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Entries in Female (3)

Wednesday
Nov282012

Female Servicewomen Sue Pentagon over Combat Policy

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The American Civil Liberties Union is suing the Pentagon on behalf of four women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan but feel stifled "by a policy that does not grant them the same recognition for their service as their male counterparts."

Specifically, the servicewomen argue that the Defense Department's combat exclusion policy prevents them from achieving the same leadership roles as men.

In one instance, according to the ACLU, Maj. Mary Jennings Hegar, an Air National Guard search-and-rescue helicopter pilot, was shot down while rescuing three injured soldiers in Afghanistan and was forced to exchange fire with the enemy.

Although Hegar was awarded the Purple Heart and Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor, she maintains she was kept from seeking other responsibilities due to the Pentagon's policy against women in ground combat.

Meanwhile, two of the plaintiffs led Marine Corps "female engagement teams" in Afghanistan and the fourth plaintiff, while in the Army, was sent on similar missions, accompanying combat troops in Afghanistan.

However, the ACLU says because the missions were temporary duties, they were not officially recognized by their services.

According to the ACLU, women make up 14 percent of the armed forces, with 1.4 million now actively serving.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov192012

Christmas Abbott, First Female NASCAR Pit Crew Member, Fights Against the Odds

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- NASCAR has seen a few women drivers at the elite level, but never before has a woman muscled her way into the extremely physically demanding positions getting down and dirty in the pit.

Christmas Abbott, 30, is the first female pit crew member in NASCAR, where in less than 12 seconds, she and her team refuel the car and change the tires.

Abbott is responsible for the front tire position, in which she must remove five lug nuts, sometimes as the car is still moving, muscle off the tire and put it aside, then get a new one on and replace the lug nuts, all within seconds. Then she must race around to the other side of the car and do it all over again.

In her recorded practices that are studied each night, Abbott's times are within milliseconds of the big leagues.

Her job is crucial in a multi-billion-dollar business. If there's just a few extra seconds at a pit stop, the driver loses.

 

Abbott was discovered in January at an audition and recruited just like the former football and professional hockey players she works beside. Her competitive nature drew her to the high stakes of racing.

With heels on, Abbott stretches to five-foot-three but don't be fooled by her size. She is an incredible brand of athlete called a cross-fitter. Abbott has built her body through intense workouts and crazy competitions. In one competition, Abbott carried a 125-pound friend with one arm and a 70-pound weight in the other. Combined, Abbott was carrying twice her weight.

"Now I can see that my body is developing into this very precise machine where whatever I want to do, or whatever I believe I can do, ultimately I will be able to do," she said.

At first, Abbott's pit crew coach, Shaun Peet, wasn't so sure about her.

"To be honest with you, I thought it was a publicity stunt, you know what I mean, and I wanted no part of it," Peet said. "And I think, I was convinced, when I saw her. She ran a 6.8 [second] right side the other day, which for as long as she's being doing it is exceptional."

But Abbott does have her detractors in the garage. Men whisper that she won't last and they appreciate her for all the wrong reasons. But she doesn't care. All that's on her mind is her first race in three weeks.

"I feel like I'm bringing something huge to the sport, but this ultimately is much bigger than me," Abbott said. "I find that those things that scare you most are most rewarding once you've conquered them."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May102011

Female Pickpocket Ring Allegedly Steals $500,000

Courtesy of Sterling Heights Police Department(STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich.) -- If you're at the mall in Sterling Heights, Mich., don't assume that sweet, old lady in a hat just returned from the royal wedding. She might be there to rob you.

Police in the tiny Detroit suburb say an all-female criminal ring made up of middle-aged and elderly women are running a sophisticated con in which they allegedly pick the pockets of unsuspecting shoppers and use the stolen credit cards elsewhere.

Nicknamed the "Mad Hatters," the ring is made up of at least six women who frequently wear hats to disguise their identities and have allegedly swiped more than $500,000 in the past year and half, authorities say.

One bank alone estimated it had lost at least $200,000 at the hands of the hatters.

Some members of the group work as pickpockets, allegedly stealing credit cards and cash, usually from women at local shops. Other members commit the fraud, allegedly using the stolen cards to make purchases mostly in Macomb County but in the four surrounding counties as well.

The hats run the gambit from floppy beach hats to a variety of berets colored black, white and blue.

Police are investigating several leads that have come in since images of the women began circulating on Monday.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio