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Entries in commander (4)

Saturday
Jun082013

Commander of US Army Forces in Japan Suspended

http://www.usarj.army.mil/cmdstaffs/CG2.jpg(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Army suspended Maj. Gen. Michael Harrison, commander of the U.S. Army Forces in Japan from his duties for alleged failure to report or investigate at least one allegation of sexual assault.

The sexual abuse case in question took place within the last 12 months, says USA Today. While Maj. Gen. Harrison was relieved of his duties by Gen. Raymond Odierno, the Army chief of staff, he is not himself accused of any form of sexual misconduct.

The U.S. Department of Defense announced in a press release that Maj. Gen. James C. Boozer, formerly the deputy commanding general of the United States Army in Europe, will serve as the interim commander in Japan until the Army's investigation is complete.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Dec202011

Obama Welcomes Home US Commander in Iraq

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Marking the end of the nearly nine-year war, President Obama Tuesday welcomed home the top commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, Gen. Lloyd Austin, and witnessed the return of the command flag that flew over Baghdad.

“It is great to be back in the United States of America,” Austin said in an understated ceremony at Joint Base Andrews. “We have honored our commitment  and our military-led mission has come to a successful conclusion, and today I am proud to safely return our colors to their rightful place, the United States of America.”

While the president did not deliver formal remarks, both Obama and Vice President Joe Biden greeted Austin and his top command staff on the tarmac.

With his commander-in-chief sitting close by, Austin praised the troops who served in Iraq and highlighted their successes. “I could not be more proud of our men and women in uniform who are unquestionably the pre-eminent military force in the world,” he said. “What our troops achieved in Iraq over the course of nearly nine years is truly remarkable. Together with our coalition partners and core of dedicated civilians, they removed a brutal dictator and gave the Iraqi people their freedom.”

Tuesday’s event came only two days after the last U.S. troops withdrew from Iraq. “Today, we bring home the colors to United States soil, at the same time we embrace many of our own back into the fold just in time for the holidays,” chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey said. “Welcome home.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Aug302011

Naval Commander Convicted of 9/11 Fraud

Photos.com/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A decorated retired naval officer who was honored for his heroic actions during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon was found guilty Monday of defrauding a 9/11 victims’ compensation fund.

Cmdr. Charles Coughlin of Severna Park, Maryland was found guilty of making a false claim in order to collect more than $300,000 from the fund.  Coughlin claimed he was injured by falling debris when he raced back into the Pentagon to help others.  He was awarded the Purple Heart and the Meritorious Service Medal for his actions and the injuries he suffered that day.

Soon after, the 52-year-old Coughlin claimed he suffered constant pain in his neck, along with headaches, weakness and numbness in his left hand.  He also claimed he could no longer play basketball, work on homeowner projects or run long distance races.

Prosecutors say Coughlin ran in the New York City Marathon two months after the terrorist attack.  They also presented photographs of Coughlin playing lacrosse.

The verdict carries a maximum sentence of up to 15 years in prison, but prosecutors are expected to seek a sentence of three to four years when Coughlin is sentenced on Nov. 21.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Sunday
May292011

Blue Angels Commander Steps Down After Leading Risky Maneuver

Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images(SAN DIEGO) -- The leader of the Navy's celebrated Blue Angels flight team is stepping down after admitting to leading jets in an "unacceptably" low-altitude stunt.

Navy Cmdr. Dave Koss volunteered to be relieved of his duties after admitting days following a performance at Lynchburg Regional Air Show on May 22, that the movement he carried out "had an unacceptably low minimum altitude" and was not in accordance with airborne standards, according to a statement from the Naval Air Forces.

"This maneuver, combined with other instances of not meeting the airborne standard that makes the Blue Angels the exceptional organization that it is, led to my decision to step down," Koss said in the statement.

Even though the maneuver went off without injuries and all members of the Blue Angels Team landed safely, after a safety review several of the team's shows were cancelled, including a midweek show at the U.S. Naval Academy and performances scheduled over the Memorial Day Weekend.

This Blue Angels also canceled scheduled performances at the Rockford Airfest June 4 and 5, and at the Evansville Freedom Festival Air Show June 11 and 12.

In the meantime, according to the statement, the Blue Angels were to stay in Pensacola, Fla., for more training and air show demonstration practice.

Safety issues are not new for the esteemed flying team. Thousands watched on April 2007 when a Blue Angels' jet crashed during a South Carolina performance. The Beaufort, S.C., crash killed one pilot and injured other members of the team.

In 2004, Lt. Ted Steelman suffered minor injuries after being ejected when his aircraft struck water one mile off Perdido Key in Florida. The accident was the result of engine and structural damage.

Koss will be replaced by Capt. Greg McWherter, who was the previous Blue Angels' commanding officer, for the duration of the season.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio