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Entries in Date Rape (2)

Tuesday
Dec112012

Smart Cups Detect Date Rape Drugs

Drink Savvy(NEW YORK) -- Drink Savvy, a Boston-based company, has created a material that changes color when it comes in contact with a drug-spiked drink.

Founder Mike Abramson said he plans to use the discovery to create a set of products, including cups, glassware, stirrers and straws, that he hopes will be used to help reduce date rape.

“Within the past three years, three of my very close friends and myself have been the unwitting victims of being drugged,” Abramson said in a fundraising video.

The company is trying to raise $50,000 so it can produce the cups and straws and begin selling them online, according to a fundraising appeal posted on the website Indiegogo.

Date rape drugs, including the three most common -- GHB, Ketamine and Rohypnol -- are odorless, colorless and tasteless, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, making them difficult to detect.

Abramson estimates that more than a million people every year are drugged and sexually assaulted.  In the video he said he hopes his product will “prevent someone you care about from possibly being the victim of drug-facilitated sexual assault.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Aug052011

Scientists Developing Date Rape Drug Detector

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(TEL AVIV, Israel) -- A quick stir of your drink could soon reveal whether it's been spiked with date rape drugs, researchers say.

Israeli scientists say they've developed a sensor that looks like a straw or a stirrer that can detect two of the most commonly used date rape drugs with 100 percent accuracy.

"It samples a very small volume of the drink and mixes it with a testing solution," said Fernando Patolsky, chemistry professor at Tel Aviv University and co-creator of the device. "That causes a chemical reaction that makes the solution cloudy or colored, depending on the drug."

The reaction then turns on a tiny red light, alerting users in even the dingiest bars to ditch the drink.

Patolsky said the device should cost less than a drink and could be used multiple times until it reacts with a drug. It currently detects GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyric acid) and ketamine. But the team hopes to add Rohypnal -- "roofies" -- to the list within the year.

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) estimates that one in six women will be sexually assaulted in her lifetime, with 73 percent of victims knowing their assailants.

But the use of GHB, ketamine and Rohypnol -- powerful sedatives that are odorless, colorless and tasteless -- is actually very low, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio