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Entries in George Huguely (23)

Thursday
Aug302012

UVa. Lacrosse Killer George Huguely V Sentenced to 23 Years in Prison

Albemarle/Charlottesville Regional Jail(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- A Virginia judge Thursday sentenced convicted University of Virginia murderer George Huguely V to 23 years in prison for the beating death of his ex-girlfriend Yeardley Love.

He will serve 23 years, plus one concurrent year for the grand larceny conviction, ruled Judge Edward Hogshire of Charlottesville Circuit Court. He also ordered three years of probation after completion of the 23-year term.

Huguely, 24, was convicted of second-degree murder on Feb. 22 for the beating death of Love in 2010.

Before the judge's ruling, Huguely briefly addressed the court.

"To the Loves, I'm sorry for your loss. I hope that you are able to find peace. To my family and friends, thank you for your love and support," Huguely said through tears.

The Love family sat somberly with their heads down as the sentence was announced and left the courtroom soon after. The Huguely family remained stoic through the judge's decision.

Huguely's attorneys told reporters outside the court that they plan on appealing both the conviction and the sentence.

"Our client, Mr. Huguely, remains optimistic," the attorneys said.

In a statement, the Huguely family wrote, "Today is a sad day for our family. The past twenty-eight months have been the most difficult in our lives. We love George and will always support him."

They maintained that Love's death was "an accident with a tragic outcome," and said that "Yeardley will always be in our hearts."

Love's mother and sister, Sharon and Lexie Love, also released a statement in which they thanked prosecutor David Chapman and everyone who helped them through the past two years.

"We find no joy in others' sorrow. We plan to work diligently through the One Love Foundation to try and prevent this from happening to another family," they wrote. "We are relieved to put this chapter behind us. Again, we would like to thank everyone for showing us such kindness during the most difficult time of our lives."

Huguely's attorneys asked a Virginia judge Thursday to consider reducing the former University of Virginia athlete's sentence to 14 years in prison, from the 26 years recommended by a jury. The judge cut the recommended sentence by three years.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Apr272012

Yeardley Love's Mom Sues Killer George Huguely for $30M

Albemarle/Charlottesville Regional Jail(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The mother of slain UVA lacrosse star Yeardley Love is suing her daughter's convicted killer and ex-boyfriend George Huguely V for $30 million in a wrongful death lawsuit.

Huguely, 25, killed Love, 22, in a drunken rage in May 2010 just weeks before she was to graduate from the University of Virginia. Both Huguely and Love were star lacrosse players on the university's elite teams.

Huguely was found guilty of second-degree murder and grand larceny, resulting from an allegation that he stole Love's laptop. He has not yet been sentenced.

The suit was filed in Charlottesville Circuit Court in Virginia on Wednesday under the name of Love's mother Sharon Love, listed as the administrator of her daughter's estate.

Love asks for $29,450,000 in compensatory damages and $1,000,000 in punitive damages, plus interest from the date of occurrence, May 23, 2010.

There are six counts in the suit: three types of negligence counts, one count of willful and malicious injury and death, one count of assault and one count for punitive damages.

"Huguely was negligent in the occurrence, insofar as he failed to use ordinary care, leading to an accident for which he was responsible that resulted in the injuries and death of Love," the lawsuit states.

It also claims that Yeardley Love had a life expectancy of 58.9 years, according to a Table of Life Expectancy, which helped calculate the sum of the monetary damages sought by the Love family.

The lawsuit accuses Huguely of acting with "actual malice" and being "so reckless" that he showed a conscious disregard for Love's safety and life.

Love's family suffered "sorrow, mental anguish, and loss of solace, which may include society, companionship, comfort, guidance, kindly offices, and advice of the decedent," according to the damages portion of the filing.

The family says the $29 million sum also includes Love's loss of income as well as funeral and burial expenses.

Yeardley Love's beneficiaries are her mother Sharon Love and sister Lexie Love. The women of the Love family were constant fixtures in the courtroom throughout Huguely's trial. They both gave emotional testimonies in Huguely's pre-sentencing hearing, pleading for the jury to punish Huguely.

Huguely's attorneys Fran Lawrence and Rhonda Quagliana did not immediately respond to requests for comment from ABCNews.com regarding the lawsuit. The defense team has expressed their desire for a retrial in court.

In February, the jury recommended 25 years in prison for the second-degree murder conviction and one year for a grand larceny conviction. The judge can either confirm or lessen the sentence, but he cannot increase it. Huguely's sentencing date has been set for Aug. 30.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Apr162012

UVA Lacrosse Murder: Sentencing Date Set for George Huguely

Albemarle/Charlottesville Regional Jail(RICHMOND, Va.) -- The fate of convicted murderer and former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely V will be decided in a formal sentencing on Aug. 30, a Virginia judge ruled Monday.

In February, a jury recommended that a judge sentence Huguely to 26 years in prison for the beating death of ex-girlfriend and classmate Yeardley Love. The judge can either confirm or lessen the sentence, but he cannot increase it.

The jury recommended 25 years in prison for the second-degree murder conviction and one year for a grand larceny conviction for stealing Love’s laptop computer.

Huguely, 25, was not present at Monday’s hearing and the judge denied several efforts by the defense team to discuss motions for a retrial. The judge said that should be discussed at a different date.

There will be a hearing on Thursday to discuss a motion to release evidence from the trial to the media for “educational purposes.” The evidence – including a video of Huguely’s police interrogation and letters Huguely wrote to Love – were kept from the media and the public throughout the trial.

Huguely was accused of killing Love in a drunken rage in 2010 just weeks before she was to graduate from the University of Virginia. Both Huguely and Love were star lacrosse players on the university’s elite teams.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb232012

Juror on George Huguely Verdict: We 'Believe Justice Was Served'

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- A jury recommended Wednesday that a judge sentence George Huguely V to 26 years in prison just hours after finding him guilty of second-degree murder in the beating death of his ex-girlfriend, Yeardley Love, at the University of Virginia.

The jury recommended 25 years in prison for the second-degree murder conviction and one year for a grand larceny conviction resulting from an allegation that Huguley stole Love's laptop.

Circuit Judge Edward Hogshire is scheduled to formally sentence Huguely, 24, on April 16.

Huguely, of Chevy Chase, Md., had his head down in court as the sentence recommendation was announced.

The Charlottesville, Va., jury of five women and seven men reached its guilty verdicts after nine hours behind closed doors.  The sentencing recommendation came about three hours later.

Huguely was accused of killing Love in a drunken rage in 2010 just weeks before she was to graduate from the University of Virginia.  Both Huguely and Love were star lacrosse players on the university's elite teams.

Two jurors gave ABC News their rationale for the verdict on their way out of the courthouse.

"We worked hard to come to a fair, just verdict," one juror said.  "We had a good team -- educated, well-informed people.  We all really believe justice was served.  Everyone felt good about our decision."

The juror said there did not appear to be "premeditation," so they could not convict Huguely on the first-degree murder charge.

Members of the Huguely family were visibly upset as they left the courthouse.  A little girl, one of Huguely's cousins, was crying hysterically and saying, "That's too much."

Huguely's mother was kept protected on the inside of the group and Huguely family members did not speak to the media.

Huguely's attorney, Francis McQ. Lawrence, said the defense was "disappointed with this verdict but proud to represent George over the years."

"He has the support of a loving family, has displayed amazing resilience and courage, is hopeful and spiritual, and we look forward to some corrections on what happened here tonight," Lawrence said.

Sharon and Lexie Love, Yeardley Love's mother and sister, left the courthouse from a side exit and also did not speak to the media, though they released a written statement after the sentencing.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb222012

Jury Finds George Huguely Guilty of Second Degree Murder 

Comstock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- A jury found George Huguely V guilty Wednesday of second-degree murder and grand larceny in the beating death of his ex-girlfriend Yeardley Love.

The Charlottesville, Va., jury of five women and seven men reached their verdict after nine hours behind closed doors.

As the verdict was announced Huguely barely reacted, putting his hands to his face a few times near his chin. He looked over briefly at his family and friends in the front three rows of the courtroom.

Huguely, 24, was charged with killing Love in a drunken rage in 2010 just weeks before she was to graduate from the University of Virginia.

Wednesday the jury began hearing testimony immediately and subsequently recommended that Huguely receive a prison sentence of 26 years. The jury recommended 25 years in prison for the second-degree murder conviction and one year for a grand larceny conviction resulting from an allegation that Huguley stole Love's laptop.

Circuit Judge Edward Hogshire is scheduled to formally sentence Huguely on April 16.

The family of Yeardley Love released the following statement following Huguely's sentencing:

"We dread looking back on the events of May 3, 2010 and pray for the strength to get through each day.

Time has not made us miss Yeardley any less, in fact quite the opposite.

It is truly devastating to wake up each day and realize that she is no longer here. Yeardley's contagious smile, kind spirit and gentle touch have left this world but we know that heaven has an angel like no other.

We will continue to keep her spirit alive by performing works of kindness in her name.

We would like to thank the Commonwealth and particularly Dave Chapman for his tireless efforts on our behalf.

Our hearts burst with pride when we think of Yeardley's accomplishments but our hearts melt when we remember her kindness and grace.

We have received letters from so many people telling us stories of her many acts of kindness. Intelligence and athletic ability are God given talents.

Kindness and compassion are choices ... choices that Yeardley made every day without a second thought. We'd like to thank everyone for their kindness and respect of our privacy during such a difficult time."

Sharon & Lexie Love

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb222012

Jury Begins Deliberations in George Huguely's Trial

Hemera/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The fate of accused murderer George Huguely V is in the hands of a Charlottesville, Va., jury. Deliberations began Wednesday morning.

Two female alternate jurors were dismissed by the judge after being chosen at random, leaving a final jury made up of five women and seven men. The alternates were permitted to leave, but remain under oath until the conclusion of the case.

Huguely, 24, faces six charges, including first-degree murder, in the death of former girlfriend Yeardley Love. He pleaded not guilty to all of the charges.

Over 10 days in court, jurors listened to testimony from nearly 60 witnesses and saw a video of Huguely's police statement, graphic photos of Love's battered body, and read text and email correspondence between the two.

Though charged with first-degree murder, the judge gave jurors a menu of lesser charges they can choose from: second-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter.  He could also be found not guilty.

Neither the prosecution nor the defense denies that Huguely was in Yeardley's room the night of her death and was involved in an altercation with her.  They differ on the severity of the encounter and whether Huguely was directly and intentionally responsible for Love's death.

Over the course of the trial, prosecutors painted a portrait of Huguely as a violent and enraged man who savagely beat Love in her bedroom and left her there to die.  Prosecutors claimed that Love died from blunt force trauma to the head.

The defense depicted Huguely as a troubled young man whose problems with alcohol spiraled out of control.  They described Huguely and Love's relationship as mutually tempestuous, with both of them jilting and betraying each other.  They maintained that Huguely went to Love's bedroom with the intention to talk to her and that, while things got heated and he pushed her around a bit, he did not do anything severe enough to kill her.

Depending on the jury's verdict, Huguely could be sentenced to anywhere from one day to life in prison.

Huguely has been in jail for about 21 months and could get credit for time served, so a sentencing of anywhere up to roughly 21 months could allow him to go free.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb212012

George Huguely Trial Jury Deliberations: Will He Go Free?

Hemera/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- On Wednesday, jurors in former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely V's murder trial will begin deliberations to decide the 24-year-old's fate -- and two legal experts have told ABC News that it is possible that Huguely could be free by the end of the week.

Huguely faces six charges, including first-degree murder, in the death of former girlfriend Yeardley Love. He pleaded not guilty to all of the charges.

Though charged with first-degree murder, a Charlottesville, Va., judge gave jurors a menu of lesser charges to choose from: second-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter. He could also be found not guilty.

Neither the prosecution nor the defense denies that Huguely was in Yeardley's room the night of her death and was involved in some altercation with her. They differ on the severity of the encounter and whether Huguely was directly and intentionally responsible for Love's death.

Depending on the jury's verdict, Huguely could be sentenced to anywhere from one day to life in prison.

Huguely has been in jail for about 21 months and could get credit for time served, so a sentencing of anywhere up to roughly 21 months could allow him to go free.

The jury is made up of 14 people: 12 main jurors and two alternates. There are seven women and seven men, ranging from their late 20s to early 50s.

Court will reconvene at 9 a.m. on Wednesday for the jury to being their deliberations. The two alternates will be released Wednesday morning.

Jurors could reach a verdict as early as Wednesday. If the verdict is guilty, the jurors will reconvene as early as Thursday for a sentencing hearing.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Feb192012

Jury to Deliberate in George Huguely's Murder Trial 

Comstock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Jurors in former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely V's murder trial will now have three days away from court to think about what they have heard and seen before reconvening to decide Huguely's fate on Wednesday.

Huguely faces anywhere from one year to life in prison, based on what the jurors decide.

After Saturday's closing arguments, jurors decided they were too tired to begin deliberations, so court will reconvene on Wednesday at 9 a.m.

Court is closed Monday because of the holiday and a grand jury day was previously set for Tuesday.

The jury is made up of 14 people: 12 main jurors and two alternates. There are seven women and seven men, ranging from their late 20s to early 50s.

Over the course of two weeks of the trial, the jurors listened to nearly 60 witnesses, including family, friends and teammates of Huguely and Yeardley Love, as well as a bevy of experts, most of which were medical.

In addition to the multitude of witnesses, the jurors have watched videos, read correspondence and looked at graphic photos.

Defense attorney Fran Lawrence began his closing arguments Saturday with his hand on Huguely's back, stating repeatedly that his client had "no intent" to kill Yeardley Love.

"George played a role, but it's overwhelmingly a tragedy," Lawrence said, maintaining that there was no intent to kill. "He contributed to her death but he did not kill her. He left her there alive and that's not up for dispute."

He referred to Huguely as a "stupid drunk" and "boy athlete" who was not calculating or malicious. Lawrence said Huguely went to Love's apartment to talk to her and to make up, not to kill her.

Lawrence said Huguely and Love were living in a "lacrosse ghetto" of attractive twenty-somethings and that the drama of romance led them to "jilt" each other.

The attorney said Huguely's "I should have killed you" email was an expression, not a threat, which he likened to a parent telling a child, "I will crush you."

The attorney contradicted the prosecution's claim that Huguely slammed Love's head against a wall, saying that Love may have fallen.

Lawrence told jurors to re-watch the video of Huguely's police statement and that they would see from his reactions that he had "no clue" Love was hurt or dead.

The defense attorney reminded jurors of a surveillance tape they saw Friday from the burger bar Boylan Heights the night before Love died that showed her and Huguely holding hands, saying it was an affectionate moment between the two.

Lawrence told jurors that alcohol ruined Huguely's life, but that he never intended to kill Love.

"Involuntary manslaughter needs your careful consideration," Lawrence said. "If you have any hesitation, that's a reasonable doubt."

Prosecutor Warner "Dave" Chapman delivered emotional closing arguments earlier Saturday, crying as he delivered his final remarks to jurors.

Chapman teared up as he gave the jury his account of the moments leading up to Love's death.

"She couldn't scream ... was it his hand over her mouth? Was it her face being mashed into the floor?" the attorney said. Huguely was almost a foot taller and 100 pounds heavier than Love. "She never had a chance."

Chapman read from the letter of apology Huguely sent to Love in February 2010 following an incident in which he had been caught holding a terrified Love in a choke hold. The letter was found in Love's desk drawer after her death.

"Alcohol is ruining my life," Chapman read from Huguely's letter. "I'm scared to know that I can get that drunk to the point where I cannot control how I act."

Jurors were shown the letter earlier in the trial, but its content had not been available to the public or media.

The prosecutor again addressed the email from his opening statement in which Huguely wrote to Love, "I should have killed you," after he found out that she had been with another man.

"These messages convey the depth of his anger and hard feeling toward Yeardley Love," Chapman said.

"Can you imagine the sight and sound and fury?" Chapman asked of the moment when Huguely kicked a hole through Love's bedroom door in order to get in. "She's freaked out at what's come through the door. First his foot. Then him."

The attorney said Huguely made no effort to help Love knowing that she was injured after their encounter and said he lied to his friends about where he had been because of what he had done. He said Huguely's acts were intentional, not accidental, and that "voluntary intoxication" is no defense.

The attorney questioned why, if Huguely hadn't beaten Love to a point where she was disabled, did she let him leave with her laptop or not call for help after he left?

Huguely was charged with first-degree murder, but jurors were also given the options of second-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter.

There are two theories under which Huguely could be found guilty of first-degree murder. The first is premeditation, that he had formed a purpose to kill her before doing so.

"The purpose doesn't have to be formed a long time [before], it could be formed quickly right before the killing, but they have to decide that his intent was to kill her," University of Virginia law professor Anne Coughlin told ABCNews.com.

The second charge that could lead jurors to a first-degree murder conviction, the felony murder count, does not involve premeditation.

"If they can prove the underlying felony, that he broke in to take her laptop and that he caused her death in the course of the felony, it could still be first-degree murder without premeditation," Coughlin said.

Jurors' could also decide on second-degree murder, a "more elusive category to define," according to Coughlin.

"It's a killing without premeditation but with malice," she said. "We're looking for some callousness or hardness of heart, which could be established by proof that he didn't intend to kill her but hurt her badly and then left her there to die."

Voluntary manslaughter could be the conviction if jurors viewed the alleged killing as a sudden act of "passion because of provocation."

"The idea could be that he was enraged because of fights of the past, fights of that evening ... that he did lash out in a homicidal way," Coughlin said.

The jurors' final option, aside from a not guilty verdict, is involuntary manslaughter, the charge that Huguely's defense attorney said in opening statements should be the harshest outcome jurors should even consider.

"The question is whether he actually caused her death in the course of committing an unlawful act or if he behaved with some kind or recklessness," Coughlin said.

In total, Huguely has been charged with six counts: first-degree murder, felony murder in a robbery or attempted robbery, robbery of a residence, burglary, entering a house with the intention to commit a felony and grand larceny.

The possible sentences for the range of charges and possible conviction are anywhere from one year to life in prison.

"So you can see the stakes involved for both sides," Coughlin said. "It's huge. And it all comes down to his mental state."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Feb182012

George Huguely's Murder Trial Resumes

Comstock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A key defense witness' testimony in George Huguely V's murder trial has been tainted because defense attorneys broke court rules by improperly sending their medical expert information about a prosecution witness' testimony.

Huguely, 24, faces trial for the May 3, 2010 murder of Yeardley Love, 22, a star lacrosse player at the University of Virginia and a senior weeks away from graduation. Huguely was also a lacrosse player for the school's nationally ranked team.

The medical expert will be limited in what he can talk about on the stand because of emails sent after the trial had begun.

On Saturday, Judge Edward Hogshire ruled that defense witness Dr. Ronald Uscinski will still be allowed to testify, but not about any topics that were addressed in three emails sent to him from the defense team, including CPR.

The defense attorneys said the mistake does not affect their witness' credibility.

Hogshire told the defense that "this is an incredibly important issue" and he was "incredibly disappointed" in their conduct.

"It was done by council and it was done in violation of the rule on witnesses," the judge said.

Virginia's "Rule on Witnesses" prohibits witnesses from being empowered with certain information before their testimony once the trial is in progress.

Prosecutor Warner "Dave" Chapman provided the judge with three emails from the defense team in which defense witness Uscinski is included. The emails reportedly included information that summarized prosecution witness Dr. Renu Virmani's testimony.

Virmani is a cardiac pathologist who testified that "nothing was wrong with [Yeardley Love's] heart that caused her death." This was central to the prosecution's case in disproving the defense's claim that Love died from a fatal combination of alcohol and Adderall that stopped her heart.

The prosecution alleges that Love's heart was fine and that she died from blunt force trauma to the head after Huguely beat her severely in her bedroom and left her to die.

Uscinski told the judge he did not recall seeing the email, but the judge could decide that he is no longer allowed to testify.

When attorneys told the witness what his restrictions were since the email drama his response was, "Are you kidding me?"

Three emails were in question.

Two were sent on Feb. 10 and originated from Dr. Jack Daniel, a pathologist who testified in a December 2010 preliminary hearing that Love died from a caridiac arrhythmia due to drugs in her system, not from a severe beating from Huguely.

On one email, the subject line read, "RE: Subject Testimony" and the subject on the other was "RE: Dr. Vermani." The emails described Vermani's testimony.

The third email originated from defense attorney Rhonda Quagliana and was sent to three people, including Uscinski. It included information about CPR and blood reperfusion, tissue damage caused when blood returns to the tissue after a period when oxygen has been lacking.

"It is beyond belief that we are having to address this in this type of trial," Chapman said. He called the issues "something that should've never happened."

Chapman argued that the defense's witness has an advantage by knowing the topics at play ahead of time and that his knowledge is a "prejudice to [the] commonwealth."

Court resumed on Saturday after a two-day delay due to a defense attorney's illness, but jurors have still not been brought into court while attorneys argue over the potentially rule-breaking emails.

The defense is expected to present two more medical experts before resting its case. Prosecutors have said they hope to have their rebuttals today. If attorneys do not begin closing arguments today, they will present them on Wednesday and then hand the case over to the jurors.

The Charlottesville, Va., trial resumed briefly Friday, over Huguely's objection, but went into recess a few witnesses later because Quagliana was the attorney who has handled the defense's key medical witnesses. Huguely preferred not to proceed without both his lawyers, but the judge initially decided to carry on.

"We will not have any difficulty finishing tomorrow," Quagliana's co-counsel Fran Lawrence reassured the judge.

But the judge later postponed the session after Lawrence informed the court that Quagliana was too ill to defend her client.

The judge is expected to hand the case over to the jury Saturday or Wednesday.

"I think the jury will be persuaded that [Huguely] engaged in conduct that caused her death and there was some sufficient culpability," University of Virginia law professor Anne Coughlin told ABCNews.com. "The issue is how culpable. How culpable was his mental state?

"We know that he was in that room, that there was some conduct that caused death and the issue is what was in his mind?" Coughlin said.

Although Huguely was charged with first degree murder, along with five other charges, Coughlin anticipates that the judge will present the jurors with instructions that include a menu of options that include second-degree murder, involuntary manslaughter and voluntary manslaughter.

Based on what Huguely is ultimately charged with, he faces anywhere from one year to life in prison.

"So you can see the stakes involved for both sides," Coughlin said. "It's huge. And it all comes down to his mental state."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb172012

George Huguely Trial Postponed Because of Illness

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- George Huguely V's murder trial resumed briefly Friday over his objections but went into recess a few witnesses later because his defense attorney is sick. Huguely preferred not to proceed without both his lawyers, but the judge initially decided to carry on.

Defense attorney Rhonda Quagliana's unspecified illness forced the court to postpone the trial Thursday, and defense co-counsel Fran Lawrence arrived to court solo Friday morning with word that she was still ill. Quagliana has handled the defense's medical experts.

"We will not have any difficulty finishing tomorrow," Lawrence reassured the judge.

But the judge later postponed the session after Lawrence informed the court that Quagliana was too ill to defend her client. Court will resume at 9 a.m. Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., and not again until Wednesday.

The medical experts Quagliana has been preparing to question are key to Huguely's defense. He has been charged with first-degree murder, but his defense attorneys said in opening statements that the most serious charge jurors should consider is involuntary manslaughter.

The prosecution has alleged that Huguley, after a day of heavy drinking, beat Yeardley Love in her bedroom and then left her to die. Experts for the prosecution said that Love died from blunt force trauma to the head. Both of them were lacrosse players at the University of Virginia.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio