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Friday
Jun232017

Fighter jet involved in accident at Dayton International Airport

Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(DAYTON, Ohio) -- An F-16 Thunderbird was involved in an accident on Friday at the Dayton International Airport, an airport spokesperson told ABC News.

There were no fatalities in the accident, the spokesperson said.

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds said in a statement that the plane was conducting a familiarization flight and that there was a "mishap" upon landing at 12:20 p.m. local time.

 

 

The pilot and the passenger -- a tactical aircraft maintainer -- are receiving medical care at a local hospital but are in good condition, the Air Force said. The plane sustained damage, the extent of which is unclear.

 

 

The accident is under investigation, the Air Force said in a statement.

"Our first priority is taking care of our Thunderbird teammates and ensuring future safety," said Lt. Col. Jason Heard, Thunderbirds commander and leader.

The Dayton Air Show is scheduled to take place Saturday and Sunday. Whether the performance will still take place is to be determined, the Air Force said.

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Friday
Jun232017

Video shows moment humpback whale breaches next to boat near New Jersey

Paul Ziolkowski(NEW YORK) -- These guys had a "whale" of a time when a humpback decided to give them a boat-side show in the New York harbor.

On Thursday, New Jersey native Paul Ziolkowski was boating near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in between New York and New Jersey when something "over-whale-ming" happened.

As seen in the video, a humpback whale breached directly next to their boat.

The men cursed in disbelief as their boat bobbed up and down in the aftermath.

"This definitely was one of the craziest experiences in my life, and I've had many," Ziolkowski wrote on his Facebook post.

At their feet in their boat they found a fish brought in from the wave that was generated from the whale's leap.

"I know it sounds like a fish story ... but these #NewJersey waters are serious," Ziolkowski joked in his Facebook post.

As the video shows, right after the whale swam away, a nearby boat started cheering at what they’d just seen.

"I got that on film too," Ziolkowski yelled to a nearby boat.

In the video, the other boat occupants were so amazed by the experience they witnessed, they asked for him to text them the video he took.

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Friday
Jun232017

Dancing gorilla channels his inner 'Maniac' in kiddie pool

ABCNews.com(DALLAS) -- This dancing gorilla channeling his inner “Maniac” in his kiddie pool at the Dallas Zoo is captivating the hearts of the internet.

Zola, a 14-year-old Western lowland gorilla, showed off his awesome moves, spinning around in his pool flailing his arms to splash the water, and it’s basically encompassing how everyone feels about it being Friday.

“This is Zola 100 percent,” Ashely Orr, the primate supervisor who recorded the hilarious video, wrote to ABC News. “He is probably one of the goofiest and fun-loving gorillas in our troop at the Dallas Zoo.”

The zoo’s YouTube video of Zola’s next-level moves, which has nearly 200,000 views, has sparked social media users to come up with their own renditions of the video, adding music over his antics to make it even funnier.

“We knew Zola had a knack for dancing, but had no idea he’d show off his moves that day,” Orr said. “We were cleaning the building and heard the splashing, so we ran over to see him in all his excitement. It’s always rewarding to see our animals really enjoy the enrichment items we put out for them to explore.”

She said Zola’s kiddie pool was “a treat” for him because he doesn’t always get to have one, “but when he does he thoroughly enjoys it.”

“For enrichment to be effective it has to be different -- and this certainly sparked his interest and dance moves that day,” said Orr.

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Friday
Jun232017

Stuffed cow saves boy in fall from second-floor window

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Many children have a favorite stuffed toy they keep close, and for a 2-year-old boy in Massachusetts, that devotion paid off.

Eduardo Jose Luis Gomez was clutching his large, stuffed cow when he fell 16 feet out a second-floor window to the concrete below.

“It’s a good distance and luckily for him, you know, the stuffed animal did absorb most of the impact,” Chelsea Deputy Fire Chief John Quatieri told the ABC affiliate in Boston, WCVB-TV.

Conscious and alert after the fall, Gomez was held at Massachusetts General Hospital for observation and is expected to be OK.

A toy story with a happy ending.

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Friday
Jun232017

Hospital officials: Attack left Flint airport cop with 12-inch gash on his neck

Jeff Neville/Facebook(FLINT, Mich.) -- The man who stabbed a police officer at the Bishop International Airport in Flint, Michigan, left the officer with an approximately 12-inch long laceration from his Adam's apple to the back of his neck, a hospital official said Friday morning.

Lt. Jeff Neville was assaulted outside the airport's Transportation Security Administration screening area on Wednesday morning, allegedly by a Canadian man, in an attack that is being investigated as an act of terrorism, officials said. Neville is in stable condition and expected to fully recover, according to hospital officials.

Neville was able to stop the assault within a minute and "never stopped fighting" until the attacker was in handcuffs, according to airport officials.

An airport maintenance worker also jumped in and helped restrain the attacker, according to Airport Director Craig Williams.

"I believe he saved Jeff’s life," Williams said.

Hospital officials said that Neville was calm after the attack and appeared to understand the situation he was in.

The 12-inch knife used in the attack had an 8-inch serrated blade.

It sliced through the muscles in the officer's neck but likely avoided further damage by "a matter of millimeters," said Dr. Donald Scholten, a trauma surgeon at Hurley Medical Center.

The knife "was probably very, very close to severing his major artery and nerve," Scholten said Friday, adding that it could have also severed "his windpipe and digestive system."

"This was a significant force," Scholten said. "This was not a shaving nick."

Neville underwent surgery shortly after the assault, officials said, and he received at least 50 stitches.

Officials said Friday that Neville is making progress and expected to be discharged within a few days.

Neville has been an airport employee since 2001, Williams said, adding that he is "well-loved by everybody here just for his personality, his professionalism. He treats everybody with respect."

During Wednesday's attack, the suspect, Amor Ftouhi, allegedly yelled "Allahu Akbar," (God is great), according to David Gelios of the FBI.

Gelios said Ftouhi "continued to exclaim 'Allah' and he made a statement to the effect of, 'You killed people in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan' and 'We're all going to die.'"

After Ftouhi was taken into custody and interviewed by authorities, officials said it appeared he had "a hatred for the United States and a variety of other things that motivated him ... to conduct this act of violence."

A criminal complaint was filed against Ftouhi on Wednesday for "violence at an international airport," but officials noted that there could be more charges in the future.

Ftouhi made an initial appearance in court Wednesday evening and ordered temporarily detained without bond, prosecutors said. His public defender did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.

The ongoing investigation into the incident is part of a joint operation between the U.S. and Canada, officials said.

Ftouhi legally entered the U.S. in Lake Champlain, New York, on June 16, and later traveled to Flint, Gelios said.

No one else appears to have been involved and there is no information to suggest a wider plot, officials said.

The airport, which was evacuated and shut down Wednesday, later reopened. No passengers were harmed in the attack, officials said.

Ftouhi's next hearing is set for June 28.

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Friday
Jun232017

Michael Brown's family wins $1.5 million settlement

Courtesy Brown Family(FERGUSON, Mo.) -- The family of Michael Brown, an African American teen whose fatal shooting by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, sparked large-scale protests, has settled their lawsuit against the city for $1.5 million, said Apollo Carey, the city attorney for Ferguson.

The settlement amount was paid by the city's insurance company "on behalf of multiple defendants," the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber's order approving the settlement didn't mention the amount, but he said the split of the amount between Brown's parents, Michael Brown Sr. and Lesley McSpadden, is "fair and reasonable" and "provides for a reasonable amount" for attorney fees and expenses, the Post-Dispatch reported.

The judge ordered the settlement agreement sealed, writing that its disclosure "could jeopardize the safety of individuals involved in this matter, whether as witnesses, parties, or investigators," the newspaper reported.

Brown's family filed suit in 2015 against the city, former Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson, and former police officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed the 18-year-old on Aug. 9, 2014.

A St. Louis County grand jury declined to indict Wilson, and the U.S. Justice Department declined to prosecute him, citing evidence and witnesses supporting Wilson’s claims that Brown attacked him, the Post-Dispatch reported.

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Friday
Jun232017

Former US diplomat on advising American student's family during North Korea detainment

Xinhua/Lu Rui via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A former U.S. diplomat, who said he counseled Otto Warmbier’s family for over a year after he was detained in North Korea, said the conversation he had with the family after they learned Otto’s dire medical condition was one of the most emotional of his career.

“It was a very, very, very emotional exchange,” Evans Revere told ABC News' Bob Woodruff in an interview for ABC News' 20/20. “I’ve never had a conversation with anyone than [the] likes of the one I had with [Warmbier’s father] Fred Warmbier that day. I was in tears.”

Revere retired from the Foreign Service in 2007 after spending years as one of the U.S. State Department’s top Asia experts. He now works as a private consultant for American families, using his contacts in North Korea to try to bring home detained loved ones.

Revere said he started working with the Warmbier family “within a day or so” after their son was taken into custody.

“I gave them the same advice that I’d given to other families,” Revere said. “They needed to be careful about the things that they might say, that the North Koreans might take offense [and] that might cause the North Koreans to react very angrily and badly.”

Warmbier, a University of Virginia student from Wyoming, Ohio, was 21 when he was detained in North Korea and held for nearly 17 months before he was medically evacuated and flown to Cincinnati on June 13. He was then rushed to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, where doctors said Warmbier was suffering from “severe neurological injury” and had slipped into what they called a state of unresponsive wakefulness. North Korea claimed that he slipped into a coma after contracting botulism and taking a sleeping pill shortly after his sentencing.

Warmbier died on Monday. His family declined an autopsy and said in a statement that their son had “completed his journey home.”

He was arrested in January 2016 at the airport in Pyongyang for allegedly trying to steal a propaganda poster while he was visiting North Korea on a sightseeing tour organized by the Chinese-based company Young Pioneer Tours. North Korea regarded his alleged act as a “significant offense” against their sovereignty, Revere said.

After a one-hour trial in March 2016, Warmbier was convicted and sentenced to 15 years of hard labor.

Revere said it is difficult to know for sure whether Warmbier would have served the full 15 years. One of the first things Revere said he told the family was that their son would be released when the North Koreans were “done with him, when he is no longer of value to them, when they don’t see any utility to his continued incarceration.”

Sue Mi Terry, a senior research scholar at Columbia University who served as a senior analyst on North Korea for the CIA from 2001 to 2008, said the North Koreans can see American hostages as a “bargaining chip.”

“You can get a high-level visit from Washington, and that is a good propaganda coup domestically to say, ‘Look they came, they bowed before me, and I am a benevolent ruler getting and freeing these people,’" Terry said. “So you can always use American hostages as leverage.”

Terry made note of the fact that four days after Warmbier was arrested, on Jan. 6, 2016, the North Koreans conducted their fourth nuclear test.

“By the time they arrested Otto, they knew they were going to have a nuclear weapons test,” Terry said. “It takes weeks to prepare such a test. So they had in mind that they were going to do nuclear tests, and there’s going to be sanctions that follow.”

When the North Koreans began calling their American hostages “prisoners of war,” Revere realized the situation was changing.

“They kept using that word in a meeting with me,” Revere said. “I realized that what they were trying to tell me was that all bets were off in terms of the rules that they were required to follow in dealing with Americans.”

In April, the Warmbier family decided to break their silence. They gave an interview to Fox News host Tucker Carlson, in which they said the State Department had been “absolutely no” help in getting their son back and that when they met with then-Secretary of State John Kerry, they found him to be “totally exasperated and overwhelmed with North Korea.”

At a press conference last week, Warmbier’s father, Fred Warmbier, was asked if the Obama administration should have done more to help.

“I think the results speak for themselves,” he replied, adding that they decided to speak out because they were frustrated by the situation.

The Warmbiers also met with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who also served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, who said he made numerous efforts to bring their son home.

“My organization [The Richardson Center] worked with the family, briefed them, tried to get Otto out,” Richardson told ABC News. “I personally met with the North Koreans 20 times in the last year at the United Nations.”

The Warmbiers declined ABC News’ repeated requests for an interview.

Revere said he had heard this “sense of frustration and anger” from the Warmbier family during the time he was advising them."

“And I understand it,” he continued. “I sympathize with their feelings, even if I don’t necessarily agree with how they voice those frustrations.”

Revere never met or spoke with Otto Warmbier and was not directly involved with the negotiations for his release, which were handled between the State Department and the North Koreans.

He said the last conversation he had with the Warmbier family was shortly after they learned of their son’s condition, but he hopes he can continue to advise them in the future.

“I feel in a certain way I became part of their extended family,” he said. “I never met Otto Warmbier but I have tremendous respect for him and the life that he led as a young man.”

Watch the full story on ABC News' 20/20 Friday, June 23, at 10 p.m. ET.

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Friday
Jun232017

LAPD officer accused of unlawful sex with 15-year-old in department's youth cadet program

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck says he personally arrested one of his own officers on Thursday.

Beck arrested 10-year veteran LAPD officer Robert Cain in what has become the latest scandal involving the department’s youth cadet program. The 31-year-old officer is accused of having a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old female cadet.

The chief, who usually does not make arrests, said “I told him you’re under arrest for unlawful sex with a minor.”

It is unclear if Cain has a lawyer.

The officer is from the same police station, the LAPD’s 77th Street Division, that has been roiled in a scandal involving teen cadets who allegedly stole LAPD patrol SUV’s, crashing two of them in chases last week after they were spotted by on duty officers. The teens are also accused of stealing equipment like police radios and bullet proof vests.

Beck says the teens pulled over drivers and impersonated officers with the stolen equipment but that they did not handcuff anyone.

The 15-year-old girl allegedly involved in the sexual relationship is one of seven cadets who have been arrested for stealing the patrol vehicles. Cain worked in the equipment room where police gear is checked out. Beck says he is not sure yet if Cain helped the teens obtain the stolen items.

When Beck learned of the alleged criminal conduct involving Cain, he said he made the decision to make the arrest himself.

“I think it’s important to send a message,” Beck said during a news conference. “I find the actions of Cain, if they are proven, to be despicable. I find them to be absolutely inconsistent with the ethics and standards of the Los Angeles Police Department and they are criminal. I’m a police officer and I felt it was my duty to make the arrest.”

Beck said the sexual conduct did not happen at the police station and that the relationship was consensual.

The Los Angeles Police union representing LAPD officers is applauding Beck for taking quick action after the department learned about the relationship while investigating the stolen equipment and SUVs.

Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti said in a statement, "There is no higher priority than protecting and guiding our young people -- and when they become LAPD Cadets, every parent should feel confident that they will be treated with the utmost care every step of the way."

Garcetti continues, "The charges against this officer are deeply disturbing, and I have been assured he will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. These allegations represent a total breach of the trust we place in everyone who wears the uniform and a violation of the oath all officers take to protect and serve. There is an exhaustive review of the Cadet Program already underway, and I have faith that our program will emerge stronger and justice will be served.”

Last week Beck suspended the youth programs at the 77th Street and Pacific Divisions. Cadets from both stations have been arrested.

Beck says he still supports the program for troubled teens that includes some 2,300 cadets and plans to attend an upcoming graduation ceremony.

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Friday
Jun232017

VA man charged with espionage for allegedly delivering top-secret documents to China

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Kevin Patrick Mallory, 60, was arrested and charged Thursday with espionage and making false statements for allegedly delivering top-secret and secret documents to a suspected Chinese spy.

According to the criminal complaint, Mallory traveled to Shanghai in March and April and met with someone who represented himself as working for a Chinese think tank. However, the Chinese intelligence service often uses this organization as a cover for its intelligence officers, according to the FBI.

The Chinese intelligence agency is known to pay their sources not only in cash, but also through other means like business considerations.

According to the complaint, upon returning from Shanghai in April, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) did a “secondary search” of Mallory when he arrived at Chicago O’Hare Airport.

During that search, CBP found $16,500 in his two carry-on bags, an amount he did not declare on his customs form, according to court documents.

Mallory allegedly told CBP that he was in China on a business trip as well as a father/son vacation.

According to the complaint, between March and April, Mallory contacted former co-workers, to help put him in touch with an employee at a U.S. government agency, which is not specified in the court documents.

The complaint also stated that during a subsequent meeting he told the government employee that he was given a communication device from the Chinese contact and he had been trained to use it.

On May 24, he was planning to meet with that person again, but instead, he was greeted by FBI agents, at which point he volunteered to an interview and search of his device, according to the complaint.

He told FBI investigators that he believed the contact worked for the Chinese intelligence service and that he was a former U.S. government employee who had “training and overseas experience, which made it easy for him to spot tradecraft,” the court documents read.

He also told the FBI that he had been given a device and was trained to “use it specifically for private communications” with his Chinese contact -- someone he told authorities he was introduced to initially as a potential client, according to the court documents.

During an FBI review of his electronic device, Mallory voluntarily showed agents how to move from normal message mode to secure mode.

“When doing this, Mallory expressed surprise at seeing some message history,” according to the court document.

One message he had allegedly sent said, "I can also come in the middle of June I can bring the remainder of the documents I have at that time."

Mallory told the agents that it was a reference to “two white papers” regarding open-source information and that he was just stringing along the contact, according to the complaint.

Upon additional searching, the FBI allegedly found additional messages, including one that read, “Your object is to gain information, and my object is to be paid for.”

A handwritten index was also allegedly found on the device that described eight different documents. Four of the eight were found stored on the device. According to the complaint, of those four, three contained classified information and one was classified at the “top-secret level.”

Mallory, who speaks fluent Mandarin, is self-employed with GlobalEx LLC, a company he founded in 2010, according to court documents.

He previously worked for the U.S. government in various capacities. He held an active security clearance when he worked for the government, but it was terminated when he left in 2012, according to the criminal complaint.

He made his initial appearance in the Eastern District of Virginia federal court Thursday at which he wore shorts and a tank top and requested a court-appointed attorney. A detention hearing is scheduled for Friday.

The FBI searched Mallory’s home in Virginia Thursday evening. FBI agents were seen bringing boxes out of the front door and loading up the back of a black SUV. K-9 dogs also searched the property.

"I just know he was a pretty quiet guy, kept to himself, nice, nothing out of the ordinary,” said neighbor Cameron Norris. “I think everyone's just shocked, pretty surprised, definitely didn't see this coming."

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Thursday
Jun222017

Teen killed by bullet when LA County deputies fired at pit bull: Sheriff's office

blinow61/iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- As Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies were shooting at a pit bull that was charging at them, a 17-year-old boy was apparently struck in the chest by one of the bullets and died, the sheriff's office said.

The shooting happened at about 3:45 a.m. Thursday in Palmdale, California, after deputies responded to a report of loud music, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office said in a statement. As the deputies walked up the driveway, a 60- to 65-pound pit bull "aggressively charged at the deputies and attacked one of them," biting the deputy on the knee, the sheriff's department said.

At that time, a young man came out from behind an apartment complex and restrained the dog and took it to the back of the building, the sheriff's office said.

Deputies were helping the injured officer and waiting for paramedics when "the pit bull came from the rear of the apartment and again charged at deputy personnel," the sheriff's office reported. "At that point, two deputies shot at the pit bull from a 5- to 7-feet distance, at which time, the pit bull retreated back to the rear of the apartment complex into the carport area."

The deputies went to the back of the complex "in an attempt to corral the dog to prevent additional victims," the sheriff's office said, and as they walked to the rear carport area, they found a teenager on the ground who appeared to have been shot in the chest, the sheriff's office said. The teen was hospitalized and later died.

The sheriff's office said "detectives believe when the juvenile came out from behind the building, which was approximately 40 feet away from where the shooting occurred with the dog, the juvenile may have been struck by one of the skip rounds." Capt. Christopher Bergner of the sheriff’s office said it appeared that the "skip round" that hit the teenager had ricocheted off the ground, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The deputy bitten by the pit bull was also hit in the leg by a bullet fragment, the sheriff's office said. According to the Los Angeles Times, Bergner said in a press conference the deputy's injury also appeared to have been from a skip round that had ricocheted off the ground. He was transported to a hospital and is listed in stable condition, the sheriff's office said.

The sheriff's department said the investigation is ongoing. Because this was a fatal deputy-involved shooting, separate investigations will be conducted by the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner - Coroner, Sheriff's Homicide Bureau and Internal Affairs Bureau, the sheriff's office said. The Office of the Inspector General is expected to provide independent oversight during the investigation and the Los Angeles County District Attorney is also involved. "Once concluded, every aspect of the shooting is reviewed by the Sheriff's Executive Force Review Committee," the sheriff's office added.

The pit bull will be euthanized, the sheriff's office said.

Nicole Nishida, a spokeswoman for the sheriff's department, said the department's policy for using a firearm on an animal is, "Personnel may use firearms to employ deadly force when dealing with animals when they reasonably believe that death or serious physical injury is about to be inflicted upon themselves or others.

"The shooting of animals that are not a threat of serious bodily injury to a person has proved to be inherently dangerous to bystanders as well as Deputy personnel. Therefore, Department members shall not use firearms to shoot animals fighting with other animals (e.g., dogs)," Nishida said. "If it becomes necessary to destroy an injured (euthanasia) by use of a firearm and the conditions are such that there is an extended or inappropriate response time by the animal control agency, authorization to use a firearm on an animal must be obtained from an on-scene supervisor."

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