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Entries in Players (2)

Tuesday
Oct042011

Study Says Foot 'Bawlers' Are Happier, Have Higher Self-Esteem

Hemera Technologies/Thinkstock(BLOOMINGTON, Ind.) -- There might not be crying in baseball but there is in college football and psychologists say that's a good thing.

According to a new study released Monday, researchers found that players who tear up after losing a game tend to have higher self-esteem than those who "man-up" and don't show their true emotions.

Researchers at Indiana University-Bloomington also say that college athletes who display physical affection toward other players seem to be happier in whatever they do.

Study researcher Jesse Steinfeldt remarked that players who "are emotionally expressive are more likely to have a mental edge on and off the field."

They mentioned how the media was wrong to have singled out former University of Florida quarterback Tim Tebow for crying after his team lost a big game in 2009, even labeling him Tim "Tearbow."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
May042011

Joe Montana Suffers Joint Pain After All-Star NFL Career

BananaStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- At the peak of his career, Joe Montana was one of football's biggest names, with four Super Bowl rings to his name. But now in his retirement, "Joe Cool" is the face of a nutritional supplement that he says helps his aching joints -- the price he has paid for 20 years of tackles.

"The joint pain started at some point a little bit into my career," said Montana. "When you have 300-pound fellows falling on you for that many years, you start to feel it."

Chronic joint pain plagues many of the NFL's finest, and many players say it just comes with the territory.

"For me, it was a stiffness that wouldn't go away," said Montana. "One knee was worse than the other, and then there was the swelling that goes along with it. The more you can keep your joints lubricated, the less you'll feel that."

Pain and stiffness are caused by injury to the articular cartilage, or the smooth white covering over the bones at the joints. Small injuries can become larger over time, and eventually the underlying bone is exposed. Even if the injuries have time to heal fully, different scar tissues can cause different kinds of stiffness.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 50 million Americans have some form of chronic joint pain or arthritis. Along with the pain can come a variety of other symptoms, as well.

"We conducted a study a few years ago that identified a substantial minority of retired NFL players who suffered high levels of chronic disease, including osteoarthritis and joint pain," said Dr. Thomas Schwenk, professor of family medicine at University of Michigan. "The pain was associated with significant levels of depression and low levels of daily function, causing significant distress and misery."

"Once their careers are over, a lot of the residual damage causes high level of arthritis and pain, and leads to depression, loss of physical activity and physical self-esteem," said Schwenk. "They often gain weight, especially the lineman, leading to diabetes, hypertension and heart disease."

With so many people playing through injury, a bias has been created for players to get in the game, even when injured, in order to keep their careers going, said Schwenk.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio