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Entries in News (3)

Thursday
Oct112012

Bad News May Cause More Stress for Women than Men

Goodshoot/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When reading the morning paper, women may take bad news to heart more than their male counterparts, a new study found.

The Canadian study of 56 people found women who read negative news stories were more reactive to stressful situations later on.

“If you are reading the paper every morning while drinking your cup of coffee and have a stressful day ahead, it is important to learn stress management techniques to help you through the rest of the day,” said author Marie-France Marin, a neuroscientist at the University of Montreal and lead author of the study, published Thursday in the journal PLoS One.

Marin and colleagues measured salivary levels of the stress hormone cortisol while study subjects were reading the news, and then again later during stressful tasks, such as a mock job interview or a math quiz.

Women who read negative news stories had higher cortisol levels than those who read neutral stories, according to the study.  They were also more likely to remember the negative details.

The finding did not hold true for men.

Dr. Redford Williams, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University in Durham, N.C., said the study findings make sense.

“Women typically are more sensitive to others’ emotions,” he said.  He suggested the stress response has evolved to ensure survival of a woman’s offspring.

But Williams said women -- or men, for that matter -- who worry that the news is affecting their stress levels should ask themselves four simple questions:

  • Is the news important to me?
  • Are my feelings appropriate, and would another person be having these thoughts?
  • Is the situation modifiable and is there anything I can do to improve or change it?
  • Is it worth it to me to get involved in this story?

If the answer is no, Williams recommends letting the negative thought go.  Instead, repeat a positive thought or meditate, he said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb242012

Denver News Anchor Bitten by Dog: 'Having a Baby Hurt More'

Denver Post(DENVER) -- The Colorado news anchor who was bitten by a rescued dog live on the air told the Denver Post in her first interview that the first thought she had after the dog bit her was, "I'm bleeding, and it had to be on television."

Kyle Dyer, a veteran morning news anchor for NBC News' Denver affiliate KUSA, was reporting an uplifting story of a dog rescued from a frozen reservoir on Feb. 8.

When Dyer bent down to kiss the dog's nose, the 85-pound Argentine Mastiff named Max turned his head and bit into Dyer's face as his owner and rescuer watched in disbelief.

"It was a fluke, it happened," Dyer told the Denver Post. "It could have been so much worse. Not once was I afraid or scared. Yeah, it hurt, but having a baby hurt more."

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Dyer received 70 stitches and had her mouth stitched shut so that she could heal. A plastic surgeon grafted skin from her lower lip to build her a new upper lip, the Denver Post reported.

"We all think we know how to pet a dog, but we don't. You know, I don't, obviously," Dyer said. "By the end of that interview, it was just a fluke. I didn't see anything that I felt threatened [by]. I didn't realize that I was threatening [the dog]. It just happened."

The on-camera bite became a viral sensation, circulated all over the world.

"My niece lives in Lithuania, and it was in the newspaper in her small town in Lithuania. Can you believe that?" Dyer asked incredulously.

Dyer has already undergone two surgeries and is having the remaining stitches taken out this week. In the summer, a doctor will decide whether she needs any more surgery.

She has received an outpouring of support from people everywhere, who have left messages on her Facebook page and sent her cards. Dyer has also gotten some negative messages from people blaming her for the dog's temporary detention.

"People get heated and protective over dogs," she said. "I never felt any ill toward Max."

"The dog went and did his time, as the city says, and I'm glad he's back with his family because that must have been a really hard 24 hours for that family to go through that, so I'm glad they've got their dog back," Dyer said. "It was just an accident."

Dyer said the negativity was a "shame" because, for her, the experience had been oddly positive, and she is looking forward to getting back to work.

"I just keep reading the letters and know that I'm going to heal," she said. "I don't know how quickly, but I will and I'll be better than ever."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb142012

News Anchor Bitten by Dog Received 70 Stitches, Mouth Stitched Shut

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- The Colorado news anchor bitten by a rescued dog live on air posted on her Facebook page that she received 70 stitches on her face and is unable to speak because her mouth is stitched shut.

Kyle Dyer, a veteran morning news anchor for NBC News’ Denver affiliate KUSA, was reporting on an uplifting story of a dog rescued from a frozen reservoir when the dog bit her on the lip Feb. 8.

When Dyer bent down to kiss the dog’s nose, the 85-pound Argentine Mastiff named Max turned his head and bit into Dyer’s face, as his owner and rescuer watched in disbelief.

Dyer has received an outpouring of support from thousands of well-wishers on her Facebook page. Over the weekend, she took to the page to update them on her status.

“After a 4 hour surgery, I have 70 stitches in my upper lip, lower lip and nose,” Dyer wrote. “I am unable to talk because my mouth is stitched shut to allow for the skin graft to take and get the blood circulating in my lips again.”

Dyer thanked the medical team at Denver Health Medical center for taking “excellent care” of her. She was released from the hospital on Thursday and is at home recovering.

“I can’t say thank you enough for all of your notes and prayers of encouragement and love,” Dyer wrote. “They give me great strength, which along with my faith, will see me through a successful recovery!”

Dyer is scheduled to return to the doctor this week and to undergo another procedure in the next few weeks and is already looking to the future and her return to TV.

“Once I’m all healed, I will return to my friends at 9NEWS who have been remarkably supportive as have viewers and friends throughout the country,” she wrote.

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Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio