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Entries in Law (4)

Tuesday
May082012

The End of the School Bake Sale in Massachusetts?

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- When the PTA needs money, when the team needs new gear, when the band needs train fare, many schools turn to brownies and cookies and whatever else parents are willing to bake and sell. 

But a new law in Massachusetts may change that -- it limits access to junk food during the school day, and health officials want it expanded to cover all school activities from bake sales to the football game concession stand.  

Officials say healthy options are needed in a state where a third of school kids are overweight.

Some parents say bake sales fund what taxpayers don't.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar232012

Maryland Bill Sets Rules for Frozen Eggs, Sperm

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- A proposed bill in the Maryland legislature would make it illegal to use a dead person’s sperm or eggs to reproduce without a notarized agreement from the donor.  If the bill is passed, violators could face a $1,000 fine for a first offense.

The bill aims to clarify a legal gray area created by in vitro fertilization, a procedure introduced in the late 1970s that allows women to become pregnant using frozen sperm and eggs donated months, even years earlier. It would also allow children born within two years of a biological parent’s death to receive inheritance, as long as the parent consented.

Just this week, U.S. Supreme Court justices were divided on whether twins conceived with frozen sperm and born 18 months after their father’s death were eligible for Social Security survivor’s benefits, the Baltimore Sun reported.

“Nobody knows what’s enforceable, what’s conscionable or what makes sense,” Sen. Dolores Kelley, a Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the bill, told the Sun.

The first report of post-mortem sperm retrieval dates to 1980, and involved a 30-year-old man who was left brain dead after a car accident, according to the journal Human Reproduction. In 2010, Missy Evans of Bedford, Texas, retrieved sperm from the body of her 21-year-old son Nikolas in hope of becoming pregnant with her own grandchild.

In the 1990s, the Maryland General Assembly passed a bill banning the use of sperm from deceased donors entirely -- legislation later vetoed as an intrusion into parents’ private decisions, the Sun reported. The issue has remained largely untouched until now.

The bill applies only to donors known by the person wishing to conceive, such as a widow hoping to conceive with her late husband’s sperm. It does not apply to anonymous sperm and egg donors.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Dec192011

Supreme Court to Hold Three-Day Hearing on Health Reform Law

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside an unprecedented amount of time for lawyers arguments on the health reform law.

For three days in March, three sets of lawyers will present three arguments before the court, trying to determine whether it is too soon for a constitutional challenge to the health reform law.  As of yet, no one has been fined for failing to buy health insurance.

On March 26, the court will hear augments on whether it is too early to challenge the law, because the requirement to buy health insurance has not gone into effect yet.  March 27, the subject will be whether Congress has overstepped its authority.  The final day of arguments, March 28, will focus on the ability for the rest of the law to stand in the case that the requirement to purchase insurance is ruled unconstitutional.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jun152011

Most Men Arrested Are On Drugs, Report Says

Comstock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Most of the men arrested last year in ten participating U.S. cities were on at least one drug when apprehended, according to a report issued Wednesday by the Office of National Drug Policy.

In Chicago, 83 percent of the men arrested were found to be on drugs -- the most of any of the cities cited in the government report. In Washington, D.C., the percentage of those on drugs when arrested was 52 percent -- the lowest on the list.

[Read the entire report on the Office of National Drug Control Policy's website.]

The report says the findings highlight the link between drug use and crime and "illustrate why we must approach our Nation's drug problem as a public health and safety problem," according to Gil Kerlikowske, the director of National Drug Control Policy.

Fewer adult males tested positive for cocaine in 2010, the study found, and are instead using drugs such meth, marijuana, and oxycodone.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio