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Entries in Ulcers (2)

Wednesday
Mar142012

Diabetes Linked to Ulcer-Causing Bacteria, Research Suggests

Jeffrey Hamilton/Lifesize/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The same bacterium responsible for most stomach ulcers may play a role in the development of Type 2 diabetes among overweight and obese adults, New York University researchers report Wednesday.

And in the same way that antibiotics eradicate the bacterium and heal ulcers, antibiotics might eventually prove useful in diabetes prevention, they suggest in an article appearing in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Non-diabetic adults infected with Helicobacter pylori, whether or not they had ulcer symptoms, tended to have higher blood sugar than adults without H. pylori, according to the study co-authored by Yu Chen, an associate professor of environmental medicine at NYU, and Dr. Martin J. Blaser, chairman of NYU’s department of medicine.

Chen and Blaser assessed blood sugar levels using measurements of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c or A1c), a marker of excess glucose in the bloodstream that in recent years has become a key tool for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes.

H. pylori is a complicated bacterium.  Persistent H. pylori infections beginning in childhood have been linked decades later to ulcers of the stomach and small intestine, and a heightened risk of stomach cancer.  Although H. pylori can inflame the stomach, many infected people have no symptoms.

Blaser called H. pylori a complicated and interesting organism that affects children and adults in entirely different ways.  In previous work, he and Chen found that H. pylori protects children against asthma and allergy.

“This study provides further evidence of late-in-life cost to having H. pylori,” Blaser said in an interview.  The findings also give new support to “the concept of eradicating H. pylori in older people.”

Theoretically, antibiotics that wipe out H. pylori might protect older, overweight men and women from developing diabetes, Blaser and Chen said.  However, scientists still need to determine how eliminating H. pylori might affect Type 2 diabetes, and how H. pylori affects sugar breakdown among people of different weights.´╗┐

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Dec192011

Study: Maggots May Speed Large Wound Cleaning

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(CAEN, France) -- Maggots may be a source of relief for patients with large wounds, according to French researchers.

When doctors clean large wounds, they typically use enzymes or scalpels. A new study, however, found that maggots may offer a faster solution to removing dead tissue.

Researchers with leg ulcers were subjected to maggot therapy twice a week. The study compared the maggot treatment with the more conventional method, and found that the maggot patients were far cleaner.

While the maggots were more effective in cleaning the wounds, the study said that ultimately there was no difference in the speed of healing over the course of the study.

The maggot patients, who were blindfolded, did not report any sensations that made their skin crawl.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio´╗┐







ABC News Radio