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Entries in Lunch Break (1)

Monday
Apr112011

Hungry Judges More Likely to Withhold Parole

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The United States judicial system is ostensibly built on laws and hard facts. But new research lends weight to the trope that "justice is what the judge ate for breakfast."

A judge's willingness to grant a prisoner parole wanes with time after a lunch or snack break, according to an observational study.

Researchers from Columbia University in New York City and Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Beer Sheva, Israel, analyzed more than 1,000 parole decisions made during 50 days by eight experienced judges in Israel. The proportion of favorable rulings fell from about 65 percent to nearly zero during each session separated by the two food breaks, leaping back to 65 percent immediately after the breaks.

The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, suggest that prisoners whose cases were heard at the start of the day or soon after a break have an advantage over other prisoners, and that the rule- and fact-based judicial system is biased.

"It shows that experts are subject to psychological factors in their decisions just like anyone else," said study author Jonathan Levav, associate professor of business at Columbia Business School. "Judicial decision making is no different than human decision making. Judges are people."

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