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Entries in fans (2)

Monday
Sep192011

UAB Psychologist Warns Fans of 'Football Addiction'

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) -- A psychologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham says there is a fine line between a dedicated fan and a football addict when it comes to following one of America's most popular sports.

With the football season in full swing, researchers at the UAB School of Public Health say fans need to be careful of crossing the fine line between fandom and obsession. In a university news release, Dr. Josh Klapow warns that football obsession can threaten people's relationships and quality of life.

"It's not how much time you spend watching football that matters, it's whether or not that is causing negative behaviors in your life. Whether it's 10 hours per week or 40, the issue is its effect on your real-life obligations," said Klapow.

Klapow outlined several indicators that can help fans identify a potential problem. According to Klapow, behaviors such as thinking about football while doing other things, becoming irritated when a game is interrupted, missing important family or other events to watch a game, and becoming depressed, angry or violent when a certain team loses are all signs that someone has become addicted.

Klapow encourages fans to keep a weekly log of time spent watching or following sports to monitor whether or not one is becoming addicted to that sport.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jan192011

Study Finds One in 12 Are Drunk at Major Sporting Events

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Many fans lucky enough to have tickets to one of the NFL conference championship games this weekend will cheer for their team with a beer in hand, and about one in 12 will leave the stadium legally drunk, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota say people under the age of 35 were eight times more likely to be legally drunk than other attendees, and fans who tailgate in the parking lot before the game were the worst offenders -- they were 14 times more likely to leave a game intoxicated.

In an anonymous survey given by the researchers after administering a breathalyzer test, one in four tailgaters owned up to downing at least five alcoholic beverages, with those in the highest BAC range knocking back an average of 6.6 drinks.

Doug Shavel, who has tailgated at New York Jets home games in Giants Stadium for more than 10 years, agreed that tailgating and drinking seem to go hand in hand.

"Everywhere you look voluminous quantities of alcohol are being consumed," he said. "People arrive by 9 a.m. for a [1 p.m.] kickoff and they're drinking the entire time. Some continue drinking postgame while they wait for the parking lot to clear out."

Shavel has seen a lot of bad behavior in his time that can be attributed to drinking. Once a drunken fan vomited on the person sitting next to him, then later he saw someone puking in the aisles. At another event, Shavel said he saw a man who was so inebriated he had to be carried out on a stretcher with an IV attached to his arm.

In his own tailgating circle, a friend once drank until he was so drunk he fell over into a pit of hot charcoal. "That's the exception, not the rule," Shavel insisted.

In fact, the percentage of drinkers discovered by the study may seem surprising low to anyone who has ever attended a sporting event and witnessed an alcohol-fueled fist fight or someone staggering through the stands.

But lead investigator Darin Erickson, an assistant professor of epidemiology and community health at University of Minnesota's School of Public Health said the numbers match up with findings from a previous study.

"People's perception of how many people get drunk at games may be somewhat distorted. Their estimates are likely greater than the actual numbers," he said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio