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Friday
Aug102018

Ahead of Charlottesville anniversary, Heather Heyer's mom urges people to 'think about what she was here for' 

ABC News(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The spot where counter protester Heather Heyer was killed when a car plowed down a street during the Charlottesville protest last year has become an unlikely space of refuge for her mother.

"This is where I feel a connection to Heather," Susan Bro said while visiting that area on 4th Street, now renamed "Honorary Heather Heyer Way," with ABC News' Eva Pilgrim.

Bro noted that Heyer "is with me all the time" but "this is where she was taken from me."

"Sometimes I come in the evening ... to sort of commune with the energy that's here," she said.

Bro is speaking out ahead of the upcoming anniversary of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, when Heyer, 32, was killed on Aug. 12.

Events are slated to be held in Charlottesville this weekend. Law enforcement officials have already released public guidelines and the governor of Virginia has already called for a state of emergency to be in place.

"Maybe we're in a little bit of overkill with the police state coming, maybe not. It is what it is," Bro said.

"I'm moving forward and we're trying to make the world a better place. Either get on board or get out of the way," she said.

In an interview for ABC News' "Start Here" podcast, Bro said that she has turned to activism instead of "dwelling in hate or anger."

"I think if we don't focus on fixing the issues that caused this in the first place, the racial divide in our country, then we're going to be right back at Charlottesville in no time flat," Bro told "Start Here."

The heartbroken mom said she's spoken to "hundreds of thousands of people" about how to address these issues, adding that she was surprised by the number of people who were determined to take a stand when they heard stories about her daughter.

"I've had conversations with many people that I've never met, who've simply listened to something that I've said, or read about Heather's life, or heard about what's going on, and they say they're standing up and speaking out now."

Ahead of the anniversary of Heyer's death this weekend, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, in declaring the state of emergency, asked Virginians to "make alternative plans to engaging with planned demonstrations of hate."

There are small memorial events planned in Charlottesville, but police in Washington, D.C., are preparing for any fallout from a planned "Unite the Right" parade and rally.

Bro said she believes any counter-protesters will be "a little more wary and cautious" after seeing what happened last year in Charlottesville, but she insisted that ignoring white nationalist groups is not the answer.

They “crave silence or violence,” she said.

Instead, she’s calling for loud, non-violent resistance.

"If we ignore them, they think they have won because they have had the ... playing field all to themselves. If we give them violence, they believe they have won because they have pushed your buttons and maybe taken out a few."

This story is featured in Friday's edition of the ABC News "Start Here" podcast.

"Start Here" is a daily ABC News podcast hosted by Brad Mielke featuring original reporting on stories that are driving the national conversation. Listen for FREE on the ABC News app, Apple Podcasts, TuneIn, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play Music, or iHeartRadio. Ask Alexa: Play Start Here, or add the "Start Here" skill to your Flash Briefing.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Friday
Aug102018

Record heat scorches the West as Northeast prepares to get soaked

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Heading into the weekend, gusty winds of 30 to 40 mph from California into Montana could exacerbate wildfires and lead to more record-high temperatures.

More fire and heat warnings have been issued across the region.

Temperatures are expected to dip slightly over the next few days after the Pacific Northwest has seen one of its hottest stretches on record. California may be a tiny bit cooler as well.

 A storm system and cold front are combining to produce what could be a very soggy weekend for the Northeast.

Low pressure moving in from the West will stall, bringing lots of moisture, including heavy rain along the Interstate-95 corridor. Some areas could see as much as 4 inches.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Friday
Aug102018

California governor declares state of emergency as fires threaten thousands of homes

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for two counties near Los Angeles Thursday night, as the nearby Holy wildfire exploded in size.

The Holy Fire is just one of 13 large wildfires currently burning across California, five of which remain under 50 percent contained. Altogether, the various blazes have scorched more than 671,000 acres, destroyed or damaged over 2,000 structures and have forced thousands of residents from their homes.

The massive Holy fire, which ignited in Southern California's Cleveland National Forest Monday afternoon, has spread rapidly and nearing Orange and Riverside counties. The fast-moving fire had burned an area of more than 18,000 acres by Friday morning and was only 5 percent contained, officials said.

Throngs of firefighters are on the front lines battling the blaze, using fire engines, helicopters and bulldozers. Mandatory evacuations were still in effect for various communities Friday morning.

The official cause of the Holy Fire is still under investigation, but a man, Forrest Gordon Clark, is accused of setting the fire in Cleveland National Forest's Trabuco Canyon.

The Orange County Fire Authority arrested Clark on Wednesday on suspicion of felony arson. The 51-year-old Trabuco Canyon resident was scheduled to be arraigned Friday on the following charges: one felony count each of aggravated arson of five or more inhabited structures, arson of inhabited property, arson of forest, criminal threats; two felony counts of resisting and deterring an executive officer; and a sentencing enhancement for arson burning multiple structures.

Clark is being held on $1 million bail and faces a maximum sentence of life in state prison, according to the Orange County District Attorney's Office.

No major injuries linked to the Holy Fire have been reported, but the Carr Fire in Northern California has been blamed for the deaths of at least eight people, officials said.

The "mechanical failure of a vehicle" ignited the Carr Fire in Whiskeytown on July 23, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The flames ripped through northwest Shasta County then spread southeast for days, with little containment, as it swept across the Sacramento River and roared toward the city limits of Redding, which is home to 92,000 people.

By Friday morning, the blaze had burned an are of more than 181,000 acres in Shasta and Trinity counties. Some 1,600 homes, businesses and other structures have been destroyed by the Carr Fire, while hundreds of others have been damaged.

Gusty winds, high temperatures and dry vegetation have spurred fire growth. But thousands of firefighters who have been continuously battling the Carr Fire have made progress in recent days. The blaze was at a containment of 51 percent Friday morning, officials said.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Friday
Aug102018

Heather Heyer's mom warns against ceding ground to white nationalists

Andrew Shurtleff-Pool/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A year after Heather Heyer was killed at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, her mother, Susan Bro, has turned to activism instead of "dwelling in hate or anger."

"I think if we don't focus on fixing the issues that caused this in the first place, the racial divide in our country, then we're going to be right back at Charlottesville in no time flat," Susan Bro told ABC News' "Start Here" podcast.

Bro said she's spoken to "hundreds of thousands of people" about how to address these issues, adding that she was surprised by the amount of people who were determined to take a stand when they heard stories about her daughter.

"I've had conversations with many people that I've never met, who've simply listened to something that I've said, or read about Heather's life, or heard about what's going on, and they say they're standing up and speaking out now."

 On Aug. 12, 2017, Heyer, 32, was killed when a car plowed into a group of counterprotesters who were demonstrating against a Unite the Right rally spurred by Charlottesville's plan to remove a Confederate statue from a local park.

Bro told "Start Here" she often visits that area on 4th Street, now renamed "Honorary Heather Heyer Way," where visitors leave messages like, "No Place for Hate" and "Gone, But Not Forgotten."

"I often go down there on my own in the evenings sometimes," she said. "Or just to stop and read the messages that people have left, and kind of absorb Heather's energy, the energy of people who have written on the walls of the street there. There's always a box of chalk available for people to write with."

 Ahead of the one-year anniversary of Heyer's death this weekend, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency and asked Virginians to "make alternative plans to engaging with planned demonstrations of hate."

There are small memorial events planned in Charlottesville, but police in Washington, D.C., are preparing for any fallout from a planned Unite the Right parade and rally.

Bro said she believes any counterprotesters will be "a little more wary and cautious" after seeing what happened last year in Charlottesville, but she insisted that ignoring white nationalist groups is not the answer, saying they “crave silence or violence.” Instead, she’s calling for loud, non-violent resistance.

"If we ignore them, they think they have won because they have had the...playing field all to themselves. If we give them violence, they believe they have won because they have pushed your buttons and maybe taken out a few."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

Teen pushed from bridge speaks out from hospital

KATU(VANCOUVER, Wash) -- The 16-year-old girl who said her friend pushed her off a bridge into a river spoke out Thursday from a hospital in Vancouver, Washington.

Jordan Holgerson suffered five broken ribs and lung injury after she was pushed of the Moulton Falls Bridge on the Lewis River outside Vancouver, a suburb of Portland, Oregon.

Surveillance camera footage shows the girl was standing on a bridge ledge and was pushed off by another girl standing behind.

Holgerson said she initially wanted to jump off the bridge after she saw a friend do it, ABC News’s affiliate KATU reported.

“I went to the top of the bridge and my other – my friend ... she came up to the bridge with me,” Holgerson she told KATU as she described the moments leading up to the push. “And so, she was counting down, but I didn’t think anything of it. And I was like, ‘No, don’t count down, like, I won’t go if you count down. I’m not ready.’ And then, she pushed me.”

Holgerson told KATU she didn’t feel any pain but adrenaline hit her after she was pushed in the water.

“And then an EMT that was off-duty helped me onto the rocks and just a whole bunch of people surrounding me were helping me, calming me down,” Holgerson said.

“In the air I was trying to push myself forward, so I could be like straight up and down that make my head hit first but that definitely did not work,” she told KATU during the interview at the hospital.

Talking from a hospital to KATU, in a chair surrounding by her friends, Holgerson advised those who are at precarious heights to be alert.

“If it's that high just make sure that you know what you are doing,” she said.

Even though Holgerson expects it to be six weeks before her pain subsides and six months before she can participate in sports, she told KATU that she is grateful to be alive.

“I am happy to be OK,” she said.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

Stanford swimmer Brock Turner has appeal and request for new trial denied 

ABC News(STANFORD, Calif.) -- The Stanford swimmer whose light sentence after a sexual assault conviction had both his appeal and request for a new trial denied.

The latest legal step in the controversial case of Brock Turner came Wednesday when his appeal to have his convictions overturned was rejected by a California appeallate court on Wednesday.

In an earlier hearing about the appeal, Turner's attorney argued that since his client was clothed during the assault, Turner participated in "outercourse" rather than intercourse.

The latest decision rejecting the appeal, which was written by a panel of three judges, affirms the decision to convict Turner on three counts: sexual penetration of an unconscious person, sexual penetration of an intoxicated person, and assault with intent to commit rape. The decision details Turner's arguments against each conviction, along with the rebuttals from the appellate judges.

On the count of assault with intent to commit rape, the judges note that two graduate students saw the assault happening and helped secure Turner as he allegedly tried to flee the scene.

"While it is true that defendant did not expose himself, he was interrupted. Jurors reasonably could have inferred from the evidence described above that, if the graduate students had not stopped defendant, he would have exposed himself and raped Jane 1," the decision states.

According to the appellate decision, Turner and his attorneys argued that his convictions are "supported by insufficient evidence," but the appellate court found "that argument lacks merit."

The case stems from a sexual assault that happened after a fraternity party in January 2015, when Turner was a 19-year-old freshman at the prestigious university and the victim, identified only as Jane Doe, was a 22-year-old recent college graduate who went to the party with friends.

Turner was convicted in 2016 of sexually assaulting the woman, who shared her story in court, detailing how she was unconscious and had no memory of much of the night.

Turner was sentenced to six months in jail, prompting outrage over what was widely-seen as a far lighter sentence than the multi-year term he could have faced for such a conviction.

The judge in the original trial, Judge Aaron Persky was recalled by voters in June, with much of the support for his removal stemming from his decision in the Turner case.

Turner ended up serving three months in jail and was released in September 2016.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

Investigators working to identify remains found at squalid New Mexico compound

Taos County Sheriffs Office(TAOS COUNTY, N.M.) -- Investigators in New Mexico are working to identify remains that were found on the squalid campgrounds where police found 11 children living with five adults.

"The remains are in a state of decomposition that has made identification challenging," Chief Medical Investigator Kurt Nolte said in a statement.

"Investigators often try to compare remains to radiologic images, fingerprints, DNA or other identification materials. At this time, investigators are using all known methods to make an identification, but this will not be a quick process. If we must rely on DNA results, identification could take many weeks," he said in the statement.

The search of the decrepit compound occurred in response to a search warrant for Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, who was believed to have kidnapped his then-3-year-old son in Georgia.

When officers searched the compound, they found 11 children under the age of 15 and five adults, including Wahhaj, but not the young kidnapped boy.

Taos County Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe said Tuesday that the remains belonged to a young boy.

The remains were found on Monday on an "inner portion" of the compound, Hogrefe said.

Wahhaj is under investigation in the death of the child.

All five adults -- including Wahhaj, another adult male and three adult women -- have been arrested and charged with 11 counts of felony child abuse. Wahhaj was also charged with child abduction, while the other adult male, Lucas Morten, was charged with harboring a fugitive.

Wahhaj did not enter a plea when he appeared in court Wednesday afternoon. A judge ruled that he be held until a no-bond hearing takes place within the next five days.

The four other adults also appeared in court Wednesday. Morton and two of the women pleaded not guilty, while a third woman did not enter a plea.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

Man behind fight for sharing 3-D printed gun blueprints on why he’s advocating for 'the people's right to keep and bear arms' 

ABC News(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Cody Wilson has been called “one of the most dangerous people on the Internet.”

For years, Wilson has fought to make sure anyone should be able to download the files to make a gun at home with the click of a button using a 3-D printer or a computer automated milling machine.

“I’ve demonstrated ... especially these last few weeks [that] the idea of gun control in the internet age is inoperable,” Wilson told ABC News’ Nightline.

Last week, a federal judge temporarily stopped him from putting gun blueprints online -- the latest chapter in an ongoing battle with the federal government, 19 states, the District of Columbia and gun control advocates.

“If Cody Wilson is not stopped, then what we will find is a universe where the internet has plans to 3-D print any kind of weapon anybody wants, with printers that make that incredibly easy for someone to do in only a few hours in their garage or in their living room,” Avery Gardiner, co-president of the Brady Campaign, told Nightline.

Wilson invited Nightline to Austin, Texas, which is the home of his company Defense Distributed.

The 30-year-old said he originally wanted to be a lawyer.

“I had a better idea,” Wilson said. His idea was, “Could you make WikiLeaks for guns?”

In 2012, he and his friends were some of the first people to 3-D print a plastic gun, which they called “The Liberator.”

They shared the blueprint file on the internet, where Wilson says it was downloaded more than 100,000 times in just the first week.

That’s when the federal government jumped. The State Department argued that by posting the blueprints, Wilson was basically doing the same thing as exporting weapons abroad. Wilson took down the blueprints, and in 2015 filed a lawsuit against the State Department arguing that the digital gun blueprints are a form of free speech.

Wilson says it’s both a First Amendment issue and a Second Amendment issue.

“It’s both, but the way that this had to be fought for years in court was on a First Amendment claim,” Wilson said.

Andy Greenberg, a senior writer at WIRED, has covered Wilson and the digital DIY gun debate since 2012.

“If a gun is a piece of data then are you allowed to share it and call it free speech? That is the argument that Defense Distributed has been making for the last three years,” Greenberg told Nightline.

“All the headlines are always about 3-D printed guns. But for Defense Distributed 3-D printing is almost just like a stand-in for this idea of any kind of digital tool that allows you to with just a download and a click create a gun component at home,” said Greenberg.

In a surprise turn this summer, the Trump administration reached a settlement with Wilson and Defense Distributed that would have allowed him to publish his gun blueprints online. He started publishing some of the files on July 27 but was forced again to remove them when a judge issued a temporary restraining order last week.

Wilson says that his aim is less about making weapons but instead giving people the tools to make a gun.

“Posting guns to the internet my goodness in these terms knowing the attorneys general will sue, nothing beats it," Wilson said.

At his company’s Texas headquarters, Wilson showed how his company has moved beyond the 3D printing of plastic guns into making metal guns using a computer-automated milling machine.

Wilson has developed a computer-automated milling machine, which is small enough to sit on a desk, and it costs just $2,000. It carves metal parts into the main component of different firearms like the AR-15 and glock.

“This will take you a couple of hours, and it doesn’t require your constant intercession,” Wilson explained, while the machine milled part of an AR-15.

It’s perfectly legal. Instead of publishing the computer data needed to operate the milling machine, Wilson ships it to his customers

Unlike the plastic versions that sometimes malfunctioned, experts say the metal versions can be similar to what you buy at a gun store.

Greenberg said the milling machine is “the most practical technology right now for homemade guns that circumvent all gun control laws and present a much more practical threat than 3-D printing.”

Weapons like these have been called “ghost guns,” as they have no serial number, can be assembled at home and are virtually untraceable.

“The term ghost gun refers to guns that really appear out of nowhere," Gardiner said. "We don’t have any register of who bought them, how they were sold."

But homemade guns are not new, and in many cases perfectly legal.

But critics say Wilson’s machine could make it easier for these firearms to get into the hands of people who aren’t legally allowed to own guns, like felons or the mentally ill.

“We have seen ghost guns used in shootings around America in the last several years,” said Gardiner.

Leticia Franco still remembers the day five years ago when a gunman opened fire in Santa Monica, killing four five people, including Franco’s father and sister.

“You feel so sad, like a part of you is taken away,” Franco told Nightline.

The shooter had used a ghost gun. An investigation revealed that he had a history of mental health issues, and previously had tried to buy a gun, but was denied.

The shooter instead ordered parts online, and assembled them into a gun himself.

This incident was not at all connected to Wilson, but Franco says she’s afraid of what Wilson’s doing.

“Providing this information is wrong. He’s also ethically responsible for what other people do with this information,” Franco said. “You provided these people with information that could potentially cause another tragedy.”

Wilson says he is aware of the potential dangers of making access to ghost guns easier.

“This isn’t just like playing games on your keyboard, right, on the internet? I’ve had customers arrested, right, in other states for owning guns when they shouldn’t have,” Wilson said. “But, again, [I’m advocating] that these are the necessary consequences of ensuring the people’s right to keep and bear arms.”

Wilson continued, “I reserve the right to change my mind about it, right? Maybe somehow it would deeply affect me, and I would choose to discontinue the operation ... I don’t know. I’m a full human being.”

For now, Wilson is stuck waiting to find out if the courts will allow him to upload those gun blueprints, despite the fact that other websites already have posted the exact files that Defense Distributed was hosting on its own site, according to Greenberg.

“The government has, essentially, failed, even though they tried this legal approach, they have failed to censor this information. It’s getting out there,” Greenberg explained.

In the meantime, Wilson is continuing business, shipping out those milling machines, of which he said he’s sold a thousand so far this year.

Despite all the legal battles ahead, Wilson says he refuses to back down.

“A gun is power and this is the essence of this project… I'm actually giving people the means to create a power for themselves and I'm zealous to do that. That's real for me” he said. “People can misuse it, but it's power all the same. It's a conversation beyond good and evil.”

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

NOAA forecasts less active Atlantic hurricane season due to El Nino, cooler water temperatures

NOAA(NEW YORK) -- There's a good chance that conditions in the sea and atmosphere will produce a less active Atlantic hurricane season this year, according to a new forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NOAA released its updated prediction Thursday, which was a change from the agency's forecast in late May that suggested normal to slightly above-normal activity during the period when hurricanes form in the Atlantic Ocean.

The likelihood of a below-normal Atlantic hurricane season is now at 60 percent, up from 25 percent in May. The chance of a near-normal season has dropped from 40 to 30 percent, while the likelihood of an above-normal season has plunged from 35 percent to 10 percent, according to NOAA.

NOAA's seasonal forecasters considered several factors when updating the outlook. There's now a 70 percent likelihood that El Nino, a warming of the equatorial Pacific Ocean that increases wind shear over the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, will form during the latter part of this year's hurricane season. Moreover, sea surface temperatures across the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea have continued to remain much cooler than average.

The combination of cooler temperatures, stronger wind shear, drier air and increased stability in the region where storms typically develop will further suppress hurricanes, according to NOAA.

But forecasters urged caution as the season enters its peak months, from mid-August to late October.

"There are still more storms to come –- the hurricane season is far from being over. We urge continued preparedness and vigilance," said Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.

For the entire Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, NOAA predicts there will be a total of nine to 13 named storms (39 mph or higher winds), of which four to seven will become hurricanes (74 mph or higher winds), including as many as two major hurricanes (111 mph or higher winds).

So far this season, there have been four named storms, including two hurricanes. An average six-month hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes, according to NOAA.

"Today’s updated outlook is a reminder that we are entering the height of hurricane season and everyone needs to know their true vulnerabilities to storms and storm surge," said Brock Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "Now is the time to know who issues evacuation orders in their community, heed the warnings, update your insurance and have a preparedness plan. Don’t let down your guard, late season storms are always a possibility, always keep your plans updated."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Aug092018

Hate, white supremacist propaganda at high level since Charlottesville

ADL(NEW YORK) -- Hate and white supremacist propaganda have been at a high level in the year since the streets of Charlottesville erupted in deadly violence, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

On Thursday, the ADL unveiled a first-of-its-kind interactive map documenting extremist and hate incidents in the United States.

The map includes anti-Semitic incidents, white supremacist rallies, extremist shootouts with police, extremist-related murders and extremist plots and attacks.

The ADL documented more than 3,000 incidents of extremism or anti-Semitism in the U.S. in 2017 and 2018. Most of the activity was concentrated in the eastern part of the country.

George Selim is the ADL's senior vice president and a former Department of Homeland Security official who led outreach programs to Muslim-American communities to try to prevent radical extremism.

Selim told ABC News that the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville last year was "very significant because it’s the first time that white supremacy really, since the civil rights movement, entered the public square."

On Aug. 11, 2017, white supremacists descended on Charlottesville for the next day's Unite the Right rally, the stated purpose of which was to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The debate over what to do with Confederate monuments had been brewing across the country, but Charlottesville became a touchpoint.

The weekend devolved into verbal and physical attacks between white supremacist groups and counter-protesters, turning deadly when a 20-year-old Ohio man allegedly accelerated his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and leaving 19 others injured, five critically.

Two Virginia State Police troopers were killed when their helicopter crashed outside of Charlottesville. The troopers, Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, were lending air support in response to the violence in Charlottesville.

James Alex Fields, the alleged driver in the incident, was indicted earlier this summer on federal hate crimes charges. Fields has pleaded not guilty to those charges and has also been charged under Virginia law with murder and other crimes. Fields is currently in jail awaiting trial.

In the months since Charlottesville, white supremacist propaganda has hit an even higher level, the ADL found. So far in 2018, the organization's Center on Extremism has tracked nearly 500 white supremacist propaganda incidents, more than in all of 2017.

Since Aug. 12, 2017, the ADL has tracked 54 public events attended by white supremacists, including a recent demonstration on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama and a flash demonstration at the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee.

The ADL also tracked an increase over the past year in white supremacist propaganda efforts, including anonymous visits to university campuses to put up flyers and the draping of banners from freeway overpasses.

"White supremacy in this country is not going away," said Selim. "We’ve seen them evolve their tactics and techniques online. We’ve seen them effectively use social media to launch and spread their ideas."

But the public outcry over Charlottesville also has resulted in some prominent white supremacists retreating from public view to the safer confines of the internet.

"The best of America comes out in times like this," Selim said. "We see the values and virtues of tolerance and pluralism and inclusion on display in times where we see the most significant levels of hatred and bigotry and anti-Semitism."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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