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Entries in Tips (17)

Saturday
Feb092013

Dr. Ruth's Seven Tips for Spicing Up Your Love Life

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a renowned psychosexual therapist whose straightforward approach to sex and relationship advice made her an American icon for decades.

Dr. Ruth first made a name for herself in the 80s with her radio program, Sexually Speaking, in which she would speak frankly about all matters concerning the bedroom. Since then, she has appeared in every form of media: hosting her own national TV talk shows, having a regular Ask Dr. Ruth column, producing five documentaries, writing 36 books, including Sex For Dummies, and even on Twitter.

Just in time for Valentine's Day, Dr. Ruth offers her tips for spicing up your love life.

1. Bring Flowers

"Bringing flowers is good. Sending flowers ahead of time is better. A woman needs more time to become aroused so looking at those flowers all day will help put her in the mood."

2. The Best Gift of All? A Massage

"What's the best gift you can give your partner? A massage. It feels good, your touch will warm his or her body and soul, and best of all, it doesn't cost a cent."

3. Make Your Own Love Nest

"Instead of going out, order in and decorate with candles. Make your own love nest. Plus, you'll be closer to the bedroom."

4. Whisper Sweet Nothings

"Some men know they're supposed to be romantic but they are not sure what that means. The best way to set a romantic mood is to whisper sweet nothings in your partner's ears. If you make her feel treasured and special the two of you will be drenched in romance."

5. Have a Positive Outlook

"The key to good sex is to have a positive outlook. If you assume you'll be having good sex you will. If you assume you won't, you won't."

6. Play It Safe

"How important is birth control? If you're worried about causing an unintended pregnancy, you'll enjoy Valentine's day more if you play it safe. Don't think of contraceptives as a damper, instead think of them as an enhancement."

7. Do Something Active

"Most people think of going out to dinner as what you do on Valentine's Day but there are alternatives. Anything that gets your circulation going will make you both feel sexier. If there's someplace nearby where you can ice skate that would be perfect. Or go for a run, then share a nice warm bath. Get your circulation moving and I guarantee you that you'll have a great time."

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec272012

Ten Healthy Tips to Start Off the New Year

Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- This is the time of year when many of us resolve to lose weight and exercise more.

Here are simple, painless steps you can take to get started on this path to lifelong success:

  1. Give your refrigerator and pantry an overhaul. Stock up on healthy foods.
  2. Leave the junk foods at the grocery store where they are not in easy reach and never go grocery shopping hungry.
  3. Learn how to read labels. An educated consumer is a healthy consumer.
  4. Deprivation leads to overindulgence. Treat yourself to small portions of the higher-calorie foods on occasion.
  5. Learn how to cook with less fat, salt and sugar. Healthy food can be both nutritious and delicious.
  6. If you have a setback, keep moving on. Lifestyle changes do not happen overnight.
  7. Watch your portions. Calories are still at the core of weight loss and weight gain.
  8. Exercise at least 30 minutes (cardiovascular and resistance training) most days of the week.
  9. Keep yourself hydrated. Chose water and seltzer over other beverages.
  10. Accept the fact that there are no quick fixes. Visualize success and take it one day at a time.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Aug062012

6 Tips and Myths About Lightning

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As the summer's crazy weather brought another weekend of deadly lightning strikes, this time at a Pennsylvania auto racing event, Americans are reminded of the myths surrounding the dramatic and dangerous spectacle of Mother Nature as well as tips to keep safe.

Severe weather left one NASCAR fan dead and nine injured this weekend after lightning struck behind the stands at Pennsylvania's 400 Sprint Cup Race at the Pocono Raceway near Scranton.

"When things started to clear up all we saw was a camping tent destroyed and two bodies on the ground," racing fan Kyle Manger told ABC News.

A severe storm warning had been issued about 45 minutes before the strike, and fans had been advised over the public address system and through social media to take cover.

Here are three tips -- and three myths -- about lightning, should you encounter a severe weather situation, with or without similar warnings.

Tips

1. Seek shelter in a large enclosed building. Lightning will travel through the wiring or plumbing of the building -- into the ground and away from you.
"Half the people that die from lightning strikes in the U.S. this year were standing under trees and the other half were out in open fields," chief meteorologist for KTRK, Tim Heller, told ABC News.

2. Do not use a corded telephone or anything plugged into the wall. Lightning can travel through wiring and plumbing -- so even if you're indoors, you must still be cautious.

3. Stay away from sinks, tubs and showers. And if going inside isn't an option, seek shelter in a car with a hard top. That way, even if the car is struck by lightning, it will travel through the metal of the car and down into the ground, away from you.

Myths

1. Lightning never strikes the same place twice. False! Take the Empire State Building for example -- it gets struck around 25 times each year.

2. If it isn't raining, you don't have to worry about lightning. That's not true either. Lightning can travel up to 25 miles from a storm. So even if the storm seems far away, lightning may still be a threat.

3. You're safer if you lay flat or get close to the ground. People used to think that getting low to the ground meant you were less likely to be struck by lightning. But that's not true either. It doesn't matter how tall you are, if you're not indoors, you're at risk.

So bottom line, go inside if you see lightning -- no matter how close you may think it is.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Dec252011

Holiday Travel Tips: Get Your Flu Shot

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Millions of people will hit the roads, rail and sky over the remainder of the holiday season, and tagging along with them will be hordes of germs ready to spread to the traveling masses.

Despite being surrounded by bacteria and viruses in stores, airports and other public places, there are a few simple ways to minimize the risk of catching a disease, such as the cold and the flu, which could zap the happy out of the holidays.

"You don't want to be a hermit, and you want to enjoy the holidays, but try to use some common sense principles to avoid getting sick," said Dr. Lisa Bernstein, associate professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

"Even though it's December, it's not too late to get a flu shot. Flu season goes through early spring," said Bernstein.

"This is the prime time for influenza," said Dr. Laurence Gardner, professor of medicine and executive dean for clinical affairs at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "When people are in enclosed spaces in cold environments, the passage of viruses -- especially the flu virus -- is much greater than in wide open spaces in the summer."

Dr. Michael Perskin, assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, suggests getting vaccinated against other disease, such as whooping cough, or pertussis.

Although it may seem inconvenient to worry about flu shots on top of everything else, the alternative could be a lot worse.

"It would be an enormous waste of time if, because of not getting vaccinated, someone spent five days in bed with a fever and just felt crummy," Gardner said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec212011

Holiday Travel Tip: Eat Right and Exercise

George Doyle/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Millions of people will hit the roads, rail and sky over the remainder of the holiday season, and tagging along with them will be hordes of germs ready to spread to the traveling masses.

Despite being surrounded by bacteria and viruses in stores, airports and other public places, there are a few simple ways to minimize the risk of catching a disease, such as the cold and the flu, which could zap the happy out of the holidays.

"You don't want to be a hermit, and you want to enjoy the holidays, but try to use some common-sense principles to avoid getting sick," said Dr. Lisa Bernstein, associate professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

Along with washing your hands, remaining especially vigilant and getting your flu shot ahead of time, remember that proper nutrition and physical activity are especially important during the holidays. People may neglect these needs because of bad weather or other obligations, but they are vital to staying healthy.

"Eat a healthy diet and exercise -- those are the best preventive activities along with not smoking," said Dr. Michael Perskin, assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center. "Your immune system will be healthier and that will help fight off infection."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec212011

Holiday Travel Tip: Be Vigilant On Planes

John Foxx/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Airplanes are notoriously germy places. Studies have shown that airplane bathrooms harbor a number of different types of bacteria and viruses, and the recirculated air in planes can also contain many infectious agents. Germs also lurk on tray tables and on seats and seat backs.

"If you're in a plane, wipe down seats, seat backs and tray tables," said Dr. Lisa Bernstein, associate professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Travelers should also, as always, wash their hands whenever possible.

A 2009 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that passengers on two lengthy flights into Australia were at increased risk for getting a flu-like illness after the flight if they sat up to two rows away from a person who had flu symptoms before the flight. They were at even higher risk if a symptomatic passenger sat within two seats in front, behind or to the side.

While it may be difficult to control who sits in nearby seats or rows, if a person is sneezing or coughing, try to stay away from that person and disinfect surfaces and hands regularly.

"Also, don't touch your eyes, mouth or nose, since there are only so many times you may be able to wash your hands," said Dr. Michael Perskin, assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Spreading germs is a two-way street, so people who may be coughing or sneezing should be careful to avoid coughing or sneezing into other people's faces and should use tissues or hold their mouths when possible. They should also, of course, wash their hands.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec082011

Anthony Bourdain's Tips for Surviving Holiday Travel

Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Whether you’re traveling by plane, train or automobile this holiday season, you’ll likely encounter a delay, hassle or unforeseen adventure at some point in your journey.   

If anyone knows how to survive a travel adventure it is Anthony Bourdain, the chef, author and Travel Channel host who has traveled the globe and visited some of the world’s most exotic locations for his Emmy-award winning series No Reservations.

In his new series, The Layover, Bourdain gives viewers his best tips on how to survive their own travel nightmares, and make the most of whatever trip they’re on.

Bourdain stopped by ABC’s Good Morning America to give viewers these top five tips to make their holiday travel less hassle, and more fun!

Eat like a local.  Wherever you are, eat what the locals are good at or famous for, and eat where those locals like to eat it. Do not rely on your concierge for dining tips. He’s in the business of making tourists happy. You want the places that make locals happy. Seek out places crowded with locals. Avoid places where others of your kind are present.

Show appreciation. People everywhere like it when you are appreciative of their food. I cannot stress enough how important your initial reactions to offerings of local specialties are to any possible relationships you might make abroad. Smile and try to look happy, even if you don’t like it. If you do like it, let them know through word or gesture of appreciation.

Visit local markets. Get up early and check out the central food market. It’s a fast way into a culture, where you’ll see the basics of the cuisine. You’ll often find local prepared foods at stands or stalls serving markets’ workers.

Travel prepared.  Be prepared to be stuck in an airport for indeterminate periods of time. Load your mobile device with as many games, songs, apps, and e-books as possible to keep busy during long waits. Also, make sure to pack a battery charger to power up.

Get comfortable.
  Remember to bring something scrunchy and long-sleeved, like a sweatshirt. You might need it as a pillow.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Nov022011

Tips to Get You Eating Better and Working Out

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Mary Claire Orenic, USA Today’s “happiest woman in America,” says her diet and exercise regimen have contributed to her high well-being. She eats five small meals a day in addition to a big breakfast, plays volleyball with her son and basketball with her husband and enjoys lots of walking with a neighbor.

“I continually eat throughout the day to keep my energy up,” she told ABC News. “I like doing sports....We love going skiing. We love going hiking. We love going down to the beach.”

Check out the following five tips to give your health a kick in the right direction.

  1. Add 2 or 3 healthy snacks to your shopping list.
  2. Ask a friend to go for a walk this week.
  3. Climb a set of stairs (at least 20 steps) today.
  4. Design a tossed salad.
  5. List a healthy activity you can do to help you manage stress.


Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Oct072011

Expert Tips for Tackling Your Pain Problems

Creatas Images/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- ABC News’ senior health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser – a former director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – offers these tips for tackling your problems with pain:

  • If you are currently managing your pain by yourself, you need to get help from an expert. There are pain specialists to help you understand your pain triggers and find the best medications. You should look for the most relief with the fewest side effects and should always work with your doctor. Don't add medications on your own. That is when you can really get into trouble.
  • Make sure you have a doctor who you feel believes you. Nothing is worse than being in pain and feeling like your doctor doesn't understand your problem. If you are in that situation, it is time to get a new doctor. There is no quick fix for most conditions that cause chronic pain. You have to believe that your doctor is on your side.
  • Educate yourself. There are a number of drug and non-drug therapies (physical therapy, yoga, meditation, massage) that can help control pain. Be open to trying new approaches. Dealing with the stress that comes with having a chronic pain condition can actually help reduce the pain itself.


For even more pain tips, click here to visit the American Pain Foundation's website.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio´╗┐

Wednesday
Aug242011

How to Stay Safe during a Major Earthquake

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- You're sitting at your desk, or in your kitchen, and all of a sudden the building begins to wobble.

To some people, the 5.8-magnitude earthquake in central Virginia Tuesday felt like a gentle rolling.  To others, closer to the epicenter, it was more violent.

And then it was over.  People from New England to the Carolinas to Canada were left asking, "What was that?"

If you live in California or southern Alaska, you probably know what to do in an earthquake.  But Easterners don't often feel tremors, and may not know how to react in a major emergency.  So how can you stay safe?

Here are some pointers from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) if you are caught in a major earthquake:

If You're Indoors:

-- Drop to the ground and take cover.  Get under a sturdy table or other piece of furniture, and hold on   until the shaking stops.
-- If you can't get under something, cover your face and head with your hands and crouch in an inside corner.
-- If you're in bed, stay there.  Cover your head with a pillow.
-- Doorways are not great places for shelter, even though emergency managers used to recommend them.
-- Stay put until the shaking stops.  FEMA says most injuries occur when people try to move to another place.
-- Don't use elevators if you've been in a major quake.  And don't be surprised if power goes out or sprinklers are activated.

If You're Outdoors:

-- Stay there.  Stay away from buildings, power lines, streetlights and other things that could fall on you.
-- People are rarely injured by the actual shaking of an earthquake.  Instead, falling debris is the greater danger.
-- If you're in a car, try to ease to a stop, preferably in an open area away from buildings, trees or overpasses.

Most people who felt Tuesday's earthquake did not need such advice as the quake was not violent enough.  But brick and masonry buildings did sustain damage -- more than one would see in California with its stricter building codes. And the quake was a reminder than even in the East, even between fault lines, there can be risks.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio