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Entries in UK (4)

Wednesday
Feb012012

British Ban Airbrushed Rachel Weisz Skincare Ad

Michael Tran/FilmMagic(LONDON) -- British regulators have banned a L’Oreal Revitalift skincare ad featuring an airbrushed close-up of Oscar-winning actress Rachel Weisz for exaggerating the product’s age-fighting effects on a woman’s complexion.

The Advertising Standards Authority ruled Wednesday that a two-page ad for L’Oreal Revitalift Repair 10, which ran in September 2011, cannot reappear “in its current form” because the black-and-white image of Weisz misrepresented what the product could do for a woman’s skin. The English beauty, variously reported to be 40 or 41, took home an Academy Award for her role in the 2005 film The Constant Gardener.

In a ruling against the world’s largest cosmetics company, the agency said it took into consideration “that consumers were likely to expect a degree of glamour in images for beauty products” and that advertisers would be “keen to present their products in their most positive light using techniques such as post-production enhancement and the re-touching of images.”

The agency called that approach “acceptable so long as the resulting effect was not one which misleadingly exaggerated the effect that the product was capable of achieving.”

“Although we considered that the image in the ad did not misrepresent the luminosity or wrinkling of Rachel Weisz’s face, we considered that the image had been altered in a way that substantially changed her complexion to make it appear smoother and more even,” the authority wrote.

The ruling came in response to a complaint filed by Jo Swinson, a Scottish member of Parliament and co-founder of the Campaign for Body Confidence. Swinson, a former marketing manager, chairs a Parliamentary inquiry into causes and consequences of body image anxiety. She has succeeded with other complaints about misleading ads for cosmetics brands owned by L’Oreal. Last July, the ASA banned ads for Lancome’s Teint Miracle foundation featuring actress Julia Roberts and for Maybelline’s The Eraser foundation featuring supermodel Christy Turlington.

L’Oreal stands by the effectiveness of its product. It issued the following statement, as reported by MSNBC: “We believe that the image in the advertisement is a true representation of Rachel Weisz. The product claims are based on extensive scientific research which proved that the product improves 10 different signs of skin aging. We therefore do not believe that the ad exaggerates the effect that can be achieved using this product.”

In another ruling Wednesday, the ASA rejected complaints that a L’Oreal moisturizer ad featuring film legend Jane Fonda had been “significantly modified.” Fonda, 74, who has appeared in an ad for L’Oreal Paris Age Re-Perfect Pro Calcium, in 2010 admitted undergoing “work” on her eyes, chin and neck, and reportedly had undergone an earlier facelift. She made a dazzling appearance as a presenter at this year’s Golden Globes awards, drawing wows from actor-director George Clooney, who said: “My God, she looked great, didn’t she?”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan062012

‘Human Barbie’ Gives 7-Year-Old Daughter Liposuction Voucher

Keith Brofsky/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- The U.K.’s self-proclaimed “Human Barbie” gave her 7-year-old daughter an unusual stocking stuffer this Christmas: a £7,000 voucher for liposuction.

The holiday gift was a follow-up to Poppy’s most recent birthday present from her mum: A £6,000 voucher for breast augmentation.

‘She asks for surgery all the time. She wants to look good and lipo is one of those procedures that will always come in handy,” 51-year-old Sarah Burge told the U.K.’s Daily Mail. “I see these vouchers as investing in her future, like saving money for her education.”

Last year Burge, who says she taught her daughter how to pole dance when the girl was 6, defended giving her daughter a breast augmentation voucher when she told Closer Magazine, “Poppy begged me for a boob job, so I gave her the voucher so she can have it after she’s 16, when it’s legal.  If she develops naturally big boobs, she can have something else done with it.”

The mother says that her other daughters, ages 27 and 17, have already had work done. As for Burge, the Daily Mail reported that she rang in her 51st birthday with £51,000 of cosmetic surgery.

Burge has reportedly spent close to $ 1 million on her own plastic surgery endeavors.  She works as an event planner for plastic surgery and swinging parties, and dabbles as a scribe of erotic novels.

“Some people think it’s controversial and I get angry when strangers say I’m a bad mother because I don’t think there’s any harm in giving her this gift,” Burge told the mag. “Poppy is a normal kid who is good at sports and loves playing outside. Girls don’t want Snow White and Cinderella any more."

“They want to be WAGs [a British term to describe wives and girlfriends of high-profile soccer stars], and famous like Cheryl Cole and Lady Gaga,” Burge said.  “I’m just supporting her and making her dreams come true.  Looks are a big part of how our futures pan out -- there shouldn’t be a stigma around wanting to look good.”

As for Poppy, she said of her voucher, “I can’t wait to be like Mummy with big boobs.  They’re pretty.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Apr082011

UK Teen Tanning Bed Ban: Coming to America?

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The bronzed cast of MTV's The Jersey Shore might not be amused. England and Wales have banned the use of tanning booths for those under 18 years of age, enforcing it with a fine up to $32,000.

This follows studies that have discovered that the rate of malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, has tripled in the UK for those under the age of 35 since the seventies. On this side of the Atlantic, more than 30 states have laws restricting minors' access to indoor tanning beds. Still, on an average day, more than one million Americans use tanning salons.

A study published in March in the American Journal of Public Health surveyed 6,000 teenagers ages 14 to 17 over a one-year period about their tanning habits. Researchers found that 17.1 percent of girls and 3.2 percent of boys used indoor tanning within that year. The study also showed that the same number of teens went tanning in states with laws that have age restrictions or require parental consent. Older teenage girls hit the tanning booths the most often.

In the summer of 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organization (WHO), placed tanning beds in its Class 1 carcinogen category, the same classification given to cigarettes, plutonium and ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Frequent tanners using new high-pressure sunlamps in the United States may receive as much as 12 times the annual UVA dose compared with the dose they receive from sun exposure.

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, over the past 31 years, more people have contracted skin cancer than all other cancers combined.

A ban might help parents who are trying to keep their kids off the tanning beds. Penny Casassa of New Jersey told ABC News, "Yes [they should enforce a ban here], then my daughter would not use those stupid tanning beds!"

Some in the U.K. aren't keen about their tanning law.

"I personally think it would be better to educate people at schools instead of enforcing a ban," London resident Hattie Murray told us. "People will always use fake IDs, etc. to get around laws."

Others agree with the new law. Noemie Deed, another England resident, told ABC News, "I think it's a good idea. Although it may not stop teenagers from using sunbeds, it is a good step in encouraging the options of spray tans/tanning lotions etc. I do agree, however, that teenagers need to be better educated on the dangers of sunbeds."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio 

Wednesday
Mar092011

Researchers: Americans Are Sicker Than People in the UK

Comstock/Thinkstock(PRINCETON, N.J.) -- A Princeton University study finds that despite spending more on healthcare in the United States compared to England, Americans experience higher rates of chronic disease across all age groups.

The study compared health indicators in the U.S. and England from childhood through old age for conditions such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and cholesterol levels. Americans had higher rates for most chronic diseases.

The authors conclude that Americans are at a health disadvantage compared to the English. One reason for this difference may be that the health care system in United Kingdom is targeted towards preventive health care compared to American health care.

But critics of the study found some problems. They say that the researchers did not compare the same years, and the samples sizes were different.

The study is published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio