SEARCH

Entries in Health Risk (2)

Monday
Sep122011

Lifetime Risk for COPD Higher than Heart Failure, Common Cancers

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(TORONTO) -- COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It's a disease that affects your air passages, causing difficulty breathing, and now a new study suggests COPD is a greater threat than heart disease or cancer.
 
COPD covers a range of diseases that restrict the function of your lungs, such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema.
 
Symptoms include difficulty breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath and chronic coughing that produces mucus. It is sometimes mistakenly thought to be a "smoker's cough."
 
A new study in the medical journal Lancet shows that one in every four people 35 and older are likely to develop COPD in their lifetime, comparable to diabetes and asthma.
 
Researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto followed 13 million Canadians for up to 14 years.
 
They found the risk of getting COPD was double that of congestive heart failure, three to four times greater than breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men and more than seven times the risk of other cancers.  
 
By 2030, COPD is projected to be the third-most common cause of death worldwide.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jan132011

Study: Thirdhand Smoke More Hazardous Than Previously Believed

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Thirdhand smoke -- the smoke that sticks to clothing, hair and furniture -- may be more dangerous than previously believed, according to a new study from the American Chemical Society.

The study, published in ACS’ journal, Environmental Science & Technology, found that residual nicotine from thirdhand smoke can form toxic pollutants when it comes in contact with ozone in indoor air.  As a result, babies crawling on carpets, people laying on couches or people eating tainted food could be at a health risk.

Researchers for the study, which was published in ACS’ journal, Environmental Science & Technology, tested how nicotine interacted with indoor air on various materials, like cellulose and cotton, to simulate results on household surfaces.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio