SEARCH

Friday
Dec102010

13 Million Packages of Rolaids Recalled

Photo Courtesy -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare(FORT WASHINGTON, Penn.) -- Johnson & Johnson recalled over 13 million packages of Rolaids antacids Thursday after reports that metal and wood particles were found in the products.

The voluntary recall of Rolaids Extra Strength Softchews, Rolaids Extra Strength plus Gas Softchews and Rolaids Multi-Symptom Plus Anti-Gas Softchews follows "a small number of adverse reports associated with the product being recalled," according to information posted on the Rolaid's website.

Vomiting, gum and tooth injury, and abnormal taste were among the adverse reactions reported. J&J's McNeil Consumer Healthcare business, which sells the products, stated that "risk of serious adverse health consequences [in connection with the recalled products] is remote," but have nonetheless advised consumers to discontinue use at this time.

The company says the materials were potentially introduced into the products during the manufacturing process at an outside plant, but McNeil spokeswoman Bonnie Jacobs declined to provide ABC News with the identity of this third-party manufacturer.

While McNeil investigates the cause of the recall, the company has suspended production of Rolaids Extra Strength Softchews, Rolaids Extra Strength plus Gas Softchews and Rolaids Multi-Symptom plus Anti-Gas Softchews.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Gibbs: President Obama Nine Months Smoke-Free

Photo Courtesy -- ABC News/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) – President Obama hasn’t smoked in nine months, according to White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs.

At Thursday's White House briefing, Gibbs told reporters he has "not seen or witnessed evidence of the president smoking in nine months," after he was asked a question about the president’s nicotine needs given recent statements by the Surgeon General that he has been working hard to quit.

"It's not something he's proud of," Gibbs said of Obama's struggles with kicking tobacco. "He knows it's not good for him. He doesn't like children to know about it, particularly his own."

Gibbs suggested it has been difficult for the president not to light up, especially during recent political fights over the tax-cut compromise and the START nuclear disarmament treaty.

 “When he might have found comfort in" a cigarette, said Gibbs of Obama, he "pushed it away."

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Plastic Surgery: Are Toes The New Nose?

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- For a growing number of women who want to strut their stuff in high heels, the latest footwear fashion accessories are surgical saws, titanium rods and liposuction needles.

Toe shortening and fat injections into the foot pad are among the popular procedures in a new plastic surgery craze focused on feet. Paying up to $3,000 per procedure, more and more women are surgically transforming themselves into Cinderella from the ankle down. Helping women squeeze into high heels -- and curing the damage they cause -- is a $45 million-a-year business.

"All the girls are wearing cute high heels, open toes and they look pretty, and me -- I have to wear always closed shoes because I feel like they're staring at my long toe," Audy, who asked to be identified by first name only, told ABC News. She was awaiting cosmetic surgery to make her second toe shorter than her big toe.

Podiatrist Ali Sadrieh in Beverly Hills, Calif., performs the toe shortening procedure, which involves actually dislocating the toe and sawing out a two-millimeter chunk of bone. He then inserts a titanium rod to bring the shortened bone back together.

Another procedure gaining traction in the world of foot facelifts plumps up the bottom of the foot to make high heel wearing more comfortable, like permanently installing a Dr. Scholl's pad. It involves liposuctioning fat from a patient's belly and injecting it into the balls of the feet.

And then there is the ever popular pinky toe tuck, in which fat is taken out of the little toe to make it narrower.

While cosmetic surgery on the feet is trending high with women as a permanent solution for their footwear crises, it is largely frowned upon by The American Podiatric Medical Association and officially opposed by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society because of risks and complications of the operation. Potential problems include permanent nerve damage, infection, scarring, a recurrence of the deformity that was supposedly fixed and chronic pain when wearing not just high heels, but all shoes, according to the AOFAS. 

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Weight Training Helps Breast Cancer Survivors 

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) -- Just as doctors now know heart attack and back pain patients can benefit from physical activity during recovery, a study published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association finds breast cancer survivors may benefit from pumping iron after surgery. 

The study, performed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, shows that breast cancer survivors who participated in a supervised, slowly progressive weight training program after undergoing surgery did not develop the painful, arm-swelling condition known as lymphedema -- and, in fact, may have even reduced or prevented the complication.

The researchers placed 154 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the previous five years, and who had had at least two lymph nodes removed but did not have lymphedema, into two randomly assigned groups. The first group was supervised by a personal trainer who led them through a 13-week weight lifting program, which they continued for another nine months at home. The second group didn't exercise.

By the end of the one-year study, the weight lifters had cut their risk of developing the condition by 35 percent. Only 11 percent of the group developed lymphedema, compared to 17 percent of those in the non-exercising group. Among women who had the most aggressive surgery, with five or more lymph nodes removed, the impact of the weightlifting intervention was even greater -- a nearly 70 percent risk reduction. Twenty-two percent of inactive participants developed lymphedema, compared to just 7 percent in the exercising group.

"Women have been told for decades that they should not do anything with the affected limb," said the study's lead author, Dr. Kathryn Schmitz, an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics and a member of Penn's Abramson Cancer Center. "Our work is showing that women who have had lymph nodes removed and have not developed cancer are less likely to develop arm swelling over time if they slowly and progressively increase the capacity of their damaged limb to withstand the stresses of real life like lifting their purse, moving heavy boxes or carrying a child."

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

US Life Expectancy Drops in 2008

Photo Courtesy -- Getty Images(ATLANTA) – The newest data released by the CDC Thursday showed that the average life expectancy in the U.S. has dropped.

The life expectancy for 2008 dropped by about three months from 2007, and is now 75 years for the average man and 80 years for the average woman.

Also in the report, stroke has fallen from the third-leading cause of death, for the first time in 50 years. It was bypassed by chronic lower respiratory diseases, including asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

Heart disease and cancer, however, remain the two leading causes of death as they accounted for nearly half of all deaths in the U.S. in 2008.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Study: Estrogen-Only Therapy May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(SAN ANTONIO) -- For years, doctors have warned women that taking hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, may be linked to an increased risk of breast cancer.  Now, a new study suggesting that a particular form of HRT may actually lower the risk of breast cancer in some women is likely to re-ignite the controversy surrounding this link.

The study, presented at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, uses previously collected data to suggest that menopausal women with no strong family history of breast cancer who are on estrogen replacement therapy may be at a 30-40 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer.

Lead researcher Dr. Joseph Ragaz, medical oncologist and clinical professor at the School of Population and Public Health at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, acknowledged the study results fly in the face of conventional thinking about findings contradicting a widely held belief about HRT.

"Our analysis suggests that, contrary to previous thinking, there is substantial value in bringing HRT with estrogen alone to [treatment] guidelines," said Ragaz in a press release.  "The data show that for selected women it is not only safe, but potentially beneficial for breast cancer, as well as for many other aspects of women's health."

Ragaz and his colleagues re-analyzed data from hormone replacement therapy trials of the Women's Health Initiative, a national health study aimed at developing strategies for preventing heart disease, breast cancer, colorectal cancer and bone fractures in postmenopausal women.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Surgeon General Says No Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Is Safe

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke, according to the latest surgeon general's report released Thursday.

The report, How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease, finds that even an occasional cigarette, inhaled directly or secondhand, "causes immediate damage to your body that can lead to serious illness or death."

Inhaling tobacco smoke exposes you to over 7,000 chemicals and compounds, hundreds of which are toxic and at least 70 of which cause cancer.  Regardless of whether a cigarette is filtered, low-tar or light, they still carry the same disease risk as regular ones.

Nearly half a million Americans die each year from exposure to tobacco smoke.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec092010

Nutmeg Treated as Drug for Hallucinogenic High

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(MIAMI) -- A sprinkle of nutmeg in eggnog or a pinch in apple pie can add the perfect punch to a holiday dessert.  But the spice has also made headlines as an unconventional way of getting high -- it's called a nutmeg high.

Nutmeg contains myristicin, a natural compound that has mind-altering effects if ingested in large doses.  The buzz can last one-to-two days and can be hallucinogenic, much like LSD.

According to reports this week from the ABC affiliate WPLG in Miami, the Florida Poison Information Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital has recently seen a small spike in phone calls reporting people who snorted, smoked or ate the spice.

About 30 minutes to an hour after taking large doses of nutmeg, people usually have severe gastrointestinal reactions, including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.  But that's just the beginning.  Hours into the high, people can suffer from heart and nerve problems, as well.

Visual, auditory or sensory hallucinations do not set in until hours after ingesting the spice, so there is also the worry that someone could overdose, thinking they haven't taken enough to feel anything.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec082010

Radiation Could Prevent Invasive Breast Cancer

Photo Courtesy -- Getty Images(NEW YORK) – Radiation after surgery could reduce the risk of developing invasive cancer in people with localized breast cancer, reports Healthday News.

The new study also suggests that the radiation treatment in combination with the drug Tamoxifen could help stop localized cancer from recurring.

Researchers studied patients with DCIS, the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer, and found that the risk of invasive cancer developing in the same breast was reduced by 70 percent with the addition of radiation.

The addition of Tamoxifen lowered the chance of non-invasive recurrent DCIS in the same breast by 60 percent.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec082010

Second-Hand Smoke Could Lead to Hearing Loss

Photo Courtesy -- Getty Images(ATLANTA) – A new study has revealed another side effect to breathing second-hand smoke, reports Science Daily.

According to research published in Tobacco Control, non-smokers who are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke are at an increased risk of levels of hearing loss.

The data, compiled from yearly household surveys and physical examinations of a sample of the U.S. population, determined that former smokers and passive smokers were both associated with impaired hearing. Previous studies have already determined that smokers are at a higher risk of impaired hearing.

About nine percent of those who have never smoked but have been exposed to second-hand smoke had a low- to mid-frequency of hearing loss. Just fewer than 27 percent had a high frequency of hearing loss.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio