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Entries in Obamacare (4)

Friday
Jun292012

Medical Organizations Applaud Health Care Ruling

Mark Wilson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Thursday that the Affordable Care Act, with its individual mandate, is constitutional has elicited a wide range of opinions from across the medical community.

Most major national medical organizations -- including the American Medical Association, the National Physicians Alliance, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Association of American Medical Colleges -- hail the ruling as a victory.  Many of these organizations have been strong supporters of the ACA since Congress passed it in 2010.

"The American Medical Association has long supported health insurance coverage for all, and we are pleased that this decision means millions of Americans can look forward to the coverage they need to get healthy and stay healthy," said Dr. Jeremy Lazarus, president of the American Medical Association.

"At last, the country is moving in a healthy direction on health care," said Dr. Valier Arkoosh, president of the National Physicians Alliance.

However, a handful of medical organizations are not as enthusiastic.

"We cannot overlook provisions like the Independent Payment Advisory Board that threaten the doctor-patient relationship and the administrative burdens within the law that could greatly hinder providers' ability to deliver quality care by infringing upon exam room time," said Dr. John Tongue, president of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

"We are concerned that there are key aspects to this law that will, ultimately, hurt this nation's ability to provide widespread are for its citizens," the American Urological Association, the American Association of Clinical Urologists, and the Large Urology Group Practice Association said in a joint statement.

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the individual mandate, which states that all Americans must have health insurance or else pay a fine.  The Court stated that the fine is essentially a tax, giving the government the right to impose it.  However, the Court limited the law's ability to expand Medicaid, deciding that the U.S. government cannot withhold a state's Medicaid money if the state doesn't want to participate in the expansion.

The ACA, initially passed through Congress in 2010, could potentially cover more than 30 million people who are currently uninsured in the United States.

The law also has support from a wide range of patient advocacy groups, including the American Cancer Society, the National Organization for Rare Diseases, the American Heart Association, Consumer Reports, and the March of Dimes.

The parts of the law that have already been implemented will not be changed. Thus, children can stay on their parents' health insurance until they turn 26, and patients will not have to provide co-payments for preventive care.  However, the key piece of the law -- the individual mandate -- will not commence until 2014.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug042011

Rick Perry Takes a Shot at Romney over Mass. Health Care 

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Texas Governor Rick Perry took a shot at Mitt Romney for the healthcare plan he implemented as governor of Massachusetts, calling it a “failure” and likening it to Obama’s health care plan.

“If some state decides to do something like pass a health care plan that, you know, is kind of like this Obama thing and it's a failure then we kind of go, 'ooh, we don't want to do that,' and that state may have been harmed by it, but the whole nation was not,” Perry told CBN in an exclusive interview.  

This is the first hit Perry has taken at a presidential candidate since he announced he’s toying with the idea of a run, but this is not the first time Perry has taken a swipe at Romney.  In his most recent book, "Fed Up!," Perry said he supports states’ decisions on healthcare but said Texans would not favor a plan like the one developed by Romney or Obama.

Earlier this week, the Austin-American Statesman reported on a longstanding feud between the two governors.  In his 2008 book, “On My Honor,” Perry expressed anger with Romney for not allowing the Boy Scouts to volunteer at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

"Several years have gone by," Perry, who was an Eagle Scout himself, wrote, "and neither Mitt Romney nor anyone else who served as an official of the 2002 Winter Olympics has given a clear and logical explanation of why the door to volunteerism was shut."

"We know that Romney, as a political candidate in the politically liberal state of Massachusetts, has parted ways with the Scouts on its policies over the involvement of gay individuals in Scout activities."

The Romney camp has remained quiet about a potential bid by the Texas governor as many speculate Perry’s entrance in the race would affect Romney’s front-runner status.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Texas Governor Rick Perry took a shot at Mitt Romney for the healthcare plan he implemented as governor of Massachusetts, calling it a “failure” and likening it to Obama’s health care plan.

 

“If some state decides to do something like pass a health care plan that, you know, is kind of like this Obama thing and it's a failure then we kind of go, 'ooh, we don't want to do that,' and that state may have been harmed by it, but the whole nation was not,” Perry told CBN in an exclusive interview. 

 

This is the first hit Perry has taken at a presidential candidate since he announced he’s toying with the idea of a run, but this is not the first time Perry has taken a swipe at Romney.  In his most recent book, "Fed Up!," Perry said he supports states’ decisions on healthcare but said Texans would not favor a plan like the one developed by Romney or Obama.

 

“On the other side of the coin, Massachusetts is free to experiment with state run healthcare.  If federalism is respected, the people of Massachusetts are free to try it while the rest of the nation sits back and watches to see if they have any success, and whether any success they do have is worth the price of losing liberty.  Now, we in Texas are not too excited about the prospect of government -- run anything, much less health care, and the federal legislation -- known to most as Obamacare -- is a direct result on the principle of federalism."

 

Earlier this week, the Austin-American Statesman reported on a long standing feud between the two governors.  In his 2008 book, “On My Honor,” Perry expressed anger with Romney for not allowing the Boy Scouts to volunteer at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

 

"Several years have gone by," Perry, who was an Eagle Scout himself, wrote, "and neither Mitt Romney nor anyone else who served as an official of the 2002 Winter Olympics has given a clear and logical explanation of why the door to volunteerism was shut."

 

"We know that Romney, as a political candidate in the politically liberal state of Massachusetts, has parted ways with the Scouts on its policies over the involvement of gay individuals in Scout activities."

 

The Romney camp has remained quiet about a potential bid by the Texas governor as many speculate Perry’s entrance in the race would affect Romney’s front-runner status.

 

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar182011

Checking In: What Do Americans Think Of Health Care Reform?

Thomas Northcut/Digital Vision(WASHINGTON) -- According to the results of a new poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, which has been tracking the attitudes of Americans toward the health care reform law, 42 percent of the public said they view it favorably and those who think it will improve their own quality of care, costs or ability to get insurance are at all time lows.

The poll found that 23 percent of Americans say the law will make their health care costs better compared to 42 percent who say costs will grow.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Jan022011

Medical Insurance Changes for 2011

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Under President Obama's Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law on March 23, 2010, insurers must offer parents the option of keeping their adult children covered under their medical plan until age 26. This mandate went into effect for most medical insurance plans whose benefit year begins Jan. 1, 2011.

Most health insurance plans previously dropped children from parental insurance plans once they turned 19 or graduated college. This controversial insurance modification is seen by many Americans as an extension of childhood for adults in their 20s, while for others, the measure is necessary to end the insurance gap that affects many young people.

A 2008 survey conducted by the National Institutes of Health showed that about 30 percent of adults between the ages of 20 and 29 do not have health insurance, a circumstance largely brought on by large numbers of young adults taking nontraditional, temporary or low-paying jobs that do not come with conventional employee benefits such as health insurance. That makes this age group the largest without health insurance.

While coverage for adult children depends entirely on their parents' insurance policy (for example, vision and dental care may not be included as eligible benefits), adult children -- including those married and the financially independent -- can now be included on their parents' plans.

Under the federally mandated new law, all health care plans are required to provide coverage to children under the age of 19, regardless of pre-existing health conditions, but similar coverage may not be extended to those older than 19. Additionally, bringing in an adult child will incur additional costs, the extent of which depends on the insurance provider and the amount of dependents listed on a plan. However, a qualified young adult must be offered coverage at the same cost as any other dependent on a parent's existing plan.

No special action is required by parents or their insurance dependents. Their dependents only need to enroll during the plan's open enrollment period, which, for most plans, ends on the first day of the new benefit year.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







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