SEARCH

Entries in Cape Cod (9)

Monday
Dec102012

Threatened Sea Turtles Flown to Florida

U.S. Coast Guard(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Thirty-five threatened sea turtles are safely recuperating in the Florida sunshine after they were found suffering from hypothermia in Cape Cod, Mass.

This year, a record 150 sea turtles have been rescued from the cold by the New England Aquarium Rescue Program, causing shelters in the region to run out of room.

The NOAA Fisheries Northeast Region Stranding Network teamed up with members of the Coast Guard, who flew on a C-130J aircraft from their home base in Elizabeth City, N.C., to Cape Cod, Mass., on Friday, where they picked up 35 of the turtles to transport to the sunshine state.

The turtles, which included 20 of the extremely rare Kemp’s Ridley species and 15 Loggerheads, were dropped off at five wildlife recovery centers in Florida, including SeaWorld in Orlando, where they will spend the winter season recovering, according to a news release from the Coast Guard.

It’s too soon to say when the animals will be able to return home, said Susan Flower, a spokeswoman for SeaWorld Orlando.  The theme park’s rehabilitation center is caring for 20 of the turtles.

“Our goal is always to return animals back to their natural environment,” she said.  “Really it just depends on how they’re doing.  We evaluate them, we have our team with them all the time.”

The SeaWorld facility has plenty of experience working with turtles, Flower said, and has also cared for rescued manatees, birds, dolphins and pilot whales, among other marine animals.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Aug312012

Shark Sightings Close Beaches Along Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Hemera/Thinkstock(CAPE COD, Mass.) -- Some beaches in Cape Cod, Mass., could be closed for the big Labor Day weekend after fishermen reported shark sightings hundreds of feet from the shoreline.

Beaches from the Orleans-Chatham town line south along Nauset Beach to Monomoy were closed Wednesday with no date for when they will reopen.

A family enjoying the day off the coast of Chatham last week came across a great white shark feasting on a gray seal, according to ABC News affiliate WCVB-TV in Boston.

Swimmers were warned to stay at least 300 feet away from seals.

Sharks have been more visible along Cape Cod this summer with numerous sightings.  Experts blame a drastic increase in the area’s seal population on which sharks feed.

“The elbow of the cape has these large, dense concentrations of gray seals now, and these white sharks go to the area to feed,” said Greg Skomal, a senior biologist at the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries.  “Because the seals are so abundant, now the white sharks are paying more attention.”

A man was attacked in July by what is believed to be a great white shark in the waters off Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass.  Police said Chris Myers was bit in both legs below the knees in possibly one single, crushing blow.

“I’ve been swimming at that beach since I was a little kid, and no one in recent memory has ever had a shark attack, let alone by a great white, which they are saying they think it was,” Myers told ABC's Good Morning America after the suspected shark attack. “Maybe people need to be a little more careful.”

Three weeks before that incident, a great white shark was spotted trailing a kayaker at Nauset Beach, about 25 miles south of Ballston Beach.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Aug012012

911 Calls of Cape Cod Shark Attack Victim Released

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The man who barely survived what is believed to be a great white shark attack in the waters off Cape Cod, Mass., said he worried about blood loss during the ordeal and that he's in no hurry to return to the water that he loves.

"It will take some gentle effort to get back in the water, but I hope one day," Chris Myers said on ABC's Good Morning America Wednesday from the Boston hospital where he is recovering.

Myers was swimming with his teenage son J.J. off the coast of Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass., around 3:30 p.m. Monday when he was apparently pulled under the water by a shark.  Police say Myers was bit in both legs below the knees in possibly one single, crushing blow.

The harrowing moments after the father of two emerged from the water can now be heard on the 911 calls received after the attack.

"A shark attack, he's bleeding, he's wounded.  His whole ankle's been bit, we need 911!" according to screams recorded during the calls.

Beachgoers had just watched helplessly as Myers was pulled under the water while he and his teenage son were bodysurfing.  Myers soon surfaced and screamed for help.

His son J.J. told GMA the attack seemed unreal.

"I heard him scream and turned around, and saw the back and the fin of the shark up out of water," he said.  "At that point it hit me when it was happening.  But at the same time, I thought that none of it was real.  It really seemed like a movie.  None of it seemed real until I was on the beach."

After the shark attacked, the father and son attempted to get back to land as quickly as possible.

"We really didn't have a lot of options," Chris Myers said.  "We were motivated, so we swam, hard.  I was thinking as I was swimming, my lungs were fine, my kick was fine, I was starting to feel kind of dizzy and wondering if I was losing blood.  My concern was that I wouldn't make it back to shore, but we were able to do it."

J.J. stayed by his side as emergency medical personnel raced his dad to the hospital.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Dr. Greg Skomal, Massachusetts' top shark scientist, says the attack most likely involved a great white.

"Given what we now about the other species in the area ... it's not likely to be a Blue or a Mako, or any of those other coastal sharks.  All this add up to the white shark being a candidate," he said.

A great white shark was also spotted trailing a kayaker three weeks ago at Nauset Beach, about 25 miles south of Monday's attack.  That's a total of four shark sightings this summer off the coast of Cape Cod.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jul312012

Massachusetts Man Hospitalized After Shark Attack Near Cape Cod

Comstock/Thinkstock(CAPE COD, Mass.) -- A man bitten by a shark Monday as he body-surfed with his teenage son off the coast of Ballston Beach near Cape Cod, Mass., is expected to live, officials said.

The attack happened around 3:30 p.m. when Chris Myers, a father of two, was pulled under the water by a shark.  Police say the shark bit Myers in both legs below the knees in possibly one single, crushing bite.

“They dragged him out and they had to carry him up here and they had to wrap it around his legs and he was bleeding through the gauzes,” a witness said.  “It was bad.  Both his legs were pretty bad.”

Myers was conscious and alert when authorities loaded him into an ambulance.

“It was pretty deep.  You could see muscle and bone,” Truro police officer Scott Holway said.  “It was like his flesh had been ripped.”

Several witnesses say they saw a shark fin appear before the attack.  They watched helplessly from the beach as Myers was pulled under the water by the shark.  Myers soon surfaced and screamed for help.

Witnesses were able to reach Myers after the attack and bring him safely to shore.  After Myers was raced to the hospital, authorities posted notices to swimmers but did not close the beach.  

Sharks have been more visible along Cape Cod this summer.  Experts say that’s because of a drastic increase of seals in the area.

“The elbow of the cape has these large, dense concentrations of gray seals now, and these white sharks go to the area to feed,” said Greg Skomal, a senior biologist at the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries.  “Because the seals are so abundant, now the white sharks are paying more attention.”

A great white shark was spotted trailing a kayaker three weeks ago at Nauset Beach, about 25 miles south of Monday’s attack.  That’s a total of four shark sightings this summer off the coast of Cape Cod.

“It’s a little alarming, I have to say,” a beachgoer said.  “With kids and boys that are pretty brave to go far out deep in the water, it’s a little alarming especially with the seals coming so close.”

video platform video management video solutions video player

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jun122012

Cape Cod's Elusive Black Bear Captured

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WELLFLEET, Mass.) -- Summer season on Cape Cod just started during Memorial Day weekend but the party is already over for the Cape's most famous, four-legged visitor. The 200-pound black bear who became the most well-known resident summering on Cape Cod has been captured and transported away, the Cape Cod Times reports.

Wellfleet, Mass., police confirmed to the paper that the bear was captured Monday night after a sighting earlier that day that reenergized their search. Officials also reportedly heightened their search after becoming concerned that tourists and locals were driving around in search of the bear on their own.

The bear first appeared over Memorial Day weekend and was spotted more than a dozen times. It is believed to have reached the Cape by swimming approximately 500 feet across the Cape Cod Canal.

Officials did not release details of the bear's capture or where it will be relocated.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun072012

Black Bear Summers on Cape Cod

FIle photo. Stockbyte/Thinkstock(CAPE COD, Mass.) -- A 200-pound black bear has become the most well-known resident summering on Cape Cod.

The bear first appeared over Memorial Day weekend and has now been spotted more than a dozen times. It is believed to have reached the Cape by swimming approximately 500 feet across the Cape Cod Canal.

Officials say research dating back to the 1700s indicates it is the first bear to appear on the Cape, and in what has become a prerequisite for all animals on the run it already has its own Twitter account with more than 1,300 followers.

“My affair with Cape Cod will not end #IAmHome,” @BearSwimmer tweeted Thursday.

Unfortunately for the bear, if wildlife officials have their way his vacation might be coming to an abrupt end. Now that the bear has reached the end of the Cape officials say they may try to immobilize it and move it to an area where there are other bears.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Feb042012

Hundreds of Dolphins Stranded on Cape Cod Beach

Tom Brakefield/Stockbyte/Thinkstock(CAPE COD, Mass.) -- Rescuers are struggling to save more than 100 dolphins that have beached themselves on the shores of Cape Cod, Mass., over the past two weeks in what could be the largest single-species stranding ever in the northeast.

The dolphins are washing up along the rocky shoreline in groups of as many of 10. At least 80 of them have already died.

“As of right now we’re looking at about 116 since the 12th of January. We’re not really sure why the number is continuing to climb,” Brian Sharp, a representative of the International Fund for Animal Welfare said.

One of the theories is that dolphins searching for food get caught in low tides, which push them to shore.

“When the water level drops, these animals can come ashore and become stranded,” Sharp said.

Hundreds of volunteers are trying to save the dolphins, and trying to prevent them from stranding again by releasing the rescued dolphins in deep water. Early signs indicate that their strategy is working.

The International Fund for Animal Welfare has already rescued 31 dolphins and outfitted them with satellite tags so they can track where they head next.

“Right now we’re at around 66 percent. We release them off of beaches where it gets deep quite quickly. From all these signs that we’ve seen from this event, the satellite tags look very good,” Sharp said.

At least one patient has a shot at a new life, he said.

“We had a pregnant female dolphin that we were able to release,” Sharp said. “We began doing our health exam and sure enough we discovered that the dolphin was pregnant with probably a third trimester calf.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Apr242011

Endangered Whale Species Grazing Off Coast of Cape Cod

ABC News(BOSTON) -- There are only a few hundred right whales in the North Atlantic, but in 2011 beachgoers in Cape Cod have been treated to a rare sight -- at least 100 of the endangered creatures have been counted in the area, grazing in mass just off the shoreline.

"The current must be piling the plankton up," said Charles "Stormy" Mayo of the Center for Coastal Studies. "(There's) a patch of food, of unbelievable richness that's just stretching right along this edge."

The unusually high abundance of plankton this year, numbering in the tens of thousands, is making for a delicious feast for the whales and a special sight for enthusiasts of this rare mammal.

But marine scientists are baffled why the supply of the tiny, shrimp-like creatures the whales subsist on, is so plentiful this year, so they're testing the water, using a hose rig that takes samples from different levels.

North Atlantic right whales, characterized by visible rough patches on their heads and distinctive snouts, can grow to be 50 feet long and weigh up to 90 tons.

Right whales got their name in the 19th century because they were the "right" whales to hunt -- slow swimming and peaceful. Slaughtered in the tens of thousands, only 100 remained in 1935 when the Convention for the Regulation of Whaling took effect.

While still listed as critically endangered, right whales are making a comeback -- making this rare sight special for spectators.

"They're so big and magnificent, you just see them and ... it gives you chills," said Deb Gustavson, a whale enthusiast. "They're amazing."

One hundred of the mammals have been counted in the area this past week, and researchers estimate there are at least double that number nearby.

In fact, there are so many right whales that the State of Massachusetts has warned boaters to steer clear of the animals. Federal law also dictates that boats must keep a 500-foot distance from the animals unless they have a research permit.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Dec272010

Blizzard Causes Severe Flooding, Evacuations and Fires in Cape Cod Coastal Town

Photo Courtesy- Getty Images(SCITUATE, Mass.) -- In the Cape Cod coastal town of Scituate, Mass., the East Coast blizzard has caused the ocean water level to rise, leading to severe flooding, evacuations, and fires.

Ocean water rushed in when a portion of the seawall collapsed on Scituate's Oceanside Drive. Flooding has reached about 100 yards of the town, and at some areas the water was eight feet deep.

Two homes on Seventh Avenue caught on fire and were destroyed. "We've had a couple of house fires we couldn't get to because the ocean has flooded in between the houses," said Department of Public Works Director Al Bangert. "Firemen went out with fire extinguishers in a rescue boat used more to rescue people in the water than fight fires. They couldn't stop the fires, but they rescued a man stranded in a nearby house."

Everyone inside the homes was safely evacuated. The National Guard is trying to rescue people from other houses that are under water. Lighthouse Point, which has about 80 houses on it, was evacuated.

The Red Cross has set up a shelter in Scituate High School where hundreds of evacuees from Lighthouse Point and Oceanside Drive are now staying.

Officials fear the flooding might cause the sewage system to back up.

"We have a sewer pump station that's not accessible to us right now, so were trying to get to that to see what's going on. It's a pretty substantial pumping system, and if it's not working, sewage backs up," Bangert told ABC News.

Scituate has suffered the worst from the storm among the coastal towns and faces the most danger from high flood waters, said Peter Judge, spokesman for the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, according to the Boston Globe.

"Scituate seems to be in the bull's eye,'' said Judge.

"The snow has stopped but we're still looking at some coastal flooding impact from the high tide from about 3 to 5 tonight. The winds have shifted so we don't expect the coastal flooding to be as severe as this morning's high tide cycle, but there may still be some impact," Scott MacLeod, a Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency spokesperson, told ABC News.

"With any kind of coastal flooding there's potential for impact to public utility, like sewer water and infrastructure, but until the flood waters have a chance to recede it's premature to say what steps will need to be taken," said MacLeod.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio