SEARCH

Entries in Drug Test (2)

Tuesday
Jul102012

Olympian Hope Solo Warned After Positive Drug Test

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- U.S. soccer star Hope Solo says she had no idea a prescription drug she took for "pre-menstrual purposes" contained a diuretic on the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's prohibited list.

"Once informed of this fact, I immediately cooperated with USADA and shared with them everything they needed to properly conclude that I made an honest mistake, and that the medication did not enhance my performance in any way," Solo, the 30-year-old goalkeeper from Seattle, said in a statement.

A sample of Solo's urine collected on June 15 tested positive for canrenone, a prohibited diuretic, according to the USADA.  But when her doctor-prescribed medication was found to contain canrenone in therapeutic doses, she was given a public warning instead of a suspension.

"As someone who believes in clean sport, I am glad to have worked with USADA to resolve this matter and I look forward to representing my country at the 2012 Olympic Games in London," she said.

Because banned substances can be found in prescription and over-the-counter drugs as well as dietary supplements, the USADA urges athletes to do their research before taking them.  The agency runs educational sessions, distributes easy-reference wallet cards and manages a hotline to answer athletes' questions.  And if an athlete needs to take a medication that contains a substance on the prohibited list, they can apply for permission.

"As in all cases, we thoroughly investigate the circumstances and always do what is fair and right for clean athletes and the integrity of sport," USADA chief executive officer Travis Tygart said in a statement.

Solo is one of 14 American athletes to receive a sanction under United States Olympic Committee's anti-doping policies this year, according to the USADA.  She is one of three athletes to avoid suspension.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jul192011

Mother Loses Custody of Infant over Poppy Seeds?

Zedcor Wholly Owned/Thinkstock(NEW CASTLE, Pa.) -- Eileen Bower of Pennsylvania is suing the Lawrence County Department of Children and Youth Services for taking custody of her newborn son after she tested positive for opiates, a result -- her lawyer says -- of her eating poppy seeds.

Stanley T. Booker, Bower's attorney, told ABC News that Bower gave birth to her son on July 13, 2009.  A routine blood test performed by Jameson Hospital uncovered the presence of opiates in her system.

"They contacted Lawrence County Children and Youth Services and got a court order to take custody of her child on July 15," Booker said.  Bower regained custody of her child 75 days later.

But before giving birth, Bower ate a salad with dressing that contained poppy seeds, which Booker believes led to the positive test result.

"There were only trace amounts of opiates -- they couldn't even put a range on the amount," Booker explained.

After the initial blood test, the hospital sent the blood to an outside laboratory to confirm the result, which came back the same.

"But even before the confirmatory test results, they contacted CYS and there was an order to take custody," Booker said.

Neither Jameson Hospital nor the Department of Children and Youth Services returned phone calls from ABC News, but according to the American Civil Liberties Union's web site, the hospital's policy is to perform drug tests on all new mothers and submit positive results to the Department of Children and Youth Services.

Both Jameson Hospital and the county's child protection agency are involved in a nearly identical case involving another woman whose child was taken as a result of a positive drug test.  Elizabeth Mort said she ate an everything bagel with poppy seeds on it shortly before she gave birth to her daughter.  She filed her lawsuit last October.

Toxicologists said that if trace amounts of opiates were found in Bower's blood, they didn't necessarily come from poppy seeds.

"It depends on the nature of the hospital's test, but when it comes to poppy seeds, you would have to eat a lot more than salad dressing to get a positive presumptive test," said Chip Walls, director of the Forensic Toxicology Laboratory at the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine.

"A positive blood test is more than likely not from consuming poppy seeds, but it's not out of the question," said Bruce Goldberger, director of toxicology at the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville.

Both experts emphasized that it didn't mean there was an illegal drug present, either.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio