposure requirements, a minimum separation distance of 0.79 inches (2 cm) must be maintained between the user's body and the back of the phone."

Samsung Epic 4G: "If you do not use a body-worn accessory, ensure the antenna is at least 7/16 inch (1.5 centimeters) from your body when transmitting."

Motorola Droid 2 Global: "If you do not use a body-worn accessory supplied or approved by Motorola, keep the mobile device and its antenna at least 2.5 centimeters (1 inch) from your body when transmitting."

Samsung Captivate I897: "For body-worn operation, this phone has been tested and meets FCC RF exposure guidelines when used with an accessory that contains no metal and that positions the mobile device a minimum of 1.5 cm [0.6 inch] from the body."

Nokia 3720 Classic: "This device meets RF exposure guidelines when used either in the normal use position against the ear or when positioned at least 1.5 centimeters (5/8 inch) away from the body."

Blackberry Torch 9800: "If you do not use a holster equipped with an integrated belt clip supplied or approved by RIM when you carry the BlackBerry device, keep the BlackBerry device at least 0.98 in. (25 mm) from your body when the BlackBerry device is transmitting."

Motorola W385: "When using any data feature of the mobile device, with or without an accessory cable, position the mobile device and its antenna at least 2.5 centimeters (1 inch) from your body."

Sanyo Katana II: "If you do not use a body-worn accessory, ensure the antenna is at least 2.2 centimeters [0.86 inch] from your body when transmitting."

Motorola Boost i290: "If you do not use a body-worn accessory supplied or approved by Motorola and are not using the radio product in the intended use positions along side the head in the phone mode or in front of the face in the two-way radio mode — or if you hang your device from a lanyard around your neck — keep the device at least 2.5 centimeters (1 inch) from your body when transmitting."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Apr282011

Smartphone Users: 33% Would Give Up Chocolate Before Phones

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Smartphone users love their phones so much, a full one-third would give up chocolate in order to keep using their devices.  That’s according to a new survey commissioned by Google of 5,013 U.S. adult smartphone users.

Additional stats from the survey:

  • 81 percent use their smartphones to browse the Internet.
  • 72 percent use their devices while involved in other media.
  • One in five would give up cable TV in order to keep their smartphones.
  • 33 percent use smartphones while watching TV.
  • 22 percent use smartphones while reading the newspaper.
  • 79 percent use smartphones to help with shopping, with 70 percent using it while in the store.
  • Nine out of 10 users have made a purchase because of a mobile ad received on their smartphone.
  • 95 percent use smartphones to find local information, such as nearby pizza shops and movie times.
  • 48 percent use smartphones to watch videos.
  • One in 3 users would give up chocolate to keep using their smartphone.
  • The average smartphone user spent $300 ordering items online with their device.  Twenty-seven percent or those orders were made through a mobile website and 22 percent were made through apps.

The survey, which was reported by TechCrunch.com, also found that 39 percent of smartphone owners use the devices while in the bathroom.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Mar222011

When Sexting Goes Viral Teens Suffer the Consequences

Goodshoot RF/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The proliferation of cellphones equipped with video cameras has made shooting and sending x-rated videos easier than ever for teenagers. The world of "sexting" -- sending sexually explicit text messages -- amongst teens that was once limited to raunchy words and pictures is increasingly moving into the video domain -- with devastating consequences.

According to a 2008 study by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, more than one in five teenage girls have sent or posted nude images of themselves.

The pressure to send illicit material is also beginning at shockingly young ages.

"I was asked for a picture in seventh grade," said 15-year-old high school student Jessica Pereira.

The explicit images are often made between teens in a relationship, but after the teens break up the videos can go viral.

When 16-year-old Julia Kirouac broke up with her boyfriend last fall, he shared the sexy images she says he pressured her into making for him. The humiliation sent Julia into a deep depression and in early February Julia downed a bottle of pills in an attempt to kill herself. She spent a week in the hospital recovering. Now, she says, she's learned a powerful lesson she wants to share with other teens.

"I just want them to know that they don't have to do anything that they don't want do," Julia said fighting back tears. "And if they think that they need to send pictures or videos, whatever it is, to a guy that they're dating or that they like, it's not worth it at all.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio