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Entries in christopher dorner (12)

Saturday
Feb162013

Christopher Dorner Autopsy: Cause of Death Was Single Gunshot to Head

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- Christopher Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer who went on a killing rampage appeared to have killed himself, authorities said.

The autopsy showed that Dorner's cause of death was a single gunshot to the head.

"The information that we have right now seems to indicate that the wound that took Dorner's life was self inflicted," said Capt. Kevin Lacy of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department in a press conference Friday.

Dorner, 33, was found dead after a standoff with police. The cabin where Dorner barricaded himself in went up in flames on Feb. 12.

Authorities said police made "numerous PA announcements identifying [Dorner] by name, asking him to surrender," before firing pyrotechnic tear gas inside the cabin Dorner had holed up in, causing the building to go up in flames.

"We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out," San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters on Feb. 13.

Dorner's charred remains were found inside the cabin. His body was positively identified during the autopsy through dental examination, the San Bernardino County Sheriff-Coroner's Office said in a written statement.

Authorities said that Dorner had been hiding out in an unoccupied cabin in Big Bear, Calif., for most of the manhunt, in close proximity to where they had set up command center in the area.

Karen and Jim Reynolds said they found Dorner in their cabin on Feb. 12. They said he may have been hiding out there since Feb. 8.

"He said four or five times that he didn't have a problem with us, he just wanted to clear his name," Jim Reynolds said. "He said, 'I don't have a problem with you, so I'm not going to hurt you.'"

Dorner tied the couple up, and put pillowcases over their heads before driving off in their purple Nissan. They managed to untie themselves once Dorner drove off and call the police, triggering the standoff at another cabin in the area that led to the building going up in flames.

Dorner outlined his anger at the Los Angeles Police Department for firing him in his 6,000 word "manifesto," and made threats against individuals he believed were responsible for ending his career with the police force five years ago.

Dorner is suspected of killing Monica Quan and her fiancé, who were found shot to death in a car in their apartment complex on Feb. 3. Quan was the daughter of former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who Dorner had targeted in his "manifesto."

Dorner is also suspected of killing Riverside, Calif., Police Officer Michael Crain.

San Bernardino Sheriff's Deputy Jeremiah MacKay, 35, a 15-year veteran and the father of two children, was killed in the Feb. 12 standoff.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb152013

Legal Loophole Could Hold Up $1M Christopher Dorner Reward

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- A legal loophole could prevent good Samaritans, instrumental in ending the manhunt for a fugitive ex-cop accused of killing four people, from claiming more than $1 million in reward money because Christopher Dorner died and was not captured.

Last weekend, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa pledged $1 million, sourced from private individuals, companies and unions, "for information that will lead to Mr. Dorner's capture."

The L.A. City Council followed up with its own promise of a $100,000 reward for information "leading to the identification, apprehension and conviction of Christopher Dorner."

But Dorner was never captured, apprehended or convicted.  Instead, he died following a standoff with police near Big Bear, Calif., when the cabin in which he was barricaded burned down with him inside.

The mayor's office has not yet determined if the reward could still be paid out given that Dorner died.

"At this time, no decision has been made on the reward," Villaraigosa's spokesman Peter Sanders told ABC News in an email.

So far, none of the privately sourced "funds have been deposited into the city's 'Special Reward Trust Fund,'" according to Frank T. Mateljan, a spokesman for the city attorney.

That still leaves an additional $100,000 that the city council could pay with municipal money, but there are legal questions there, as well.

"The reward is definitely still on the table," said Jessica Tarman, a spokeswoman for Councilman Daniel Zine.

The council ultimately decides how the reward will be distributed and who will get it.  If its members are feeling generous, they could interpret the language of the original offer to make sure a worthy recipient gets paid.

"Arguably, city law is broad enough to allow payment to persons who assisted in the 'identification, apprehension OR arrest and conviction' of a suspect," Metaljan said in an email.

If the city decides to honor the reward, there are still multiple steps before a claimant can be paid.

Anyone who thinks they are worthy must apply in writing.  That claim would then be reviewed by the Los Angeles Police Department's robbery and homicide division, and a recommendation would be made to the police commissioner.  The commissioner would tell the council to consider the claim, and the council would vote on it.

So far, no one has come forward to ask for the reward.  More than 1,000 leads were called in to a city hotline.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb142013

Charred Remains from Burned-Out Cabin Identified as Ex-Cop Christopher Dorner

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(BIG BEAR, Calif.) -- Christopher Dorner, the ex-Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a killing spree, is dead.

Authorities Thursday evening confirmed that remains found after a fiery standoff at a California mountain cabin Tuesday were, in fact, Dorner's.

"The charred human remains located in the burned-out cabin in Seven Oaks have been positively identified to be that of Christopher Dorner," the San Bernardino County Sheriff-Coroner's Office said Thursday in a written statement. "During the autopsy, positive identification was made through dental examination."

In a 6,000-word "manifesto" posted online, Dorner outlined his anger at the Los Angeles Police Department for firing him, and made threats against individuals he believed were responsible for ending his career with the police force five years ago. Dorner was fired after filing what the LAPD determined to be a false report accusing other cops of brutality.

Dorner is suspected of killing four people, including Monica Quan and her fiance, who were found shot to death Feb. 3. Quan was the daughter of former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who was mentioned as a target of Dorner's fury in the manifesto.

Dorner is also suspected in the shooting death of Riverside, Calif., Police Officer Michael Crain, whose funeral was Wednesday.

San Bernardino Sheriff's Deputy Jeremiah MacKay, 35, a 15-year veteran and the father of two children, was killed in Tuesday's shootout at the cabin.

A second San Bernardino County sheriff's officer had to undergo multiple surgeries after he was wounded in the cabin shootout, and other officers also were wounded in earlier alleged encounters with Dorner.

After Crain's death, police tracked Dorner to the Big Bear Lake area of Southern California, where his burning truck was found in the mountains late last week.

A couple with a cabin in the area were some of the last people to see Dorner before his final encounter with police. Their 911 call to police triggered a chase that concluded with the fiery standoff at the nearby cabin.

The couple, Karen and Jim Reynolds, said at a news conference Wednesday that their ordeal lasted a few minutes but seemed like hours.

The couple believes Dorner, 33, was holed up starting Friday in their unoccupied cabin in Big Bear, Calif., only steps from where police had set up a command center.

"He said four or five times that he didn't have a problem with us, he just wanted to clear his name," Jim Reynolds said. "He said, 'I don't have a problem with you, so I'm not going to hurt you.'"

Dorner tied their arms and put pillowcases over their heads before fleeing in their purple Nissan, the couple said.

Before he fled, the couple said Dorner told them that he had been watching them before he took over their cabin. Dorner told the couple he could tell they were "hard-working, good people."

"He had been watching us and saw me shoveling the snow Friday," Jim Reynolds said.

They say they may have left the cabin door unlocked and that could have been the reason Dorner was able to enter undetected.

Dorner remained "calm and meticulous" throughout the harrowing ordeal, the couple said.

The Reynoldses walked into their cabin around noon Tuesday when they came face-to-face with Dorner. There was no question in their minds who he was -- the suspected cop killer at the center of one of the largest manhunts in recent memory.

"I thought we were dead," Jim Reynolds said with a nervous chuckle.

The whole ordeal lasted about 15 minutes, but felt much longer for the couple.

"It felt like 15 hours with him," Karen Reynolds said.

Dorner, Reynolds said, first asked them to remain calm. Reynolds screamed and attempted to escape before Dorner caught up with her.

"I never even knew my reaction would be to run, but it was," she said.

Dorner tied them up and told them they were a means to his end, and wanted their car to escape.

"At first he kneeled down beside me and said, 'You're going to be quiet, right? Don't make a muss, don't try and get loose. Give me time,'" Jim Reynolds said.

The Reynoldses finally managed to break free and untie themselves after Dorner escaped with their car.

Earlier reports said that two female maids were taken hostage by Dorner.

After Dorner fled the Reynolds' cabin, he moved to another cabin in the area where he apparently engaged in the shootout with police before the building was consumed by flames.

"We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out," San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters Wednesday evening, although he noted that pyrotechnic canisters known as "burners" were fired into the cabin during a tear-gas assault in an effort to flush out Dorner.

The canisters generate high temperatures, he added.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb142013

Couple Recounts Being Held Hostage by Christopher Dorner

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- The California couple held hostage by Christopher Dorner, the ex-Los Angeles Police Department cop suspected of killing four people, said their ordeal lasted a few minutes but seemed like hours.

Karen and Jim Reynolds said at a news conference on Wednesday that they think Dorner, 33, was holed up in their unoccupied San Bernardino Mountains cabin since Friday, only steps from where cops had set up a command center.

"He said four or five times that he didn't have a problem with us, he just wanted to clear his name," Jim said.  "He said I don't have a problem with you, so I'm not going to hurt you."

Dorner tied their arms and put pillowcases over their heads before fleeing in their purple Nissan.

Before he fled, the couple said Dorner told them that he had been watching them before he took over their cabin.  Dorner told the couple he could tell they were "hard working, good people."

"He had been watching us and saw me shoveling the snow Friday," Jim said.

The two said they left the cabin door unlocked and that could have been the reason Dorner was able to enter undetected.

Dorner remained "calm and meticulous" throughout the harrowing ordeal, the couple said.

The Reynolds were some of the last people to see Dorner before what appears to be his final encounter with police.

Charred remains of the body believed to be Dorner were removed from another cabin high in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear, Calif., on Wednesday, the apparent site of Dorner's last stand.

The Reynolds walked into their cabin around noon Tuesday when they came face-to-face with Dorner.  There was no question in their minds who he was: the suspected cop killer at the center of one of the largest manhunts in recent memory.

"I thought we were dead," Jim said with a nervous chuckle.

The whole ordeal lasted about 15 minutes, but felt much longer for the couple.

"It felt like 15 hours with him," Karen said.

The Reynolds finally managed to break free and untie themselves after Dorner escaped with their car.  Jim called 911 on a cellphone he managed to stuff in a couch cushion without Dorner's knowing.

After Dorner fled the Reynolds' cabin, he moved to another cabin in the area where he apparently engaged in a shootout with police, killing one deputy and wounding another, before the building was consumed by flames.

"We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out," San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters Wednesday evening, although he noted that pyrotechnic canisters known as "burners" were fired into the cabin during a tear-gas assault in an effort to flush out Dorner.

The canisters generate high temperatures, he added.

While the actual cause of the fire is still unknown, the manhunt for Dorner has ceased and the Reynolds' story fills in much of what police didn't know about his whereabouts since he crashed his car and set it ablaze last week.

"The events that occurred [Tuesday] in the Big Bear area brought to close an extensive manhunt," McMahon said.

"I cannot absolutely, positively confirm it was him," he added.

The deceased deputy was identified as Det. Jeremiah MacKay, 35, a 15-year veteran and the father of two children: a daughter, 7, and son, 4 months old.

Dorner is also suspected of killing Monica Quan and her fiance, who were found shot to death on Feb. 3.  Quan was the daughter of former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who was mentioned as a target of Dorner's fury in his manifesto.

Dorner is also suspected in the shooting death of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.  His funeral was Wednesday.

In a 6,000-word "manifesto," Dorner outlined his anger at the Los Angeles Police Department for firing him, and made threats against individuals he believed were responsible for ending his career with the police force five years ago.  Dorner was fired after filing what the LAPD determined to be a false report accusing other cops of brutality.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb142013

Remains Not Yet ID'd, but Sheriff Considers Christopher Dorner Manhunt Over

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(BIG BEAR, Calif.) -- Though they have not yet identified burned remains found at the scene of Tuesday's fiery, armed standoff, San Bernardino, Calif., officials consider the manhunt over for Christopher Dorner, the fugitive ex-cop accused of going on a killing spree.

"The events that occurred yesterday in the Big Bear area brought to close an extensive manhunt," San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters Wednesday evening.

"I cannot absolutely, positively confirm it was him," he added.

However, McMahon noted the physical description of the suspect authorities pursued to a cabin at the standoff scene, as well as the suspect's behavior during the chase and standoff, matched those of the fugitive.

The charred remains of the body believed to be that of Dorner were removed from the cabin high in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear, Calif., the apparent site of the 33-year-old's last stand. Cornered inside the mountain cabin Tuesday, the suspect shot at cops, fatally wounding one deputy and injuring another before the building was consumed by flames.

"We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out," McMahon said Wednesday night, though he noted pyrotechnic canisters known as "burners" were fired into the cabin during a tear gas assault in an effort to flush out Dorner. The canisters generate high temperatures, he added.

The deputies wounded in the firefight were airlifted to a nearby hospital, where one died, police said.

The deceased deputy was identified Wednesday night as Det. Jeremiah MacKay, 35, a 15-year veteran and the father of two children -- a daughter, 7, and son, 4 months old.

"Our department is grieving from this event," McMahon said. "It is a terrible deal for all of us."

The wounded deputy, identified as Alex Collins, was undergoing multiple surgeries for his wounds at a hospital, McMahon said, but was expected to make a full recovery.

Before the final standoff, Dorner was apparently holed up in a snow-covered cabin in the California mountains just steps from where police had set up a command post and held press conferences during a five-day manhunt.

Since last Thursday, hundreds of cops scoured the mountains near Big Bear, a resort area in Southern California, using bloodhounds and thermal-imaging technology mounted to helicopters in the search for Dorner.

The former police officer and Navy marksman was being hunted as the suspect who allegedly killed a Monica Quan and her fiance, who were found shot to death Feb. 3. Last Thursday, he allegedly gunned down Riverside, California Michael Crain, who was laid to rest Wednesday. Crain's shooting and the discovery of an online "manifesto" pledging to kill dozens of cops, launched the dragnet.

Quan was the daughter of former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who was mentioned as a target of Dorner's fury in Dorner's screed declaring he was bent on revenge and pledged to kill dozens of LAPD cops and their family members.

The manhunt for Dorner, one of the biggest in recent memory, led police to follow clues across the West and into Mexico, but it ended just miles from where Dorner's trail went cold last week.

But it now appears that Dorner never left the area.

"There were rounds being fired," McMahon told reporters Wednesday evening about the last stand. "It was absolutely incredible. It was like being in a war zone."

McMahon called the deputies at the scene "heroes" for persisting in the face of fire from the cabin, noting, "The rounds kept coming but the deputies did not give up."

Some local television stations broadcast police scanner recordings of the firefight, the chatter punctuated by the sound of automatic gunfire.

"It was horrifying to listen to that firefight and to hear those words," said LAPD spokesman Lt. Andrew Neiman. "'Officer down' is the most gut-wrenching experience that you can have as a police officer."

Over the course of the next five hours, heavily armed SWAT teams with tank-like vehicles surrounded the cabin, even firing tear gas inside, but never entered the building.

Cops said they heard a single gunshot go off from inside the cabin just as they began to see smoke and fire. Later they heard the sound of more gunshots, the sound of ammunition being ignited by the heat of the blaze, law enforcement officials said.

In the 6,000-word "manifesto," Dorner outlined his anger at the Los Angeles Police Department for firing him, and made threats against individuals he believed were responsible for ending his career with the police force five years ago. Dorner's grievance with police goes back five years, when he was fired for filing what the LAPD determined to be a false report accusing other cops of brutality.

The LAPD assigned 50 protection details to guard officers and their families who were deemed possible targets. The LAPD said Wednesday it would maintain the details until Dorner's body was positively identified.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb132013

Christopher Dorner Manhunt: Charred Human Remains Found in Cabin

ABC News(LOS ANGELES) -- Investigators have located charred human remains in the burned-out California cabin where they believe suspected cop killer and ex-Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner was holed up as the structure burned to the ground, police said.

The human remains were found within the debris of the burned cabin and identification will be attempted through forensic means, the San Bernardino County Sheriff-Coroner Department said in a press release early Wednesday morning.

Dorner barricaded himself in the cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear Tuesday afternoon after engaging in a gunfight with police, killing one officer and injuring another, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said.

Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, which is the lead agency in the action, said on Tuesday night that investigators would remain at the site all night.

When Bachman was asked if police thought Dorner was still in the burning cabin, she said, "Right....We believe that the person that barricaded himself inside the cabin engaged in gunfire with our deputies and other law enforcement officers is still inside there, even though the building burned."

Bachman spoke shortly after the Los Angeles Police Department denied earlier reports that a body was found in the cabin, contradicting what law enforcement sources told ABC News and other news organizations.

Police around the cabin told ABC News they saw Dorner enter but never leave the building as it was consumed by flames, creating a billowing column of black smoke seen for miles.

A press conference is scheduled for later Wednesday in San Bernardino.

The sheriff's deputy killed during the shootout with Dorner Tuesday afternoon is believed to be his fourth victim after killing an LAPD officer and two other people this month, including the daughter of a former police captain.

Police received a 911 call at 12:20 p.m. PT that a suspect resembling Dorner had broken into a home in the Big Bear area, taken two hostages and stolen a car.

The two hostages, who were tied up by Dorner but later escaped, were evaluated by paramedics and were determined to be uninjured.

Officials say Dorner crashed the stolen vehicle and fled on foot to the cabin where he barricaded himself and exchanged fire with deputies from the San Bernardino Sheriff's Office and state Fish and Game officers.

The deputy who was wounded in the firefight with Dorner Tuesday afternoon is expected to survive, police said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb122013

Cops Believe Christopher Dorner Never Left Cabin as It Burned

ABC News(LOS ANGELES) -- Investigators have not been able to enter the still smoldering remains of the California mountain cabin where they believe fugitive ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner barricaded himself Tuesday, but they believe he was still there as the structure burned to the ground, police said Tuesday night.

Cindy Bachman, spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, which is the lead agency in the action, said the cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear was still too hot and dangerous for investigators to enter.

She said, however, that a suspect they believe is Dorner entered the cabin and did not come out as it burned to the ground.

"We believe that he was still inside the cabin [as it burned down], yes," Bachman said.

Bachman spoke shortly after the Los Angeles Police Department denied reports that a body was removed from the cabin, contradicting what law enforcement sources told ABC News and other news organizations.

Police around the cabin said they saw Dorner enter, but never leave the building as it was consumed by flames, creating a billowing column of black smoke seen for miles. The smoke was first seen coming from the cabin shortly before 4:30 p.m. PT.

Dorner, a former Navy marksman who is wanted for allegedly murdering a police officer and suspected in the deaths of two other people earlier this month, had reportedly engaged in a gunfight Tuesday with two San Bernardino County Sheriff's deputies who had pursued him.

The two were airlifted to a nearby hospital, where one died, police said.

Dozens of local, state and federal authorities were at the scene in the San Bernardino Mountains. Dorner had sworn to kill police and their family members in his so-called "manifesto" discovered online last week.

The search for Dorner, one of the largest manhunts in recent memory, culminated in a call to police Tuesday afternoon that a suspect resembling Dorner had broken into a nearby home, taken hostages and stolen a car.

Police said the former cop, who was believed to be heavily armed and extremely dangerous, allegedly took two women hostage before stealing a car just after noon local time Tuesday, police said.

The two hostages, who were tied up by Dorner but later escaped, were evaluated by paramedics and were determined to be uninjured.

Officials say Dorner crashed the stolen vehicle and fled on foot to the cabin where he barricaded himself and exchanged fire with deputies from the San Bernardino Sheriff's Office and state Fish and Game officers.

Police sealed all roads going into the area and imposed a no-fly zone above the cabin, nestled in a wooded area that has received several inches of snow in recent days.

Four Big Bear area schools were briefly placed on lockdown.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department stopped all traffic leaving the area and thoroughly searched vehicles, as SWAT team and tactical units could be seen driving toward the cabin, their sirens blaring.

If Dorner is still on the run, he faces capital murder charges that involve the killing of Riverside police officer Michael Crain, who was gunned down in an ambush last Thursday.  The charges do not involve the slayings of Monica Quan and her fiance, who were found shot to death Feb. 3. Quan was the daughter of former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who was mentioned as a target of Dorner's fury in his manifesto, which he posted on his Facebook page.

In the 6,000 word screed, Dorner outlined his anger at the Los Angeles Police Department for firing him, and threatened individuals he believed were responsible for ending his career with the police force five years ago. His termination reportedly came after an LAPD investigation determined Dorner made a false report accusing other cops of brutality.

The LAPD had assigned 50 protection details to guard officers and their families who were deemed possible targets while Dorner remained at large.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb112013

Possible Sighting of Christopher Dorner Leads to Store Evacuation

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- A Northridge, Calif., home improvement store was evacuated Sunday night because of a possible sighting of suspected cop-killer Christopher Dorner, just hours after police announced a $1 million reward for information leading to his arrest.

As helicopters hovered overhead and a command center was established, police searched the Lowe's store and eventually told shoppers they could leave but could not take their cars out of the parking lot.  An "all clear" was called at around 8:30 p.m. local time.

Los Angeles Police Department spokesman Gus Villanueva said the major response to the possible sighting was a precaution, but couldn't say whether Dorner was in the area.

The announcement of the $1 million reward on Sunday came as authorities in Big Bear, Calif., scaled back their search for Dorner, the disgruntled ex-cop who is suspected in three revenge killings.

"This is the largest local reward ever offered, to our knowledge," Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said at a news conference on Sunday.  "This is an act of domestic terrorism.  This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public.  His actions cannot go unanswered."

The money for the reward was pooled by businesses, government, local law enforcement leaders and individual donors, Beck said.

The reward comes on the fourth day of a manhunt for Dorner, who has left Southern California on edge after he allegedly went on a killing spree last week to avenge his firing from the police force.  Dorner outlined his grievances in a 6,000-word so-called "manifesto" and said he will keep killing until the truth is known about his case.

Dorner's threats have prompted the LAPD to provide more than 50 law enforcement families with security and surveillance detail, Beck said.

Authorities are chasing leads, however they declined to say where in order to not impede the investigation.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Feb102013

Christopher Dorner Manhunt: $1 Million Reward Offered For Capture of Fugitive Ex-Cop

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A $1 million reward was offered Sunday for information leading to the arrest of Christopher Dorner, as authorities in Big Bear, Calif., scaled back their search for the disgruntled ex-cop, who is suspected in three revenge killings.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said it is the largest local reward ever offered.

Although there have been no reported sightings of Dorner in the Big Bear area, authorities have zeroed in on the area after finding his burned out truck.

On day four of the manhunt, a scaled-back force of 25 officers and one helicopter spread out in the mountainous area, located 80 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles.

Officers have been going door-to-door at some 600 cabins, looking for signs of the fugitive ex-cop.

No new evidence has been found, authorites said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Feb102013

Christopher Dorner Manhunt: LAPD Reopens Case That Led to Suspected Cop-Killer's Firing

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- The Los Angeles Police Department announced Saturday it will reopen the case of the firing of Christopher Dorner, but said the decision was not made to "appease" the fugitive former cop suspected of killing three people.

Dorner, a fired and disgruntled former Los Angeles police officer, said in the so-called "manifesto" he released that he was targeting LAPD officials and their families and will keep killing until the truth is known about his case.

"I have no doubt that the law enforcement community will bring to an end the reign of terror perpetrated on our region by Christopher Jordan Dorner and he will be held accountable for his evil actions," LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said in a statement released Saturday night.

He spoke of the "tremendous strides" the LAPD has made in regaining public trust after numerous scandals, but added: "I am aware of the ghosts of the LAPD's past and one of my biggest concerns is that they will be resurrected by Dorner's allegations of racism within the Department."

To do that, he said, a full re-investigation of the case that led to Dorner's firing is necessary.

"I feel we need to also publicly address Dorner's allegations regarding his termination of employment, and to do so I have directed our Professionals Standards Bureau and my Special Assistant for Constitutional Policing to completely review the Dorner complaint of 2007, to include a re-examination of all evidence and a re-interview of witnesses," he said. "We will also investigate any allegations made in his manifesto which were not included in his original complaint.

"I do this not to appease a murderer. I do it to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all the things we do."

As police searched for Dorner Saturday in the San Bernardino Mountains, sources told ABC News that investigators found two AR-15 assault rifles in the burned-out truck Dorner abandoned.

The truck had a broken axle, which may be the reason he decided to set fire to it, the police sources said.

A man identifying himself as Dorner taunted the father of Monica Quan four days after the former LAPD officer allegedly killed her and just 11 hours after he allegedly killed a police officer in Riverside, Calif., according to court documents obtained by ABC News

A man claiming to be Dorner called Randall Quan and told him that that he "should have done a better job of protecting his daughter," according to the documents.

In his 6,000-word "manifesto," Dorner named Randal Quan, a retired LAPD captain and attorney who represented him before a police review board that led to Dorner's dismissal from the force.

"I never had an opportunity to have a family of my own, I'm terminating yours," Dorner wrote, and directed Quan and other officials to "[l]ook your wives/husbands and surviving children directly in the face and tell them the truth as to why your children are dead."

Monica Quan and her fiancé Keith Lawrence were gunned down last Sunday in their car in the parking lot of their Irvine, Calif., condominium complex. Both were struck with multiple gunshot wounds.

The call, according to court records, was traced to Vancouver, Wash., but law enforcement officials do not believe Dorner was there at the time at the call.

Dorner is believed to have made the call early Thursday afternoon, less than half a day after he is suspected of killing a police officer and wounding two others early that morning, sparking an unprecedented man hunt involving more than a thousand police officers and federal agents spanning hundreds of miles.

Saturday the search continued on Bear Mountain, Dorner's last suspected location. His burned-out truck was discovered there Thursday at 8:30 a.m., four hours before the call to Quan.

Law enforcement officials tell ABC News some evidence suggests the truck may have been torched and abandoned after it experienced mechanical difficulties.

Search teams comprised of local, state and federal law enforcement officials are combing the mountain on foot, using search dogs and helicopters equipped with infrared cameras.

Teams are going door to door to search nearly 400 homes in the area.

Rugged terrain and a snow storm have hampered efforts to hunt for Dorner, but officials say they have no reason to believe Dorner has left the Big Bear area, even though he has not been seen there.

Dorner, law enforcement sources say, could pose a threat to aviation security. A bulletin issued by the Transportation Security Administration urges aircraft and airport owners and operators to use "an increased level of awareness concerning any suspicious activity during the coming days."

Dorner, the bulletin says, is believed to have received "flight training during his time in the Navy, but the extent of his potential flying skills is unknown.

The "be on the lookout" alert tells operators to secure unattended aircraft and report persons "masquerading as pilots, security personnel, emergency medical technicians, or other personnel using uniforms and/or vehicles as methods to gain access to aviation facilities or aircraft."

Dorner is believed to have had access to military and police uniforms.

Saturday, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa made a direct appeal to Dorner, telling ABC News, "Mr. Dorner, if you're watching, turn yourself in. You've caused a great deal of death and destruction. It's time that you turn yourself in."

Police described Dorner as black, 6-feet tall and weighing 270 pounds. He has black hair and brown eyes.

 

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