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Thursday
Jun302011

Health Officials Investigating Temporary Tattoo Additive

Digital Vision/Photodisc(MINNEAPOLIS) -- They’re a hit with children and common at birthday parties, carnivals, and summer fairs. But now the Minnesota Department of Health says that an additive found in some temporary tattoos could put children at risk.

Of particular concern is the additive para-phenylenediamine (PPD), an agent used in ink known as “black henna.” Though it’s been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in hair dye, PPD has not been approved for direct application to the skin and has been known to trigger allergic reactions including intense itching, blistering and even permanent scarring in some cases.

Minnesota health officials say they’re investigating the potentially harmful effects of temporary tattoos after about half of a group of 35 Twin Cities-area eighth graders reported skin reactions.

“In most cases, the lesions appeared within 20 days of getting the tattoo, and half occurred within 7 days,” the Minnesota Health Department said Thursday in announcing the warning.

“The children were treated with creams, including steroid containing creams, and three children were given oral antibiotics. Although the material used for the tattoos was described as black in color, MDH has not determined as yet whether it contained PPD or other additives,” officials said, adding that the case “underscores the need for caution before getting a henna tattoo.”

Pure henna has not been approved by the FDA, but is commonly used to create temporary tattoos.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

They’re a hit with children and common at birthday parties, carnivals and summer fairs. But now the Minnesota Department of Health says that an additive found in some temporary tattoos could put children at risk.

 

Of particular concern is the additive para-phenylenediamine (PPD), an agent used in ink known as “black henna.” Though it’s been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in hair dye, PPD has not been approved for direct application to the skin and has been known to trigger allergic reactions including intense itching, blistering and even permanent scarring in some cases.

 

Minnesota health officials say they’re investigating the potentially harmful effects of temporary tattoos after about half of a group of 35 Twin Cities-area eighth graders reported skin reactions.

 

“In most cases, the lesions appeared within 20 days of getting the tattoo, and half occurred within 7 days,” the Minnesota Health Department said Thursday in announcing the warning.

“The children were treated with creams, including steroid containing creams, and three children were given oral antibiotics. Although the material used for the tattoos was described as black in color, MDH has not determined as yet whether it contained PPD or other additives,” officials said, adding that the case “underscores the need for caution before getting a henna tattoo.”

Pure henna has not been approved by the FDA, but is commonly used to create temporary tattoos.







ABC News Radio