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Entries in Billboard (6)

Thursday
Apr182013

'Cowards' Billboard Lights Up Boston Skyline in Wake of Blasts

Wendy Maeda/The Boston Globe via Getty Images(BOSTON) -- Less than 10 miles from the finish line of the Boston Marathon, where three people were killed and more than 170 injured in dual blasts on Monday, lies a billboard with a one-word message: “Cowards.”

The billboard, located off the I-93 expressway that crosses the city, belongs to the local chapter of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) union. The chapter, Local 103, usually uses the billboard for union-related and community messages but that changed Tuesday morning, less than 24 hours after the two bombs exploded.

Since then, the electronic billboard had rotated every 10 seconds between the “Cowards” sign and another that reads, “Pray for Boston.”

None of the union’s 7,500 members were directly hurt in the explosions, according to a representative, but they have another connection.

The town where the chapter’s headquarters is located, Dorchester, Mass., is the same town where the blasts’ youngest victim, Martin Richard, and his family lived. Richard, 8, died while attending the marathon festivities with his mother, father and two siblings. Both his mother and younger sister sustained “serious” injuries in the attacks.

Local 103 plans to keep the billboard devoted to the Boston Marathon survivors but is working on incorporating new messages, the representative told ABC News.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jul162012

Pro-Pot Activists Put Pat Robertson on Marijuana Billboard

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(GRAND JUNCTION, Colo.) -- Pat Robertson is high, about 30 feet off the ground on a billboard in Colorado.

Proponents of legalizing marijuana in the state have used Robertson’s face on an electronic billboard along Interstate 70 in Grand Junction, Colo.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which is promoting a ballot initiative to legalize pot in Colorado, told ABC News it has paid $1,000 to place the ad, which promotes Robertson’s stated support for the initiative. Coloradans will vote on the measure in November.

Robertson is not working with the campaign and did not approve the ad before its placement. A spokesman for Robertson had no immediate comment on the ad.

At least twice, the evangelical leader has publicly offered his support for decriminalizing marijuana. In March 2012, he told The New York Times that he “absolutely” supports pot-legalization measures that will appear on November ballots in Colorado and Washington, but that he would not campaign for those initiatives.

“I really believe we should treat marijuana the way we treat beverage alcohol,” Robertson told the Times. “I’ve never used marijuana and I don’t intend to, but it’s just one of those things that [sic] I think. This war on drugs just hasn’t succeeded.”

The Colorado campaign did not attempt to contact Robertson before using his image, Mason Tvert, the campaign’s co-director, told ABC News.

“He had expressed his support for regulating marijuana like alcohol, and his specific support for the initiative, but he also mentioned he didn’t plan on campaigning himself for the measure, so we didn’t feel like we needed to bother him with that,” Tvert said.

When placing the billboard, the campaign considered its surroundings. In Western Colorado, the ad will reach conservative voters, who might be more interested in a conservative, 700 Club take on pot.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun242011

Judge Orders Abortion Billboard Removed, Man Refuses

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(ALAMOGORDO, N.M.) -- A judge has ordered the New Mexico man who put up a billboard suggesting his ex-girlfriend had had an abortion to remove the sign immediately.

This ruling was part of a protective order that Nani Lawrence sought after ex-boyfriend Greg Fultz, 35, put up the billboard along Alamogordo's main thoroughfare in May. Lawrence took him to court with a petition for domestic violence and charges of harassment and invasion of privacy.

The billboard shows Greg Fultz holding the outline of a baby with a playground in the background. The large text beside the photo reads, "This Would Have Been a Picture of My 2-Month Old Baby If The Mother Had Decided To NOT KILL Our Child!"

Even after the judge's order, Fultz said he had no plans to remove the sign. He told the Alamogordo Daily News, "I personally do not voluntarily plan on taking the sign down at any point in time. I am prepared to go to jail for something I believe in."

Fultz believes the order is a violation of his right to free speech.

The original billboard had two endorsements that have since been removed. The first was from the National Association for Needed Information, or NANI, an organization Fultz created for the study of anti-abortion issues. The acronym also happens to be his ex-girlfriend's first name.

An anti-abortion rights organization called Right to Life New Mexico had also originally endorsed Fultz's billboard and given its permission for Fultz to use its logo. But it pulled its endorsement when it learned that Fultz was unsure whether Lawrence had had an abortion or a miscarriage.

The billboard cost $1,300, which Fultz paid for with the help of donations. Fultz said the donations came from various individuals who heard about his plan, not from businesses or other anti-abortion rights groups.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jun072011

Abortion Billboard Could Land New Mexico Ex-Boyfriend in Jail

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(ALAMOGORDO, N.M.) -- A New Mexico man said Tuesday he will fight to keep up a controversial billboard that suggested his ex-girlfriend had an abortion.

The billboard has a photo of Greg Fultz holding the outline of a baby with a playground in the background. The large text beside the photo reads, "This Would Have Been a Picture Of My 2-Month Old Baby If The Mother Had Decided To NOT KILL Our Child!"

The sign is on White Sands Boulevard, the main thoroughfare in Alamogordo, N.M., and has been up since mid-May. Fultz's ex-girlfriend Nani Lawrence took him to court with a petition for domestic violence and charges of harassment and invasion of privacy.

Fultz, 35, claims that Lawrence was pregnant with his child during their six-month relationship last year. He admits that when the relationship ended, the baby was lost, but he does not know whether it was due to an abortion or a miscarriage. Fultz says that Lawrence would not tell him what happened.

Fultz maintains that the billboard was part of a greater message and was not aimed at his ex-girlfriend. He does admit, however, that the idea was "inspired" by events in his own life.

"My original intentions when I started this campaign were quite simple," Fultz said. "I just wanted to shed the light on pro-life issues and fathers' rights. I have had no closure over my own personal loss and that's where the billboard came into play."

Last week, Otero County Domestic Violence Court hearing commissioner Darrell Brantley recommended an order of protection for Lawrence and that the billboard be removed by 8:14 a.m. on June 17 on the grounds of harassment.

Judge James W. Counts is expected to approve these recommendations, but his office says they cannot comment on pending cases.

Fultz's attorney Todd Holmes said the court commissioner has stated he will recommend jail time if Fultz does not remove the billboard by June 17. They are planning on objecting to the ruling. Holmes argues that the lawsuit is a violation of his client's right to free speech.

Holmes cites the recent Supreme Court decision in favor of the Westboro Baptist Church, notorious for its anti-gay rallies and protesting at military funerals. The court ruled that the activities are protected by the First Amendment's right to free speech.

Lawrence could not be reached for comment, but her lawyer Ellen Jessen told the Alamogordo Daily News, "I think Fultz's right to free speech ends where Nani Lawrence's right to privacy begins....We have to balance one's right to free speech against one's right to free speech."

The original billboard had two endorsements that have since been removed. The first was from N.A.N.I., an organization Fultz created for pro-life issues that stands for National Association for Needed Information. The acronym also happens to be his ex-girlfriend's first name.

After a few weeks, Fultz removed N.A.N.I. due to the controversy distracting people from the intended message, he says.

A pro-life organization called Right to Life New Mexico had also originally endorsed Fultz's billboard and given their permission for him to use their logo. However, they pulled their endorsement when they discovered that Fultz was unsure whether Lawrence had an abortion or miscarriage.

The billboard cost $1,300, paid for by Fultz with the help of donations. Fultz says that the donations came from various individuals who heard about his plan, not from any businesses or other pro-life or organizations. The GEFNET endorsement on the billboard is from Fultz's own business.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb212011

Restaurant Shakes Up Indiana Town with Billboard Campaign

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(SOUTH BEND, Ind.) -- A northern Indiana restaurant is in hot water after displaying a controversial billboard campaign.

The South Bend-based restaurant said it did not intend for its billboards to be controversial, but rather, to be noticed. 

After numerous complaints, Hacienda took down billboards referring to the 1978 Jonestown cult massacre.  More than 900 people died when they drank punch laced with cyanide.

The Hacienda billboard featured the picture of a mixed drink that read, "We're like a cult with better Kool-Aid...To die for."

Hacienda executives have apologized for the campaign, saying the restaurant should not have used the billboards.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio 

Thursday
Oct142010

Billboard of Obama Sparks Controversy

Photo Courtesy - AFP/Grand Junction Sentinel(GRAND JUNCTION, Colorado) -- A billboard of President Obama in Grand Junction, Colorado is drawing a lot of criticism just weeks before midterm elections take place.

As AFP reports, the billboard depicts the president as an Islamist suicide bomber, a Mexican bandit, a cigar-chomping gangster and a homosexual, with the slogan "Vote DemocRAT" written across it.  Beneath these depictions of Obama are rats labeled to represent trial lawyers, the Internal Revenue Service, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Federal Reserve bank.

"It’s beyond distasteful, and it’s disrespectful of the commander-in-chief," said Martelle Daniels, chairwoman of the local Mesa County Democrats, calling it "clearly racist and homophobic." She added, "Certainly (it) is not designed for intelligent discourse at all."

Chuck Pabst, the local Republican Party chairman, told the Grand Junction Sentinel the billboard is in bad taste. "It’s reprehensible and disrespectful, and that’s not what any honorable person would put forth," Pabst said. "To ridicule somebody in this manner is juvenile."

Paul Snover, the artist responsible for the billboard, told the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel in an e-mail that he is "not allowed to say" who paid for the billboard.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio