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Entries in Tuna (2)

Friday
Mar082013

Bumble Bee, Chicken of the Sea Expand Tuna Recall

Bumble Bee Foods(WASHINGTON) -- Tuna giants Bumble Bee Foods and Chicken of the Sea have expanded recalls of their flaky fish because of a possible packaging problem.

Both companies issued voluntary recalls of some 5-ounce cans of Chunk White Albacore and Chunk Light Tuna Wednesday because the seals did not meet company standards, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The recalls have now been expanded to include more cans.

“There have been no consumer reports of illnesses attributed to these products,” Steve Mavity, Bumble Bee’s senior vice president of technical services and corporate quality assurance, said in a statement. “But because we’ve identified an issue with seal tightness, we’re voluntarily recalling products to ensure the highest margin of safety and quality.”

Loose seals and seams can lead to bacterial contamination, which can cause food poisoning, according to the FDA.

“The health and safety of our consumers is paramount,” Shue Wing Chan, president of Chicken of the Sea’s maker Tri-Union Seafoods, said in a statement. “As soon as we discovered the issue, we took immediate steps to issue this voluntary recall by alerting our customers who received the product and by asking them to remove it from store shelves.”

The recalled cans were distributed to stores nationwide between Jan. 17 and March 6, according to the FDA. The original recalls covered cans distributed between Jan. 17 and Feb. 27. Consumers who purchased the recalled products are advised to dispose of them immediately.

“We must assure our consumers and retailers of a safe and quality product, so we very much appreciate everyone’s part in disposing of the products with the specific codes indicated,” Mavity said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May292012

Fukushima Radiation in Your Sushi?

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Those looking for evidence of the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan may need search no further than their next plate of sushi, Stanford University researchers report.

The researchers tested 15 Pacific bluefin tuna that had migrated from Japan to the California coast and found that the levels of radioactive cesium in these fish were 10 times higher than those found in bluefin tuna from the years before the disaster.

Before you swear off your maguro nigiri, it’s important to realize that the levels of radiation the researchers found from the cesium in the tuna were exceedingly low — about 30 times less than the amount of radiation given off by other common, naturally occurring elements in the tuna we eat.

The findings appeared Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“The finding should be reassuring to the public,” said Timothy J. Jorgensen, associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University, who was not involved with the study. “As anticipated, the tuna contained only trace levels of radioactivity that originated from Japan. These levels amounted to only a small fraction of the naturally occurring radioactivity in the tuna, and were much too small to have any impact on public health."

“Thus, there is no human health threat posed by consuming migratory tuna caught off the west coast of the United States,” he added.

Still, the fact that the researchers could trace this radioactive material back to its source in Japan could have implications for seafood monitoring methods in the future. Dr. Michael Harbut, director of the Environmental Cancer Program at Wayne State University’s Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, agreed that the findings are no cause for panic. But he said that the finding that tuna and migratory food animals could carry this radioactive material so far across the ocean deserves consideration.

“In general, when you hear the word ‘radiation’ at all, it’s cause for some alarm, and I agree always a cause for significant attention.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio