SEARCH

Entries in L'Oreal (2)

Wednesday
Feb012012

British Ban Airbrushed Rachel Weisz Skincare Ad

Michael Tran/FilmMagic(LONDON) -- British regulators have banned a L’Oreal Revitalift skincare ad featuring an airbrushed close-up of Oscar-winning actress Rachel Weisz for exaggerating the product’s age-fighting effects on a woman’s complexion.

The Advertising Standards Authority ruled Wednesday that a two-page ad for L’Oreal Revitalift Repair 10, which ran in September 2011, cannot reappear “in its current form” because the black-and-white image of Weisz misrepresented what the product could do for a woman’s skin. The English beauty, variously reported to be 40 or 41, took home an Academy Award for her role in the 2005 film The Constant Gardener.

In a ruling against the world’s largest cosmetics company, the agency said it took into consideration “that consumers were likely to expect a degree of glamour in images for beauty products” and that advertisers would be “keen to present their products in their most positive light using techniques such as post-production enhancement and the re-touching of images.”

The agency called that approach “acceptable so long as the resulting effect was not one which misleadingly exaggerated the effect that the product was capable of achieving.”

“Although we considered that the image in the ad did not misrepresent the luminosity or wrinkling of Rachel Weisz’s face, we considered that the image had been altered in a way that substantially changed her complexion to make it appear smoother and more even,” the authority wrote.

The ruling came in response to a complaint filed by Jo Swinson, a Scottish member of Parliament and co-founder of the Campaign for Body Confidence. Swinson, a former marketing manager, chairs a Parliamentary inquiry into causes and consequences of body image anxiety. She has succeeded with other complaints about misleading ads for cosmetics brands owned by L’Oreal. Last July, the ASA banned ads for Lancome’s Teint Miracle foundation featuring actress Julia Roberts and for Maybelline’s The Eraser foundation featuring supermodel Christy Turlington.

L’Oreal stands by the effectiveness of its product. It issued the following statement, as reported by MSNBC: “We believe that the image in the advertisement is a true representation of Rachel Weisz. The product claims are based on extensive scientific research which proved that the product improves 10 different signs of skin aging. We therefore do not believe that the ad exaggerates the effect that can be achieved using this product.”

In another ruling Wednesday, the ASA rejected complaints that a L’Oreal moisturizer ad featuring film legend Jane Fonda had been “significantly modified.” Fonda, 74, who has appeared in an ad for L’Oreal Paris Age Re-Perfect Pro Calcium, in 2010 admitted undergoing “work” on her eyes, chin and neck, and reportedly had undergone an earlier facelift. She made a dazzling appearance as a presenter at this year’s Golden Globes awards, drawing wows from actor-director George Clooney, who said: “My God, she looked great, didn’t she?”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct052011

L'Oreal's 'Pill for Grey Hair' Raises Concerns

Ralf Nau/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When news broke that L'Oreal was developing a pill to prevent grey hair, it made headlines around the world. But scientists say the pill, which has not yet been formulated, produces more questions than answers.

Bruno Bernard, head of the Hair Care, Quality and Color team at L'Oreal, first spoke about the cosmetic company's research, telling the Daily Mail the pill will be based on a fruit extract that mimics an enzyme called TRP-2, which isn't present in hair follicles.

TRP-2 helps make pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. In theory, the presence of TRP-2 could prevent hair from going gray.

"Ideally you would take [the pill] for your whole life, but realistically we'd encourage people to start using it before their hair goes grey because we don't think it can reverse the process once it has started," he told the UK paper. "We have a watertight proof of concept, and we think it will have a market among men as well as women."

Dr. Jonathan Zippin, a dermatologist at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, told ABC that this kind of preventative solution to grey hair is "really difficult to prove" because some people never go grey, and others only grey a little bit.

If researchers gave the pill to someone who never got grey hair, there would be no way to know if it was because of the pill or not. In addition, there are several unanswered questions about a pill that alters pigment, Zippin noted, especially if it would affect the diagnosis of melanoma by making moles look atypical.

In a statement released Tuesday, L'Oreal briefly described its research efforts, but made no mention of a pill or the alleged 2015 release date widely reported by several media outlets.

"L'Oreal has demonstrated and published in peer-reviewed journals the protective role of the enzyme TRP-2. Its absence in hair follicle melanocytes is likely linked to progressive greying," the statement reads. "Experts in the field confirm that substances mimicking TRP-2 activity might be of value to fight hair greying."

At this point, reports of a pill to prevent grey hair seem "a little premature," according to L'Oreal spokesman Jonathan Maher.

Clearly a pill for grey hair is several years away, but with additional study, Zippin says L'Oreal's research could be "very promising."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio