SEARCH

Entries in Persistence (2)

Saturday
Jun162012

Study: Authoritative Parenting by Dads Teaches Perseverance in Kids

Jupiterimages/Polka Dot(NEW YORK) -- A new study says that children learn persistence from their fathers, and the acquired skill can lead to a reduced risk of criminal behavior and better performance at school, Health Day reports.

For the study, researchers from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah followed adolescents aged 11 to 14 from 325 two-parent families for several years. Researchers found that children of the fathers who exhibited authoritative parenting--about 52 percent--were much more likely to develop persistence, which resulted in lower levels of delinquency and better outcomes at school.

The researchers emphasized that authoritative parenting is not the same as authoritarian parenting, and involves three basic features: children feel warmth and love from their father, children are granted appropriate levels of autonomy and fathers stress accountability and the justification of rules.

Researchers also suggested that single parents can still teach their children about persistence, even though the study only included two-parent families, according to Health Day.

The findings were published June 15 in the Journal of Early Adolescence.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun152012

Persistence Is Learned from Fathers, Says Study

Ron Nickel/Design Pics/Valueline/Thinkstock(PROVO, Utah) -- Are you tenacious on the job front?  Tireless on the playing field?  Do you keep chipping away at a pursuit you believe in, even when everyone else seems to say "no"?

You may have your dear old dad to thank for that eternal persistence.

A new study published in the Journal of Early Adolescence found that dads are in a unique position to instill persistence and hope in their children, particularly in the pre-teen and teen years.

Researchers from Brigham Young University analyzed 325 families over a four-year period, when fathers responded to questionnaires regarding their parenting style, and children ages 11 to 14 responded to questions about school performance and attaining goals.  Fathers who practiced authoritative parenting, defined as providing feelings of love, granting autonomy and emphasizing accountability to a child, were more likely to have kids who developed the art of persistence, which led to better outcomes in school and lower instances of misbehavior.

Dads who ruled with an iron fist and an authoritarian style (harsher and more punishment-based parenting) had less persistent children.

"Fathers have a direct impact on how children perceive persistence and hope, and how they implement that into their lives," said Randall Day, professor in the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University and co-author of the study.  "It's important to say that moms can do this, too, but it turns out that when fathers use authoritative parenting, they have an impact on how their adolescents perceive themselves and how persistent they are in their lives."

Day calls these types of dads "heart beat fathers" because of their consistent presence in the ordinary day-to-day interactions with their kids.

Researchers said the study joins a growing body of research that suggests fathers are uniquely important to children's self-regulation and self-esteem.  While that is not to say mothers do not instill these values, men and fathers may take on this role more often because of societal acceptance and expectations.

"Our study suggests fathers who are most effective are those who listen to their children, have a close relationship, set appropriate rules, but also grant appropriate freedoms," said Laura Padilla-Walker, co-author of the study and associate professor in the School of Family Life at BYU.

"Persistence is an important character trait to teach to our children and is meaningfully related to teen outcomes over time," Padilla-Walker continued.  "We focus so often on things like genetic intelligence that I think it's refreshing to be reminded that good old-fashioned 'sticking with it' is really important, too."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio