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Entries in Tobacco Products (2)

Saturday
Mar312012

FDA Will Require Tobacco Companies to List Harmful Ingredients 

David De Lossy/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The Food and Drug Administration announced on Friday that it will require the tobacco industry to disclose a number of harmful chemical ingredients and also to back up claims for tobacco products marketed as "less risky" to health, Health Day reports.

There are more than 7,000 chemicals in tobacco and tobacco smoke and the FDA has a list of 93 chemicals that cause or may cause harm to smokers or non-smokers, including formaldehyde, nicotine, arsenic, cadmium, ammonia and carbon monoxide. Under the new requirement, tobacco companies will have to list quantities of 20 ingredients linked with cancer, lung disease and other diseases by April 2013.

Tobacco companies will also be required to back up claims that tobacco products marketed as "less risky," such as roll-your-own and smokeless tobacco products, are safer.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Apr252011

US Appellate Court Decides: FDA to Regulate E-Cigarettes as Tobacco Products

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday that it would go along with a federal appellate court decision to regulate electronic cigarettes as tobacco products.

The FDA had wished to regulate the instruments as drug devices the same way nicotine gum and smoking cessation products are regulated.  The FDA maintains that e-cigarettes are not safer than smoking cigarettes, as their makers and distributors often promote.

But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit decided in January that the battery-powered nicotine-delivery devices should be regulated as tobacco products instead. 

Drug device regulations would have required the product to go through pre-market approval. 

Tobacco product regulation prohibits e-cigarettes from being marketed with other FDA-regulated products like food, cosmetics, medical devices or dietary supplements.

Often marketed as a smoking alternative to aid quitting, the FDA argued that e-cigarettes could be regulated as a medical device. But the court rejected this claim, saying that e-cigarettes are not marketed as smoking cessation devices, and therefore could not be considered medical devices.

E-cigarettes will now be subject to ingredient listing, user fees and registration requirements, in addition to several others.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio