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Entries in Ohio (6)

Wednesday
Jan022013

Identical Twins in Ohio Give Birth Two Hours Apart

Courtesy Marcella Farson(AKRON, Ohio) -- Call it a post-Christmas miracle, or an early New Year’s blessing.

Identical twins Aimee and Ashlee Nelson, 19, of Akron, Ohio, gave birth Dec. 31 to sons about two hours apart at Summa Akron City Hospital.

“I’m overwhelmed,” Marcella Farson, the twins’ mother, told ABC News. “It’s wonderful. This is the best New Year’s that anyone could have ever given me. I think I’m still in shock.”

Ashlee’s due date was Jan. 1, Aimee’s Jan. 6.  But the young women ended up having two baby boys on the same day. Donavyn Scott Bratten was born first, with Aimee delivering around noon. Not long after, around 2 p.m., Ashlee gave birth to Aiden Lee Alan Dilts, the larger of the two boys.

“She [Aimee] actually started calling me at 8:30 Sunday evening and said, ‘Mommy, I’m having these feelings, I’ve never had these feelings before.’ And I didn’t hear from her again until 2:30 in the morning. But by 3:30, we were on the way to the hospital. Things moved quite rapidly,” Farson said.

Ashlee was still at home at this point and had no idea her twin sister, who was due after her, was already at the hospital going into labor.

“Then I got a text from Ashlee,” Farson said. “I let her know we were at the hospital with Aimee. Then she calls me back 20 minutes later saying, ‘I’m going to go back to bed,’ and about five minutes later she thought her water broke. I said, ‘Sweetheart, get up and come join us.’ She got there about 6:30, quarter ’til seven. It just progressed from there.”

The nurses were joking with Farson, saying she needed roller skates to bounce back and forth between the sisters’ rooms.

“I am so blessed they both wanted me there. Someone was looking down on me, allowing enough time on the two of them for me to be able to experience it with both of them. It just makes me well up thinking about it,” Farson said.

The dads, Matthew Bratten, 20, and Cody Dilts, 22, are doing well, also.

“The dads are holding up wonderful. I was able to step out and get the boys a good meal,” Farson said. “They’ve not left the hospital. The dads have been right by their side. I know both of them have stepped up to the plate. They’re all doing wonderful and I’m very proud of all of them.”

When asked what the best part of being a grandmother to the new baby boys was, Farson said, “It’s a great addition because I’ve got all girls. They already had presents under the tree and both had stockings. They have their first ‘Hot Wheels’ sets waiting for them.”

The boys and their mothers were released from the hospital Wednesday.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Oct232012

Ohio Student Suspended for Growing Out Hair to Donate

Robin Aufderheide(CANTON, Ohio) -- Zachary Aufderheide has run afoul of his Ohio high school's dress code because of his desire to grow his hair long enough to donate it to Locks of Love, an organization that provides wigs to needy children who've lost their hair because of medical problems.

Zachary, 17, of Canton is about an inch away from the 10 inches of hair he needs to donate to the organization. Faced with an ultimatum, the Canton South High School junior decided to accept an in-school suspension rather than cut his ponytail.

The minimum length of hair needed for a hairpiece is 10 inches, according the Locks of Love website.

Zachary said he is passionate about donating hair to the organization because he was picked on as a child and now wants to help sick children who might have lost their hair avoid the feelings he experienced when he was teased.

"I was picked on so I know where they're coming from, I know how they feel so I sort of sympathize with them because I've been there," he said Monday.

Zachary's mother, Robin, said she understood and respected the school's dress code, but wanted officials to make an exception in her son's case.

She said her son went to a school board meeting in September, explained what he was doing and asked them to consider allowing him to reach his goal.

She said board members came up to him after the meeting and commended his efforts, but said the board had voted to uphold the school's dress code, without giving him an explanation.

The school's principal told her son he had until Monday to get his hair cut, she said.

"And we didn't do it. We didn't do it. I measured it and he's got, oh, less than an inch to grow …," she said.

The school's principal, Todd Osborn, has not replied to requests for comment placed by ABC News as of this writing.

Robin Aufderheide said she was surprised by the board's decision, but her son wasn't.

"I feel pretty disappointed with their decision because, honestly, I really put a lot of heart and soul into my demonstration, like, my presentation of the idea to them, and then when they just all unanimously voted against it … it was just kind of heartbreaking to me," he said.

According to the dress code in the Canton Local School District's student handbook, "Hair for male students shall be neat and clean and shall not be worn covering the eyes, in a ponytail, or extending beyond the bottom of the regular shirt collar."

Zachary isn't sure what will happen after the two-day suspension ends, but says if he cut his hair before reaching his goal, "then, personally, that would be admitting defeat to them. It would be meaning that I would just give up on what I view as important to myself. So this is more or less like a battle of my morals and my values, really."

After he donates his hair, he said, he'll be happy to maintain it at regulation length.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb032012

Woman Saved by Wrong Number 

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(CUYAHOGA FALLS, Ohio) -- Loretta Smith, 70, of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, is back home from the hospital Friday. She was having a stroke last week when she tried to call her son. Instead she got Kenny Crater, 28, a student who lives in Broomfield, Colo., near Denver. It was a mis-dialed call that ended up saving her life.

“If I would have kept laying on that floor, I would have died,” Smith told ABC News.

Last Saturday, Smith was sitting on her bed when the right side of her body went numb. She fell off of her bed and landed on her left arm, the only arm that she could move.

“I was scared to death. A million things go through your mind,” she said.

Thinking that she was on the brink of death, Smith flailed about, trying to free her arm. In the process, Smith knocked into her dresser. Her phone fell out of its holster on the dresser and landed next to her left hand.

Smith tried to dial her son’s number, but dialed one digit incorrectly and instead got Crater on the line in Colorado. Instead of hanging up, he listened to her tell him that she was having a stroke and where she lived. He then called his closest police department, the Broomfield Police Department, who transferred him to Cuyahoga Falls police.

In a recording of his call to Cuyahoga Falls Police, Crater can be heard trying to describe the unusual situation.

Crater: I’m in Broomfield, Colorado right now, somebody [sic] was asking -- they’re having a stroke and they called my phone. … It sounded like an older woman.

Dispatcher: Do you know who it is?

Crater: I have no idea who it is. It’s just a freaky thing that she called me …

He gave them her address and phone number. Dispatchers then called Smith and had her describe the situation. Paramedics arrived at her house within the hour and she was taken to Summa Western Reserve Hospital where she was treated.

Smith said that doctors told her that it was a good thing that she got to the hospital so quickly and a few hours more could have caused irreparable damage.

Crater dismissed Smith’s portrayal of him as a hero.

“All I did was answer a phone and made a phone call. I kind of think it’s silly that the world is that hard up for heroes,” he said. He even thinks that it is Smith who should be described as a hero.

“She was the one who was having a stroke and still gave me all of her information. She was the one who survived the stroke,” he said.

But Smith will always credit Crater and his kindness for saving her.

“He’s like my guardian angel…Kenny Crater, he’s my hero,” Smith said.

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Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov282011

Obese Third Grader Taken from Mom, Placed in Foster Care

Digital Vision/Thinkstock (file photo)(CLEVELAND) -- A Cleveland third grader who weighed more than 200 pounds was taken from his mother after officials reportedly said she did not do enough to help the boy -- who suffered from a weight-related health issue -- lose weight.

“They are trying to make it seem like I am unfit, like I don’t love my child,” the boy’s mother, who was not identified, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer.  “It’s a lifestyle change and they are trying to make it seem like I am not embracing that.  It is very hard, but I am trying.”

Officials first became aware of the boy’s weight after his mother took him to the hospital last year while he was having breathing problems, the newspaper reported.  The child was diagnosed with sleep apnea and began to be monitored by social workers while he was enrolled in a program called “Healthy Kids, Healthy Weight” at the Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital.

The boy lost a few pounds, but recently began to gain some back, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported.  At that point, the Department of Children and Family Services asked a juvenile court for custody of the boy, citing his soaring weight as a form of medical neglect, according to the newspaper.

Taking obese children from their families has become a topic of intense debate over the past year after one high-profile pediatric obesity expert made controversial comments in the Journal of the American Medical Association advocating the practice in acute cases.

“In severe instances of childhood obesity, removal from the home may be justifiable, from a legal standpoint, because of imminent health risks and the parents’ chronic failure to address medical problems,” Dr. David Ludwig co-wrote with Lindsey Murtagh, a lawyer and researcher at Harvard’s School of Public Health.

A trial is set for the boy’s ninth birthday next month to determine whether his mother will regain custody.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Oct272011

Teen Blinded by Stargardt's Disease Chases Dreams -- and Guide Dog

Courtesy Sami Stoner(LEXINGTON, Ohio) -- Ohio teen Sami Stoner loves to run.  But when a rare eye disease swiftly stole her vision, the tree-studded trails of cross country running became too dangerous to tackle.

Stoner has Stargardt's disease -- a hereditary form of macular degeneration that causes irreversible blindness.

At first, it seemed running would be yet another sacrifice for the 16-year-old, who will never be able to drive.  But she found her way back into the race with a one-and-a-half-year-old golden retriever called Chloe.

"When one door closes, another one opens," said Stoner, a high school junior in Lexington, Ohio.  "Even if you have a disability or you don't think you can do something, there's almost always a way."

Stoner met Chloe, a specially trained guide dog, in July at the Pilot Dogs facility in Columbus, Ohio.  Tethered by a sturdy harness, the pair endured four weeks of intense training -- first walking and then running under close supervision.

"I've never bonded with even a person like that," said Stoner.  "She knows she has to watch out for me.  I can't imagine being without her now."

Stoner returned to Lexington with Chloe on Aug. 17.  Although Chloe could safely guide Stoner through three miles of uneven terrain, one obstacle required outside help: Ohio High School Athletic Association rules barred Stoner from participating in cross country runs with a dog.

"There's never been a blind athlete with a dog sanctioned to compete," said John Harris, director of athletics for Lexington Local Schools.

Harris urged the association to allow Stoner and Chloe to run.  Eventually, they said yes -- with some stipulations.  Stoner has to start 20 seconds after the other runners.  And while she's allowed to pass them, and she does, she can't impede them.

With the Association's OK, Stoner and Chloe raced the following day on Sept. 17.  In three meets since, the pair has bettered their time.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Dec142010

Surgeon Makes Fingers for Baby Born Without

Dr. William Seitz of Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Photo Courtesy - ABC News(CLEVELAND) -- When Laura Azzopardi gave birth to her son, Gavin, three years ago, she did what many new parents do, counting his fingers and toes. Gavin had five toes on each foot, but was born with just a pinky and thumb on each hand. It was a congenital hand deformity, a condition with unknown causes.

Laura and her husband, Keith, were uncertain Gavin would ever have functional hands, until they found an article in People magazine. The article, A New Hand for Ryan, introduced the family to the groundbreaking work of Dr. William Seitz, an orthopedic surgeon at Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, who was building fingers for another young boy.

At just nine months of age, Gavin began a series of treatments and surgeries at Cleveland Clinic aimed at building him two hands that would eventually help him in everyday life.

Creating two additional fingers per hand would require transferring bone for what was to be his middle and ring fingers and reshaping it into index and middle fingers. The new bones were attached to metal lengthening devices which helped them grow.

The process has been long and arduous, but Dr. Seitz said he sees results in his work. After two years of treatment, he said, Gavin's new fingers are "tubes of skin and bone. They've got muscle attachments to them and they've got some tendon attachments and they move."

Gavin has responded well to the treatment. "He's pretty darn functional right now. There's not much he can't do," Dr. Seitz said.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







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