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Entries in University of Minnesota (4)

Sunday
Apr172011

Study: Sociable Neighborhoods Increase Stroke Survival Chances

Creatas Images/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- The chances of an individual surviving a stroke may differ depending on what type of neighborhood the person lives in, according to a study published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Rush University studied over 5,000 senior citizens residing in three adjacent Chicago neighborhoods, interviewing study participants about their neighborhood and about how they interact with their neighbors. Other material analyzed in the study included figures from the National Death Index and Medicare claim files, which found 186 stroke deaths and 701 first-time strokes during an 11-year period.

According to a release from the American Heart Association, in their study, researchers factored out variables such as socioeconomic status and cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.

The study found that senior citizens residing in supportive neighborhoods tend to better stroke survival rates than others, regardless of other health or socioeconomic factors. The findings of the study show that there were no differences in the incidence of strokes, except for death rates. Researchers did note that benefits were not observed among African-Americans, for unclear reasons. The study also found that as neighborhood cohesion increased on the scoring system used, the survival rate also increased.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar252011

Study Suggests More Added Sugar Equals Weight Gain

Polka Dot/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- A new study suggests that added sugar intake is directly related to weight gain, according to HealthDay.

The study, which was conducted by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, examined Minnesota residents for 27 years. Researchers found that over the years patients ate less fat, but more carbohydrates and added sugar. The study also showed that the body-mass index of the patients corresponded with national trends in sugar consumption.

Researchers also found some intriguing differences between men and women. Men ate 38 percent more of their daily calories from added sugar in 2007-2009 than in 1980-1982. By contrast, women ate just under 10 percent more.

The study was presented at the American Heart Association conference in Atlanta on Thursday.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jan192011

Study Finds One in 12 Are Drunk at Major Sporting Events

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Many fans lucky enough to have tickets to one of the NFL conference championship games this weekend will cheer for their team with a beer in hand, and about one in 12 will leave the stadium legally drunk, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota say people under the age of 35 were eight times more likely to be legally drunk than other attendees, and fans who tailgate in the parking lot before the game were the worst offenders -- they were 14 times more likely to leave a game intoxicated.

In an anonymous survey given by the researchers after administering a breathalyzer test, one in four tailgaters owned up to downing at least five alcoholic beverages, with those in the highest BAC range knocking back an average of 6.6 drinks.

Doug Shavel, who has tailgated at New York Jets home games in Giants Stadium for more than 10 years, agreed that tailgating and drinking seem to go hand in hand.

"Everywhere you look voluminous quantities of alcohol are being consumed," he said. "People arrive by 9 a.m. for a [1 p.m.] kickoff and they're drinking the entire time. Some continue drinking postgame while they wait for the parking lot to clear out."

Shavel has seen a lot of bad behavior in his time that can be attributed to drinking. Once a drunken fan vomited on the person sitting next to him, then later he saw someone puking in the aisles. At another event, Shavel said he saw a man who was so inebriated he had to be carried out on a stretcher with an IV attached to his arm.

In his own tailgating circle, a friend once drank until he was so drunk he fell over into a pit of hot charcoal. "That's the exception, not the rule," Shavel insisted.

In fact, the percentage of drinkers discovered by the study may seem surprising low to anyone who has ever attended a sporting event and witnessed an alcohol-fueled fist fight or someone staggering through the stands.

But lead investigator Darin Erickson, an assistant professor of epidemiology and community health at University of Minnesota's School of Public Health said the numbers match up with findings from a previous study.

"People's perception of how many people get drunk at games may be somewhat distorted. Their estimates are likely greater than the actual numbers," he said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Dec212010

Tan Skin is In, But Many Don't Know the Risks

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Researchers at the University of Minnesota found that women are three times as likely to use indoor tanning facilities as men, and almost one third of 18- to 24-year-old women went to a tanning booth in the last 12 months. The use of indoor tanning went down as the women's age went up.

And when researchers asked study participants to list ways to avoid skin cancer, only about 13 percent of women and four percent of men suggested that people should avoid tanning booths.

"Tanning beds actually cause cancer," said Kelvin Choi, PhD, a research associate at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and lead author of the study. "I was surprised to see such a knowledge gap there."

Scientists analyzed data from more than 2,800 Caucasian study participants ages 18-64 who answered questions related to lifestyle, demographics and indoor tanning use. About a third of those participants also answered questions regarding skin cancer prevention.

The research showed that women who used indoor tanning booths were more likely to be from the Midwest and the South. They were also more likely to use spray tan products. And, as age increased, indoor tanning use decreased.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in Americans. About one in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives.

In 2007, the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the International Agency of Research on Cancer declared sources of radiation from artificial lights, like tanning beds, as carcinogenics, or cancer-causing substances.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







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