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Wednesday
Jan192011

'Teen Mom 2': Medical Reality Intrudes on MTV Reality Show

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Now here's a dose of reality. New mother Leah Messer learned in the last episode of MTV's Teen Mom 2 that one of her twins may have disabilities.

The reality star left the doctor's office crying after hearing the devastating news that her one-year-old daughter Aliannah was not growing as well as her twin sister.

On the show, Aliannah shrieks as the doctor attempts to straighten her crooked legs.

"It's pretty obvious that there are deficits," said the doctor, who could not provide more details, but immediately ordered an MRI of the child's spine. "To me, it looks like her arms are too short. She looks a little disproportioned. You see that? There certainly are things that aren't working."

He suspected a "nerve-rooted injury" could be causing the deformity.

The twins were born in an emergency Caesarian section and Aliannah was born in the breach position -- or legs first.

After the doctor's visit, Messer called Corey Simms, who is the twins' father. The couple first appeared on the prequel show, 16 and Pregnant, and were recently married.

Both MTV shows have been under heavy fire for encouraging teen pregnancy and painting an attention-getting picture of pregnancy and motherhood. Reps for MTV didn't return phone calls seeking comment.

Even the show's website acknowledges the trend: "After examining the Teen Mom and 16 and Pregnant phenomenon we can say that how eager are the young ladies to be on reality TV shows. They are not even hesitating to be pregnant to just score an audition."

But with new story lines like these, experts like Leslie Hughes, a nurse practitioner at the Teen Ob Clinic at Thomas Jefferson Hospital, says that television is "doing a better job."

"A few years ago, Hollywood glamorized teen pregnancy with girls like Britney Spears' younger sister being called, 'the little homemaker,'" she said. "I didn't think that was cute at all."

"But Teen Mom shows the harsh realities -- it's not just a dress-up doll," said Hughes. "It's a major responsibility."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio