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Entries in daylight saving time (3)

Sunday
Mar102013

Daylight Saving Time 2013: 3 Things You Didn't Know

Zoonar/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Daylight saving time started at 2 a.m. on Sunday morning and will run through Nov. 3. So while you lost an hour during the switch, you gained an extra hour of daylight. Here are three things you might not know about daylight saving time:

Daylight Saving Time Was Conceived as a Way to Save Energy

In the U.S., daylight saving time was first used during World War I to conserve resources. It was reinstated again during World War II until Sept. 1945. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 created a standardized system to observe daylight saving time.

The Department of Energy studied the energy savings in 2008. They found that during daylight saving time, U.S. electricity use decreased by 0.5 percent per day, which added up to 1.3 billion kilowatt-hours, enough to power about 122,000 average U.S. homes for a year.

Daylight Saving Time Begins in March and Ends in November

From World War II until recently, the seven-month period of daylight saving time in the U.S. ran from April until mid-October.

But in 2007, Congress adjusted daylight saving time to begin three weeks earlier and end one week later, a move they hoped would help save energy. At the time, they pointed to the fact that longer daylight in the evening hours reduced the need to turn on lights in homes at night.

Daylight Saving Time Helps Prevent Traffic Injuries and Reduces Crime

The extra hour of daylight has been credited for preventing traffic injuries and reducing crime as "people travel to and from school and work and complete errands during the daylight," and "more people are out conducting their affairs during the daylight rather than at night, when more crime occurs," according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Mar092013

Daylight Saving Time: Switch Your Clocks Forward

Zoonar/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's time to spring forward this weekend. Don't forget to set your clock ahead one hour before going to bed Saturday as daylight saving time will begin 2 a.m. Sunday.

The switch will cost you an hour of sleep but you'll gain an extra hour of daylight in the evenings.

Since 2007, daylight saving time in the U.S. has run from the second Sunday of March to the first Sunday of November.

All U.S. states except Hawaii and most of Arizona observe daylight saving time.

The U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Northern Marianas and the Virgin Islands do not move their clocks forward.

Daylight saving time was conceived as a way to save energy.

However, the switch can take its toll on your body and you may be tempted to drink an extra cup or two of coffee.

Nutritionist Ashley Koff told ABC News Radio that you're better off with a good breakfast.

"Energy comes from food. It comes from nutrient balance of carbohydrate, protein and healthy fats," she said. "Carbohydrates like our waffle and some healthy fat and protein from our peanut butter."

Dr. Raghu Upender, medical director of the Vanderbilt Sleep Disorders Center, told ABC News that it's best to try to stick to your normal weekday sleep schedule during the "spring forward" weekend.

"People tend to delay their sleep during the weekend and tend to go into Monday with less sleep. This can be exaggerated on the Monday following the change to daylight saving time," Upender said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Nov052011

Remember to set your Clocks Back

Medioimages/Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Yes it's that time again. Remember to set your clocks back one hour when you go to bed Saturday night because Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday.

The seven-month period of daylight saving time is mandated by governments which began implementing the time switch during World Wars I and II to save energy and resources for the war effort. From World War II until recently, daylight saving in the U.S. ran from April until mid-October.

But in 2007, Congress adjusted saving time to begin three weeks earlier and end one week later, a move they hoped would help save energy. At the time, they pointed to the fact that longer daylight in the evening hours reduced people's need to turn on lights in their homes at night.

Critics of the policy questioned the government's decision, wondering whether people would simply turn on as many lights in the morning hours instead. In response, the Department of Energy studied the energy savings in 2008. They found that during that period, U.S. electricity use decreased by 0.5 percent per day, which added up to 1.3 billion kilowatt-hours, enough to power about 122,000 average U.S. homes for a year.

Now, as daylight saving time comes to its November close, energy use will rise again as the sun sets earlier in the evening.

In the early morning hours of Sunday, Nov. 6, the clocks will be set back an hour, from 2 a.m. to 1 a.m. For an individual who goes to bed at 10 p.m. on Saturday night and awakens eight hours later, they will wake up at 5 a.m. on Sunday morning. It will still be dark, of course, but the sun will come earlier than normal, at 6:30 a.m.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio