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Entries in Doping (14)

Saturday
Jan192013

Lance Armstrong Interview: Former Teammate Tyler Hamilton Said Cyclist Showed 'Genuine Emotion'

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- While critics derailed Lance Armstrong for coming off as detached in the two-part interview with Oprah Winfrey that aired Thursday and Friday nights, former teammate and friend, Tyler Hamilton, told Good Morning America Saturday that he felt Armstrong was displaying "genuine emotion."

"I've never seen Lance shed a tear until last night. Before I even heard one word from him Thursday night, I could tell he was a broken man," Hamilton said.

Armstrong's contrition turned tearful Friday when he revealed to Oprah Winfrey how difficult it was to betray his family -- particularly his 13-year-old son -- who stood up for the fallen cycling star as rumors swirled that he was taking banned drugs.

Armstrong, 41, choked up when he recounted what he told his son, Luke, in the wake of the scandal. "When this all really started, I saw my son defending me and saying that's not true…" Armstrong told Winfrey, "I told Luke. I said, 'Don't defend me anymore.'"

Armstrong's interview with Winfrey drew millions of viewers.

It was the first time Armstrong admitted using performance-enhancing drugs and oxygen-boosting blood transfusions to help him win the Tour de France.

"I view this situation as one big lie that I repeated a lot of times," Armstrong said. "I know the truth. The truth isn't what was out there. The truth isn't what I said.

"I'm a flawed character, as I well know," Armstrong added. "All the fault and all the blame here falls on me."

However, Hamilton said any hope for Armstrong's redemption would come if he came clean about others who were part of the doping scandal.

"The question now is where he goes from this, his actions moving forward. He needs to name names," Hamilton said.

Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in October 2012, after a report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency found that he and 11 of his teammates orchestrated "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen."

Despite the admissions of his teammates that they had doped with Armstrong and seen him complete blood transfusions for races, Armstrong condemned the report and denied that he had ever cheated.

As sponsors including Nike began to pull support of Armstrong following the report, Armstrong's carefully-built image began to crumble. He stepped down from Livestrong, the charity he started to help cancer patients after he survived testicular cancer.

"It was a mythic perfect story and it wasn't true," Armstrong said of his fairytale story of overcoming testicular cancer to become the most celebrated cyclist in history.

In the interview, Armstrong explained his competition "cocktail" of EPO, blood transfusions and testosterone that he used throughout his career. He also said he had previously used cortisone.

Armstrong refused to give Winfrey the details of when, where and with whom he doped during seven winning Tours de France between 1999 and 2005, which was the last year he said he doped. Armstrong specifically denied using banned substances when he placed third in 2009 and entered the tour again in 2010.

Investigators familiar with Armstrong's case, however, told ABC News that Armstrong did not come completely clean to Winfrey, and say they believe he doped in 2009.

They said that Armstrong's blood values at the 2009 race showed clear blood manipulation consistent with two transfusions. Armstrong's red blood cell count suddenly went up at these points, even though the number of baby red blood cells did not.

Investigators said that was proof that he received a transfusion of mature red blood cells.

If Armstrong lied about the 2009 race, it could be to protect himself criminally, investigators said.

Federal authorities looking to prosecute criminal cases will look back at the "last overt act" in which the crime was committed, they explained. If Armstrong doped in 2005 but not 2009, the statute of limitations may have expired on potential criminal activity.

The sources noted that there is no evidence right now that a criminal investigation will be reopened. Armstrong is facing at least three civil suits.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan182013

Lance Armstrong Confesses to Doping

Harpo Studios. Inc(NEW YORK) -- Lance Armstrong, formerly cycling's most decorated champion and considered one of America's greatest athletes, confessed to cheating for at least a decade, admitting on Thursday that he owed all seven of his Tour de France titles and the millions of dollars in endorsements that followed to his use of illicit performance-enhancing drugs.

After years of denying that he had taken banned drugs and received oxygen-boosting blood transfusions, and attacking his teammates and competitors who attempted to expose him, Armstrong came clean with Oprah Winfrey in an exclusive interview, admitting to using banned substances for years.

"I view this situation as one big lie that I repeated a lot of times," he said. "I know the truth. The truth isn't what was out there. The truth isn't what I said.

"I'm a flawed character, as I well know," Armstrong added. "All the fault and all the blame here falls on me."

In October, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency issued a report in which 11 former Armstrong teammates exposed the system with which they and Armstrong received drugs with the knowledge of their coaches and help of team physicians.

The U.S. Postal Service Cycling Team "ran the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen," USADA said in its report.

As a result of USADA's findings, Armstrong was stripped of his Tour de France titles. Soon, longtime sponsors including Nike began to abandon him, too.

Armstrong said he was driven to cheat by a "ruthless desire to win."

He told Winfrey that his competition "cocktail" consisted of EPO, blood transfusions and testosterone, and that he had previously used cortisone. He would not, however, give Winfrey the details of when, where and with whom he doped during seven winning Tours de France between 1999 and 2005.

He said he stopped doping following his 2005 Tour de France victory and did not use banned substances when he placed third in 2009 and entered the tour again in 2010.

"It was a mythic perfect story and it wasn't true," Armstrong said of his fairytale story of overcoming testicular cancer to become the most celebrated cyclist in history.

Armstrong would not name other members of his team who doped, but admitted that as the team's captain he set an example. He admitted he was "a bully" but said there "there was a never a directive" from him that his teammates had to use banned substances.

"At the time it did not feel wrong?" Winfrey asked.

"No," Armstrong said. "Scary."

"Did you feel bad about it?" she asked again.

"No," he said.

Armstrong said he thought taking the drugs was similar to filling his tires with air and bottle with water. He never thought of his actions as cheating, but "leveling the playing field" in a sport rife with doping.

 Armstrong passed more than 500 drug tests during his career. In some cases, however, he was found to have used substances, including EPO, years after he retired when new tests could find previously untraceable drugs.

However, he denied a claim by former teammate Floyd Landis that he organized a cover-up and paid off officials when, in 2001, he allegedly failed a test prior to the Tour de Suisse.

Armstrong used his wealth and influence to go after any of his teammates or crew members who attempted to expose him. He sued a team masseuse and as well former teammate Frankie Andreu and his wife, Betsy Andreu, who claimed to have overheard Armstrong telling a doctor that he used multiple banned substances.

Armstrong said he believed he would not have been caught had he not come out of retirement in 2008, just after former teammate Floyd Landis was caught doping and stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title.

He said, however, that his "fate was sealed" when George Hincapie, the only teammate with whom he competed in all seven winning Tours de France, was forced to testify against him to USADA.

Minutes after the interview concluded, Livestrong -- the cancer foundation that he founded -- released a statement expressing disappointment in their former leader.

"We at the LIVESTRONG Foundation are disappointed by the news that Lance Armstrong misled people during and after his cycling career, including us.  Earlier this week, Lance apologized to our staff and we accepted his apology in order to move on and chart a strong, independent course," the statement read.

"Our success has never been based on one person -- it's based on the patients and survivors we serve every day, who approach a cancer diagnosis with hope, courage and perseverance," it continued.

Also on Thursday, before the Winfrey interview aired, the International Olympic Committee stripped Armstrong of his 2000 Olympic bronze medal.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jan152013

Oprah Winfrey Describes Intense Lance Armstrong Interview

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Oprah Winfrey said on Tuesday that Lance Armstrong came well prepared for their highly anticipated interview, although he "did not come clean in the manner [she] expected."

Winfrey, who discussed the interview on CBS This Morning Tuesday, said, "We were mesmerized and riveted by some of his answers.  I feel that he answered the questions in a way that he was ready. … He certainly had prepared himself for this moment. … He brought it.  He really did."

Armstrong had apologized to staffers at the Livestrong Foundation before the Monday interview with Winfrey, and reportedly admitted to them that he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout his storied career.

Armstrong also confessed to Winfrey to using the drugs, sources have told ABC News.  Winfrey said Tuesday morning that the entire interview, for which she had prepared 112 questions, was difficult.

"I would say there were a couple of times where he was emotional," she said.  "But that doesn't describe the intensity at times."

As for the cyclist's sense of remorse, Winfrey said that will be for viewers to decide.

"I would rather people make their own decisions about whether he was contrite or not," she said.

The interview will air on the OWN network for two nights, starting at 9 p.m. ET Thursday and continuing on Friday.

Meanwhile, the federal government is likely to join a whistle-blower lawsuit against Armstrong, originally filed by his former cycling teammate Floyd Landis, sources told ABC News.

The government is seeking to recoup millions of dollars from Armstrong after years of his denying that he used performance-enhancing drugs, the sources said.  The U.S. Postal Service, which is an independent agency of the federal government, was a longtime sponsor of Armstrong's racing career.

Sources tell ABC News the deadline for the government potentially joining in the matter was a likely motivation for Armstrong's interview with Winfrey.

The lawsuit remains sealed in federal court.

Armstrong is now talking with authorities about possibly paying back some of the Postal Service sponsorship money, a government source told ABC News on Monday.

The deadline for the department to join the case is Thursday, the same day Armstrong's much-anticipated interview with Winfrey is set to air.

Armstrong is also talking to authorities about confessing and naming names, giving up others involved in illegal doping.  This could result in a reduction of his lifetime ban, according to the source, if Armstrong provides substantial and meaningful information.

The interview at his home in Austin, Texas, was Armstrong's first since officials stripped him of his world cycling titles in response to doping allegations.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jan152013

Lance Armstrong Admits Doping in Tour de France, Sources Say

Morne de Klerk/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Lance Armstrong on Monday admitted to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, sources told ABC News.

A goverment source tells ABC News that Armstrong is now talking with authorities about paying back some of the US Postal Service money from sponsoring his team. He is also talking to authorities about confessing and naming names, giving up others involved in illegal doping. This could result in a reduction of his lifetime ban, according to the source, if Armstrong provides substantial and meaningful information.

Armstrong made the admission in what sources describe as an emotional interview with Winfrey to air on Oprah's Next Chapter on Jan. 17.

The 90-minute interview, taped in Austin, Texas, was Armstrong's first since officials stripped him of his world cycling titles in response to doping allegations.

Word of Armstrong's admission comes after a Livestrong official said that Armstrong apologized Monday to the foundation's staff ahead of his interview.

The disgraced cyclist gathered with about 100 Livestrong Foundation staffers at their Austin headquarters for a meeting that included social workers who deal directly with patients as part of the group's mission to support cancer victims.

Armstrong's "sincere and heartfelt apology" generated lots of tears, spokeswoman Katherine McLane said, adding that he "took responsibility" for the trouble he has caused the foundation.

McLane declined to say whether Armstrong's comments included an admission of doping, just that the cyclist wanted the staff to hear from him in person rather than rely on second-hand accounts.

Armstrong then took questions from the staff.

Armstrong's story has never changed. In front of cameras, microphones, fans, sponsors, cancer survivors -- even under oath -- Lance Armstrong hasn't just denied ever using performance-enhancing drugs, he has done so in an indignant, even threatening way.

Armstrong, 41, was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned from the sport for life by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in October 2012, after allegations that he benefited from years of systematic doping, using banned substances and receiving illicit blood transfusions.

"Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling and he deserves to be forgotten in cycling," Pat McQuaid, the president of the International Cycling Union, said at a news conference in Switzerland announcing the decision. "This is a landmark day for cycling."

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency issued a 200-page report Oct. 10 after a widescale investigation into Armstrong's alleged use of performance-enhancing substances.

Armstrong won the Tour de France from 1999 to 2005.

According to a source, speaking to ABC News, a representative of Armstrong's once offered to make a donation estimated around $250,000 to the agency, as 60 Minutes Sports on Showtime first reported.

Lance Armstrong's attorney Tim Herman denied it. "No truth to that story," Herman said. "First Lance heard of it was today. He never made any such contribution or suggestion."

Armstrong, who himself recovered from testicular cancer, created the Lance Armstrong Foundation (now known as the Livestrong Foundation) to help people with cancer cope, as well as foster a community for cancer awareness. Armstrong resigned late last year as chairman of the Livestrong Foundation, which raised millions of dollars in the fight against cancer.

The New York Times reported Jan. 4 that Armstrong told associates he is considering admitting that he used banned performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions during his cycling career. The Times' unnamed sources said he would admit the information in order to restore his eligibility in athletic events such as triathlons and running events. Herman denied the claims were true.

Armstrong, who has spent so much energy bitterly fighting accusers and whistleblowers, has left many questioning whether Winfrey's televised absolution will be able to help his cause.

Winfrey tweeted the news to her followers last Tuesday night. "BREAKING NEWS: Looking forward to this conversation with @lancearmstrong #nextchapter"

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jan092013

Lance Armstrong to Speak with Oprah Winfrey on Doping Scandal

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Oprah Winfrey will interview cyclist Lance Armstrong for Oprah's Next Chapter on Jan. 17, her network said on Tuesday.

The 90-minute interview at his home in Austin, Texas, will be his first since officials stripped him of his world cycling titles in response to doping allegations.

"Oprah Winfrey will speak exclusively with Lance Armstrong in his first no-holds-barred interview," a news release reads.  "Armstrong will address the alleged doping scandal, years of accusations of cheating, and charges of lying about the use of performance-enhancing drugs throughout his storied cycling career."

Oprah's Next Chapter at 9 p.m. is the primetime series on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.  The tell-all interview will also be simultaneously streamed live on Oprah.com.

Armstrong, 41, was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned from the sport for life by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in October 2012, after allegations that he benefited from years of systematic doping, used banned substances and received illicit blood transfusions.

"Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling and he deserves to be forgotten in cycling," Pat McQuaid, the president of the International Cycling Union, said at a news conference in Switzerland announcing the decision. "This is a landmark day for cycling."

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency issued a 200-page report on Oct. 10 after a wide-scale investigation into Armstrong's alleged use of performance-enhancing substances.

Armstrong won the Tour de France from 1999 to 2005.

According to a report by 60 Minutes Sports on Showtime, the head of the doping agency said a representative of Armstrong's once offered to make a donation estimated around $250,000 to the agency.

Armstrong's attorney Tim Herman denied it.

"No truth to that story," Herman said.  "First Lance heard of it was today.  He never made any such contribution or suggestion."

Armstrong, who himself recovered from testicular cancer, created the Lance Armstrong Foundation (now known as the LIVESTRONG Foundation) to help people with cancer cope, as well as foster a community for cancer awareness.  Armstrong resigned late last year as chairman of the LIVESTRONG Foundation, which raised millions of dollars in the fight against cancer.

The New York Times reported on Jan. 4 that Armstrong told associates he is considering admitting that he used banned performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions during his cycling career.  The Times' unnamed sources said he would admit the information in order to restore his eligibility in athletic events such as triathlons and running events.  Herman denied the claims were true.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct102012

Lance Armstrong's Teammates Claim He Doped

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) -- Eleven of Lance Armstrong's former teammates who helped cycling's greatest champion clinch seven victories at the Tour de France, say they also helped Armstrong use performance enhancing substances, according to a new report by the US U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

According to the USADA, which banned Armstrong for life from professional competition and stripped him of his record-setting Tour titles, the athlete, his coaches and teammates "ran the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen."

In a statement released Wednesday, the USADA said its investigators had interviewed 26 people with direct knowledge of Armstrong's doping and would release nearly 1,000 pages of evidence bolstering their claim that the cyclist used performance enhancing drugs.

In a career that spanned two decades, Armstrong underwent more than 500 tests for banned substances and never failed one, proof, he says, that USADA's findings amount to little more than a "witch hunt."

From 1999-2005, Armstrong cruised to victory at the Tour as the premiere rider on the U.S. Postal Service Team. The witnesses who lined up against him read like a Who's Who of American cycling, including Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis, champion riders who were earlier found to be doping.

Responding to the press release previewing USADA's report, Armstrong's attorney Tim Herman called it a "one-sided hatchet job -- a taxpayer funded tabloid piece rehashing old, disproved, unreliable allegations based largely on axe-grinders, serial perjurers, coerced testimony, sweetheart deals and threat-induced stories."

"Ignoring the 500-600 tests Lance Armstrong passed, ignoring all exculpatory evidence, and trying to justify the millions of dollars USADA has spent pursuing one, single athlete for years, USADA has continued its government-funded witch hunt of only Mr. Armstrong, a retired cyclist, in violation of its own rules and due process, in spite of USADA's lack of jurisdiction, in blatant violation of the statute of limitations, and without honoring … national and international rules," Herman said in a statement.

USADA will release the complete findings of their investigation Wednesday.

Many of the teammates who testified against Armstrong never tested positive for doping, but admit now that they used performance enhancing substances.

Armstrong tried to fight the USADA ban in court, but gave up and accepted the sanctions.

International cycling's governing body, the UCI, will soon review USADA findings and decide whether it will implement its own sanctions against Armstrong.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Aug242012

Lance Armstrong Drops Fight over Doping Charges

Bryn Lennon/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Cycling great Lance Armstrong has decided he will no longer contest charges by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career.

"There comes a point in every man's life when he has to say, 'Enough is enough.' For me, that time is now," Armstrong said Thursday night in a statement.

Armstrong added, "If I thought for one moment that by participating in USADA's process, I could confront these allegations in a fair setting and -- once and for all -- put these charges to rest, I would jump at the chance."

Calling the process "one-sided and unfair," Armstrong still maintained his innocence.

"Regardless of what Travis Tygart says, there is zero physical evidence to support his outlandish and heinous claims," he said Thursday.

The USADA on Thursday said it has not received direct confirmation from Armstrong that the retired cyclist will cease his fight against the doping charges.  However, the agency's CEO, Travis Tygart, responded to Armstrong's announcement.

"It is a sad day for all of us who love sport and our athletic heroes.  This is a heartbreaking example of how the win-at-all-costs culture of sport, if left unchecked, will overtake fair, safe and honest competition, but for clean athletes, it is a reassuring reminder that there is hope for future generations to compete on a level playing field without the use of performance-enhancing drugs," Tygart said in a statement Thursday.

Armstrong now faces the possibility of being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, as well as a potential lifetime ban from cycling.

The International Cycling Union, the sport's governing body, says it will wait for USADA to explain why the former champion should lose his titles before commenting on the case, according to a statement posted on their website Friday morning.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jul132012

Lance Armstrong Gets a Favor on Capitol Hill

Bryn Lennon/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong appears to have found a friend in Congress to help wage war on his new nemesis, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

Armstrong is facing USADA doping charges that threaten to strip him of his Tour titles and ban him for life from elite sports.

People on the inside of the case aren’t the least bit surprised the apparent help is coming from the Wisconsin home of Trek Bicycles, Armstrong’s longtime sponsor.

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., on Thursday sent a letter to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to investigate “the use of the roughly $9 million in taxpayer funding given to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).”

USADA is the agency that acts as the nation’s top cop for doping in sports and regularly tests athletes to ensure clean results.  It is generally not considered controversial, but is seen as a safeguard for clean competition, working hand in hand with the international group, the World Anti-Doping Agency.

In response to Sensenbrenner’s letter, USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said the case against Armstrong “was not brought lightly.”

“The evidence is overwhelming, and were we not to bring this case, we would be complicit in covering up evidence of doping, and failing to do our job on behalf of those we are charged with protecting,” Tygart wrote.  “We will reach out to Congressman Sensenbrenner and offer to come in and discuss the process, which is the same in all cases whether it involves high-profile athletes or those who are not.”

Earlier this week, Armstrong attempted to have his USADA case thrown out in federal court but a judge quickly rejected his claim.  His legal team has since filed a new lawsuit and is awaiting a hearing.

Also this week, three of Armstrong’s former team doctors and trainers were given lifetime bans by the USADA for their roles in running what one source called “one of the worst and deepest doping conspiracies the world has ever seen.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul122012

Lance Armstrong Gets 30-Day Extension to Answer Doping Charges

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The United States Anti-Doping Agency has granted Lance Armstrong a 30-day extension to answer the organization’s charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions while winning seven Tour de France titles.

The extension comes one day after the champion cyclist re-filed a lawsuit against the anti-doping agency in federal court to stop it from imposing a deadline of this Saturday to either accept the charges and face a lifetime ban and the loss of his titles, or reject them and enter into arbitration.

Armstrong’s lawsuit claims he has been denied due process.  His attorney, Tim Herman, says the extension will give the court “sufficient time” to review the cyclist's complaint.

The USADA said in a statement it granted the extension “until the court dismisses the lawsuit or rules on any preliminary injunction.”

The agency statement continued, “USADA believes this lawsuit like previous lawsuits aimed at concealing the truth is without merit and is confident the court will continue to uphold the established rules which are compliant with federal law and were approved by athletes, the U.S. Olympic Committee, and all Olympic sports organizations.”

Two doctors and a trainer associated with Armstrong received lifetime bans this week for their role in what the agency said was a “doping conspiracy.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jul092012

Lance Armstrong Suit To Dismiss Doping Case Thrown Out

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong faced a stunning and swift blow Monday from a federal judge in Texas who shot down Armstrong's attempt to stop the doping case that threatens his legacy.

Armstrong's legal team filed a federal suit Monday morning in the western district of Texas in an attempt to shut down the U.S. Anti- Doping Agency case against Armstrong.

But by late Monday, Judge Sam Sparks had already rejected the suit in a strongly worded order that said Armstrong appeared to be playing to the media more than to the legal system.

"This Court is not inclined to indulge Armstrong's desire for publicity, self-aggrandizement, or vilification of Defendants, by sifting through eighty mostly unnecessary pages in search of the few kernels of factual material relevant to his claims," Sparks wrote in the order.

Armstrong's lawsuit had claimed USADA doesn't have jurisdiction in his case, while also accusing the agency's CEO, Travis Tygart, of waging a personal vendetta against Armstrong.

The stakes in this case are huge for Armstrong and the clock is ticking. If he doesn't respond to doping charges by Saturday -- and ask for an arbitration hearing to fight the accusations -- a lifetime ban will go into place and he could face the loss of his Tour de France titles.

If he does go forward with the proposed hearing, USADA plans to put at least 10 former teammates under oath with detailed allegations that Armstrong used performance enhancing drugs and strongly encouraged others on his team to do the same.

Neither scenario is particularly attractive for Armstrong's legal team, which argues that former teammates have been coerced into testifying against the Tour champ. This lawsuit was an attempt to at least slow the case down, if not to do away with it altogether.

The Armstrong lawsuit called USADA a "kangaroo court." It charged that "the process [USADA] seeks to force upon Lance Armstrong is not a fair process and truth is not its goal." The lawsuit also claimed "Defendants would strip Mr. Armstrong of his livelihood, his seven Tour de France titles and the many other honors he has won."

To this, Sparks wrote: "... the bulk of these paragraphs contain 'allegations' that are wholly irrelevant to Armstrong's claims and which, the Court must presume, were included solely to increase media coverage of this case, and to incite public opinion against Defendants."

The suit was dismissed without prejudice, and Armstrong's lawyers can re-file within 20 days.

Sources close to the investigation say the real goal of the Armstrong claim was to try to bankrupt USADA by tying it up with expensive litigation while at the same time putting the agency on trial.

"This is the route hardcore dopers always take. They play by their own set of rules," said one source.

USADA has dealt with similar litigation with other athletes and expected this move.

Officials wouldn't comment on the Armstrong filing, but issued a brief statement from Tygart, saying in part: "Like previous lawsuits aimed at concealing the truth, this lawsuit is without merit and we are confident the courts will continue to uphold the established rules which provide full constitutional due process and are designed to protect the rights of clean athletes and the integrity of sport."

In the meantime, Armstrong's former team doctors who are also facing USADA charges have mostly remained quiet. They have until Monday night to respond to their own charges or face sanctions that could include a lifetime ban from participating in sport. His longtime coach Johan Bruyneel has asked for an extension and like Armstrong has until Saturday.

Armstrong, who has previously called the charges against him a "vendetta," refused to comment on the case his lawyers filed Monday.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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