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Entries in Enema (2)

Friday
Feb082013

Florida Couple Addicted to Coffee Enemas, Up to Four Times a Day

TLC(NEW YORK) -- Mike and Trina swear by their coffee. He enjoys a "saturated" blend, which is "on the cold side"; she prefers a fine espresso grind that is "warm and thicker."

The St. Petersburg, Fla., couple refuses to drink the caffeinated beverage, which they say is bad for their health.  Instead, they use it as an enema.  They each have at least 100 coffee enemas a month, 6,000 in all since their addiction began two years ago.

"I started the whole debacle," Trina, who did not want to reveal her last name, told ABC News.  "Then it took on a life of its own.  I twice tried to stop and felt worse, so I do this every day and as much as I can.  But it's very time-consuming."

"I love the way it makes me feel," she said.  "It gives me a sense of euphoria."

The couple admits they perform their caffeinated enema at least four times a day. Once, Trina said she did "nine or 10" in a 24-hour period.

Her husband Mike, 45, said he initially thought, "Oh my god, how disgusting," but then he tried it, "and now I am addicted."

TLC may have outdone itself in the fourth season of My Strange Addiction, which always carries the warning "do not attempt" this at home.  The couple heats up the coffee on the stove and injects the liquid into their colons to clean out their lower intestines.

In its premiere of the first of eight new episodes on Feb. 13 at 10 p.m. ET, the show will also highlight Lisa, a middle-aged woman from Detroit who eats cat fur, grooming her pet with her own tongue.  In subsequent episodes, a woman is addicted to bee stings and another one inhales more than 30 jars of vapor rub every week.  In the season finale, a woman is addicted to drinking blood.

As for Mike and Trina, for the past two years they have been "unable to function" without their coffee enema, a ritual that takes five hours of planning and executing each day.

The habit began after Trina had a series of issues with her health.

"I had a lot of stomach problems, digestive problems with my kidney and my liver," she said.  "I started research and it led into coffee enemas and I really started to feel the benefit.  I felt like I was living for the first time in years."

When she stopped the coffee enemas recently, Trina said she ended up the emergency room with kidney stones.  Neither Trina nor her husband had, up until then, visited a doctor in years.  

Caffeine can cause problems with dehydration and high blood pressure.  Her family worries they will have a heart attack.

But will they quit?  "Not a chance," said Mike.

Dr. Roshini Rajapaksa, assistant professor of medicine and a gastroenterologist at NYU Medical Center, said she would never recommend coffee enemas.

"There's a down side and really no up side to it," she said.

Sometimes known as Gerson therapy, coffee enemas and other cleansing rituals purport to improve health and even fight cancer -- claims that are false, according to Rajapaksa.

"They claim it's a way of detoxifying and might even be an alternative to cancer treatment," she said.  "There is definitely no evidence and I would hate for someone to forego [proven medical] treatment."

"The bottom line is there is not any beneficial effect and there is some risk associated with any enema and, in particular, using coffee," said Rajapaksa.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Monday
May162011

Diarrhea, Digestive Ills Relieved With Fecal Transplants

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Demonstrating that even in medicine, "one man's trash is another man's treasure," patients with debilitating diarrhea are finding relief, if not cures, after receiving bacteria-rich stool from the guts of healthy donors, usually close relatives.

Despite the gross-out factor, fecal transplants are simple enough to perform at home using such inexpensive tools as a bottle of saline, a two-quart enema kit from the local drugstore and a standard kitchen blender.

The approach, also called fecal bacteriotherapy, is hardly new.  Dr. Ben Eiseman, the longtime chief of surgery at Denver General Hospital, reported in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology in 1958 that enemas containing feces from healthy colons successfully replenished good digestive bacteria in patients suffering from pseudomembranous colitis, a painful colon inflammation associated with a bacterium called Clostridium difficile.

Dr. Thomas J. Borody, from the Centre for Digestive Diseases in Sydney, Australia, reported in the same journal in 2003 that "human probiotic infusions" reversed ulcerative colitis in six patients, each of whom had been sick at least five years with the inflammatory condition.  All remained disease-free in one to 13 years of follow-up.

In recent years, the number of chronic infections with C. diff has increased, often from prolonged antibiotic use and growing antibiotic resistance, especially among the elderly and those in hospitals and long-term care facilities.  That has driven renewed interest in fecal transplantation, although it's still not covered by health insurance plans.

North American gastroenterologists and infectious disease experts, mindful that the technique has been used in Europe, have been offering it as last-ditch therapy for patients wasting away from debilitating diarrhea that hasn't responded to even the most powerful and most expensive antibiotics, such as vancomycin.

Doctors infuse patients' colons using an enema or colonoscope (and sometimes the stomach using a nasogastric tube) with solutions of water or saline spiked with donor feces that have been screened for parasites, HIV, hepatitis, and other illness-causing microbes.  They suggest donors should be someone you know and trust, like a spouse, a parent or a child, although a few institutions are experimenting with donations collected from healthy men or women who have been tested and found free of major diseases.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio