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Entries in Videos (3)

Wednesday
Jun222011

Girl, 5, Becomes Makeup Guru: How Young Is Too Young?

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Madison Hohrine of Hurst, Texas, is an expert at applying lipstick, applying blush to the contours of her cheeks and applying mascara to her eyes. She is such an expert, in fact, that millions of people are logging online every day to watch and learn from one of Madison's makeup tutorials.

What they see when one of Madison's videos pops up may surprise them. Madison is just 5, but despite her youth, Madison is a makeup-applying Internet sensation.

Her tutorials on the video-sharing site YouTube, in which she covers everything from her favorite lipsticks, to what beauty products to buy, to how to bring out the colors in your eyes with shadow, have generated over 1.2 million clicks. Her video tutorial on the intricacies of makeup brushes alone was viewed more than 700,000 times.

Madison became fascinated by makeup as so many little girls do, by watching her mom.

"I started watching the YouTube videos and she would watch them with me," Madison's mother, Mary Hohrine, told ABC’s Good Morning America. "And one day she just asked me if she could record herself just to see what she would look like doing the video."

A few brushes of blush and rehearsals in front of the camera later, and Madison was hooked.

Popping up more and more frequently next to Madison's videos on YouTube are those of other young girls, ages 3 to 11, who, like Madison, are just as well-versed in mascara as they are the fairytales and alphabet letters more familiar to childhood.

That young girls are both using grown-up cosmetics and airing their makeup tips online has some parenting experts raising their eyebrows.

"It's weird for a little girl to know about contouring and makeup and angles," Dr. Logan Levkoff, author of the book Third Base Ain't What it Used to Be, said to GMA.

"We have a society where we sexualize little girls, almost from birth on," she said.

In an age where celebrities, makeover shows and beauty pageants are all the rage, the trend is putting back in focus the question of whether little girls and makeup is too cute, or too much too soon. Experts such as Levkofk believe the young girls offering makeup tips online, and the public's fascination with them, are the result of today's pressure-filled, beauty-obsessed society.

"The fact is all these Toddlers & Tiaras shows, the products, whether it's push-up bras for tween girls or shapeups for girls to firm their butts, all of this sends the message that our girls aren't good enough," said the New York City-based psychologist.

"It's the message that our girls aren't valued."

But that is a message Mary Hohrine feels confident her daughter is not receiving.

"She is a normal 5-year-old," said Mary. "It's the same thing as if she's playing dress-up."

Mary says that does not mean she is not aware of the dangers of letting her daughter grow up too fast and so enforces strict rules when it comes to allowing Madison free reign with the blush, eye shadow and lipstick she flaunts online.

Though makeup made her famous, Madison is not allowed to use products or wear any makeup on a daily basis.

"When she asks to be putting makeup on every day, then I'll be getting worried," said Mary.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Mar222011

When Sexting Goes Viral Teens Suffer the Consequences

Goodshoot RF/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The proliferation of cellphones equipped with video cameras has made shooting and sending x-rated videos easier than ever for teenagers. The world of "sexting" -- sending sexually explicit text messages -- amongst teens that was once limited to raunchy words and pictures is increasingly moving into the video domain -- with devastating consequences.

According to a 2008 study by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, more than one in five teenage girls have sent or posted nude images of themselves.

The pressure to send illicit material is also beginning at shockingly young ages.

"I was asked for a picture in seventh grade," said 15-year-old high school student Jessica Pereira.

The explicit images are often made between teens in a relationship, but after the teens break up the videos can go viral.

When 16-year-old Julia Kirouac broke up with her boyfriend last fall, he shared the sexy images she says he pressured her into making for him. The humiliation sent Julia into a deep depression and in early February Julia downed a bottle of pills in an attempt to kill herself. She spent a week in the hospital recovering. Now, she says, she's learned a powerful lesson she wants to share with other teens.

"I just want them to know that they don't have to do anything that they don't want do," Julia said fighting back tears. "And if they think that they need to send pictures or videos, whatever it is, to a guy that they're dating or that they like, it's not worth it at all.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb212011

YouTube Vids on Cutting: Harmful or Helpful?

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(ONTARIO, Canada) -- YouTube provides easy access to videos of almost anything, but what is the impact on viewers, especially younger viewers, when "anything" includes hundreds of photos, video clips and montages of self-harming behaviors such as cutting and self-mutilation?

In a study that analyzed the videos, Canadian researchers found that the 100 most popular videos portraying self-harm on YouTube have been viewed more than 2 million times and selected as "favorite" more than 12,000 times, triggering concern over what kind of impact the sharing and viewing of these videos may be having on those at risk for self-injurious behavior.

"We found that very few videos actually encourage self-injury," says the lead author on the study, Stephen Lewis of the University of Guelph in Ontario. "Most were neutral or hopeful for overcoming this issue.”

Concerned for the potential risks, YouTube contacted researchers and has since removed the videos they considered inappropriate content, Lewis says.

Self-injury behavior, which, in the videos, most often took the form of self-cutting, is known as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) because while it involves the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue, it is not necessarily driven by a desire for suicide. Often, self-harmers report that cutting is a form of coping with emotional pain and that the act of inflicting pain on themselves provides powerful momentary relief from mental distress, says Kim Gratz, director of personality disorders research at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Though it's hard to gauge the prevalence of this behavior, Gratz says that studies find that between 17 and 40 percent of college students admit to committing self harm and between 15 and 30 percent of high school students do.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio