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Entries in Fundraising (2)

Tuesday
Feb262013

Boy, 7, Raises More than 30,000 Dollars for Sick Friend

Courtesy David Siegel(LOS ANGELES) -- First-grader Jonah Pournazarian, 7, is best friends with Dylan Siegel, 6. Jonah has been diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type 1B, a rare liver disorder that doesn’t have a cure. Dylan decided to raise money for research to help his friend. Late last fall, he hatched a plan and approached his parents.

“We said, ‘Let’s do a lemonade stand, the typical thing,’” David Siegel, Dylan’s dad, told ABC News.

“He looked at us and said, ‘I want to write a book.’”

After just two months on the market, sales of the handwritten and illustrated book and chocolate bars have raised $30,000 and counting, David Siegel said.

Now Dylan’s goal is $1 million, his father said.

The 16-page book Chocolate Bar, uses the term to mean “cool.” “Disneyland is so chocolate bar,” the book starts out. The ending? “I like to help my friends. That is the biggest chocolate bar.”

The book and Siegel’s efforts have gotten a little help. Whole Foods has donated hundreds of chocolate bars.  A local Barnes & Noble bookstore hosted a book signing that drew 200 people, Dylan’s father said. People from states including Tennessee and Missouri have donated money to the cause via Facebook and a website. The boys appeared on CBS television show The Doctors last week, pinching each others’ cheeks as they told their story.

The money from the fund and book and chocolate sales have been sent to the University of Florida School of Medicine in Gainsville, where research is taking place under Dr. David Weinstein, who is working with 200 families.

Jonah was diagnosed with his illness when he was a baby and suffered from night sweats and low blood sugar, his father said. This genetic condition afflicts one in a million children, his father said. Most days all he eats is cornstarch mixed with chicken soup with vegetables that his mother makes and feeds him through a tube, his father said. At school, Jonah’s parents have had to ask parents of other children to keep their child home if they get sick or to at least notify Jonah’s parents so they can keep him home.

As a result of Siegel’s efforts, the rare disease has gotten national attention for the first time.

Jonah and his family couldn’t be happier.

“We never dreamed that this was going to happen,” David Siegel said. “It’s just struck a nerve and now we don’t want to stop until we’ve hit our mission.”

That’s pretty chocolate bar.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul282011

Dog Raises Over $17,000 After Running Marathon for Cancer Research

Goodshoot/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- In 2008, when his new family adopted him, Dozer the Goldendoodle was the only pup left in the litter. It made Dozer kind of an underdog. But fast forward three years to the day of the Maryland Half Marathon -- a 13-mile race for cancer research -- and this pup found his way to the front of the pack.

That was the day Dozer slipped past the virtual fence surrounding his yard as the marathon runners passed by. He got quickly caught up in the current at the 5-mile mark -- and kept up the pace for the remainder of the race, with people snapping his picture all along.

When he crossed the finish line, the bewildered pup with muddy paws turned to walk the eight miles back home, where he was awarded a finisher's medal from the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Suddenly Dozer's life story changed. A Facebook page was put together in his name to raise money for cancer research. Donations came pouring in, as did the fans. He now has 2,500 friends on the social networking site and has raised more than $17,000.

While the wonder dog seems to inspire all and gives laughs to some, his run has benefited others in the best way of all. Diane Salvatore, 55, was just diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer. She is a direct beneficiary of Dozer's fundraising -- the more than $17,000 that the pup raised has already been designated to go toward research that will help her and others like her.

"I don't think he's last anymore," said Salvatore. "I think he's come in first place. Great job to be the spokesdog for this type of research that needs to be done for this kind of breast cancer."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio