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Entries in Interview (2)

Tuesday
May012012

New Facebook Tool Helps Organ Donors 'Share Life'

Rick Rowell/ABC NewsBy MARK ZUCKERBERG and SHERYL SANDBERG

Facebook is about connecting and sharing -- connecting with your friends, family and communities, and sharing information with them about your life, work, school and interests. On any given day more than half a billion people share billions of stories, updates and photos.

What has amazed us over the past eight years is how people use these same tools and social dynamics to address important issues and challenges in their communities. Last year in Missouri, Facebook users tracked down and returned treasured mementos to families who thought they'd lost everything in the Joplin tornado. In Japan, people used Facebook to locate family and friends following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Smaller acts of kindness happen millions of times a day on Facebook.

We never could have anticipated that what started as a small network would evolve into such a powerful tool for communication and problem solving. As this happens, we hope to build tools that help people transform the way we all solve worldwide social problems.

Today, more than 114,000 people in the United States, and millions more around the globe, are waiting for the heart, kidney or liver transplant that will save their lives. Many of those people – an average of 18 people per day – will die waiting, because there simply aren't enough organ donors to meet the need. Medical experts believe that broader awareness about organ donation could go a long way toward solving this crisis. And we believe that by simply telling people that you're an organ donor, the power of sharing and connection can play an important role.

Starting today, you can add that you're an organ donor to your timeline, and share your story about when, where or why you decided to become a donor. If you're not already registered with your state or national registry and want to be, you'll find a link to the official donor registry there as well.

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Facebook's mission is simple: to make the world more open and connected. But the Facebook community has also shown us that simply through sharing and connecting, the world gets smaller and better. Even one individual can have an outsized impact on the challenges facing another, and on the world. At Facebook, we call that the power of friends.

--Mark and Sheryl

Mark Zuckerberg is the founder and CEO of Facebook. Sheryl Sandberg is the company's COO.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Sep152011

Apple Juice Showdown: Dr. Oz Arsenic Claim Questioned

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- In a spirited showdown on Good Morning America Thursday, ABC News senior health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser confronted television's Dr. Mehmet Oz on what he called “extremely irresponsible” statements made on The Dr. Oz Show Wednesday concerning arsenic in apple juice.

“Mehmet, I’m very upset about this, I think that this was extremely irresponsible,” Besser said.  “It reminds me of yelling fire in a movie theater.”

“I’m not fear-mongering,” Oz fired back.  “We did our homework on this risk.”

Oz’s appearance on GMA is the latest development in a story that likely has many parents on edge about whether to continue serving apple juice to their children.

[Scroll down to watch Dr. Oz's appearance on ABC's Good Morning America.]

Oz and the show’s producers drew criticism for Wednesday’s episode of The Dr. Oz Show, which focused on the dangers of trace levels of arsenic present in many popular brands of apple juice.  Juice manufacturers, government regulators and scientists said the results of what the program called its “extensive national investigation” were misleading and needlessly frightening to consumers.

According to The Dr. Oz Show, a laboratory tested “three dozen samples from five different brands of apple juice across three American cities” and compared the levels of arsenic to the limits of arsenic for drinking water set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  They found 10 samples of juice with arsenic levels higher than the limits for water.

In a statement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said, “There is no evidence of any public health risk from drinking these juices.”

The FDA sent a letter to The Dr. Oz Show on Sept. 9 -- five days before the show was to air -- which warned that airing the show would be “irresponsible” and “misleading” because the testing ignored that there are two forms of arsenic: organic and inorganic.  Organic is generally thought not to be harmful to health, whereas inorganic is.

The FDA also conducted its own tests of the apple juice investigated by The Dr. Oz Show.  In some of the very same lots of juice tested for the show, the FDA reported finding very low levels of inorganic arsenic; six parts per billion at most, even lower than the 10 parts per billion recommended by the EPA as a safe level for drinking water.

Oz acknowledged that “no children are dying from acute lethal arsenic poisoning,” stating instead that his concerns were about the long-term effect of arsenic exposure.  Still, Besser said Oz was implying to parents that drinking apple juice poses a risk to kids’ health.

“You have informed parents they are poisoning their children,” he said, a charge that Oz denied.

“We just want to have the conversation, and we’ve been trying to make this conversation happen,” Oz said.

Oz also added, “I would not take apple juice out of my kids’ containers now.

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Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio