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Entries in Physician-Assisted Suicide (2)

Friday
Jul132012

Physician-Assisted Dying: Experts Debate Doctor's Role

Pixland/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Peggy Sutherland was ready to die.  The morphine oozing from a pump in her spine was no match for the pain of lung cancer, which had evaded treatment and invaded her ribs.

"She needed so much morphine it would have rendered her basically unconscious," said Sutherland's daughter, Julie McMurchie, who lives in Portland, Ore.  "She was just kind of done."

Sutherland, 68, decided to use Oregon's "Death With Dignity Act," which allows terminally-ill residents to end their lives after a 15-day requisite waiting period by self-administering a lethal prescription drug.

"Her doctor wrote the prescription and met my husband and me at the pharmacy on the 15th day," said McMurchie, recalling how her mother "didn't want to wait."  "Then he came back to the house, and he stayed with us until her heart stopped beating."

But not all doctors are on board with the law.  In the 15 years since Oregon legalized physician-assisted dying, only Washington and Montana have followed suit, a resistance some experts blame on the medical community.

"I think it has to do with the role of physicians in the process," said Dr. Lisa Lehmann, director of the Center for Bioethics at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.  "Prescribing a lethal medication with the explicit intent of ending life is really at odds with the role of a physician as a healer."

More than two-thirds of American doctors object to physician-assisted suicide, according to a 2008 study published in the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care.  And in an editorial published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lehmann argues that removing doctors from assisted dying could make it more available to patients.

"I believe patients should have control over the timing of death if they desire.  And I suggest rethinking the role of physicians in the process so we can respect patient choices without doing something at odds with the integrity of physicians," she said.

Instead of prescribing the life-ending medication, physicians should only be responsible for diagnosing patients as terminally ill, Lehmann said.  Terminally ill patients should then be able to pick up the medication from a state-approved center, similar to medical marijuana dispensaries.

But assisted dying advocates say doctors should be involved in the dying.

"Patients deserve to have their physician accompany them there and not walk away," said Barbara Coombs Lee, president of the Denver nonprofit Compassion and Choices.

Coombs Lee, a nurse-turned-lawyer and chief petitioner for the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, said decisions about death should be no different than other treatment decisions.

"Physicians don't walk away from patients who make other intentional decisions to advance death, such as refusing a ventilator or a pacemaker," she said.  "Why walk away from a terminally ill patient requesting life-ending medication?"

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Oct182011

Retired Doctor to Test Physician-Assisted Death Law in Hawaii

Courtesy Robert Orfali(HONOLULU) -- Jeri Orfali was a top software executive in the early days of Silicon Valley, author of several books and was even professionally courted by Steve Jobs until, like Jobs, she was struck down with cancer at the age of 56.

"You don't think about how someone dies from cancer," said her husband of 30 years, Robert Orfali.  "No one tells you what really happens.  It took me by surprise, everything."

The Orfalis settled in Hawaii, where his wife was eventually diagnosed with ovarian cancer and died in 2009.  In her final days, she bore excruciating pain that was not helped by palliative care.

"In the end I could see tumors coming out of her legs and in her neck," he said.  "Her legs were swollen and her stomach was so bloated, the cancer almost burst out of her.  She couldn't get her next breath."

There is no dignity in dying, according to Orfali, who was so horrified by his wife's suffering that he wrote two books on the topic and has pushed to see Hawaii be the fourth state to legalize physician-assisted suicide.

And now, experts working with the national group, Compassion and Choices, and the Hawai'i Death With Dignity Society, have unearthed a 102-year-old provision in Hawaiian law that they say means aid in dying has been legal all along:

"[W]hen a duly licensed physician or osteopathic physician pronounces a person affected with any disease hopeless and beyond recovery and gives a written certificate to that effect to the person affected or the person's attendant, nothing herein shall forbid any person from giving or furnishing any remedial agent or measure when so requested by or on behalf of the affected person."

Advocates say the provision was added in 1909 to give dying patients the option to get treatment that may not have been approved by the government.  It likely arose out of now-canonized Father Damien's missionary work on the Island of Molokai with those who suffered from leprosy.

Some retired doctors now say they are poised to go ahead and help those who seek aid in dying, provided they meet guidelines established by a law in Oregon, where doctors have been legally allowed to end a terminal patient's suffering since 1997.

Since then, Washington and Montana have also legalized aid in dying.

"I think there is very little risk on my part if I did that," said Dr. Robert "Nate" Nathanson, 77, a retired general practitioner from Oahu, who said he has kept his medical license current so he could test the existing law. "If you qualify and your own doctor won't do it, I would be willing."

Nathanson and Orfali were part of a recent forum on that legal provision and have been advocates for what they call "death with dignity."  Advocates say that just having the lethal pills gives terminally ill patients peace of mind that they can control their lives and their death.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio